The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 10 months ago

103. Building Relationships With Your Customers’ Customers w/ James Lloyd

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Two sets of customers don’t equal just two customer experiences. Customer experiences are myriad — especially in B2B healthcare technology, where your customers can grow 5x in a month.

 

In this episode, I interview James Lloyd, Co-Founder and CTO at Redox, about serving both his customers (healthcare software vendors) and his customers’ customers (health systems).

 

James talked with me about:

 

- Managing multiple user experiences

 

- What healthcare can learn from other markets & vice versa

 

- The wild & mysterious world of telehealth

 

- What is the cynefin framework, anyway?

 

Subscribe, listen, and rate/review the Customer Experience Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play or Google Podcasts, and find more episodes on our blog.

We are all patients, and we reallythink about it- is how can we make sure that t the best minds in the world areworking on hoping solving healthcare? The single most important thing you cando today is to create and deliver a better experience for your customers,learn how sales marketing and customer success experts create internalalignment, achieve desired outcomes and exceed customer expectations in apersonal and human way. This is the customer experience podcast. Here'syour host, Ethan Beaute, managing multiple customer experiences,designing a buyers journey for tech tools and infrastructure, adapting keytechnologies and building team resilience during and post pandemicthat some of what will walk through today with a gentleman who holds threebachelors degrees, one in German, one in mathematics and one in physics he'sthe CO founder and chief technology officer at redox engine, the Modern Apifor healthcare or por their home page right now, the simplest way for vendorsin provider organizations to exchange health data, James Lloyd, welcome tothe customer experience, podcast yeah think so much for having me yeah. Soyou recently moved from. Was it Madison Wisconsin today compared to yourexpectations six months in what is better about Denver than you expectedand what is maybe surprising or perhaps even disappointing relative to yourexpectations? So the thing that's better, is I really, as a visitor, you don't quiteget to value the proximity to the mountains of just like an everyday typeof experience, and so then loving the the access to nature and the weatherthat we have here and then what's surprising, is just everything that comes with living in aslightly larger city. I think I'm...

...pretty much right downtown in Denver-and you know Madison is a basically a college town of a few hundred thousandpeople and yeah. There's just there's lots of interesting things going on allthe time. Some awesome, some less ofesome and yeah. So just the just thelifestyle of being in a larger city has been has been one of the the surprisesfor sure. Cool on the upside traffic is probably amazing right now relative towhen you moved here on the downside that will ramp up while everything getseven more interesting, a dynamic for year. In a great spot, it's fantastic-and I hope you know when it's more safe and fun and cool to spend time withpeople in person. I'll come up and see you oyeah. So you are the first CTO on theshow and I'm really excited to have a customer experience conversation with acofounder and CTO, not that that's exclusively what defines you but to get started. When I say customerexperience o you, what does that mean? What does it conjure yeah? So for me, the customerexperience goes ever. You know really starts with the upfront expectationsand desires of the folks who may may have a problem andthat they're looking tosolved and then all the way through the experience ofleveraging our products in o r our platform and and ensuring that ye theirlives get a little bit easier and that we can have an impact in the world aswell. So maybe a little bit of something that's kind of interestingabout about redoxis. We Ne Ourselves as a as a platform where our users aretypically softwar developers, but when we think about customers overall, wethink about the companies that are creating technology and healthcare, aswell as the patients that are involved in receiving care, as well as theorganizations and providers who are servicing in providing that care. So wehave, you, know Indovidet of kind of...

WHO's, maybe paying us we vew R. Ourkind of ecosystem is involving lots of customers who all have an experiencethat we're trying to drive. That's awesome. I love the problem orientationin particular that you introduced. I don't think, there's enoughconversation about that, although you know you hear I in pockets, and I appreciate in particular the ideathat you are taking into account kind of the customers of your directcustomers and including them. As you know, obviously, fellow stakeholders inthe problem solution dynamic that you're in with your customers, not tosay customers to many times there, and you already. You already took one steptoward it, but go ahead and lean into it further for people who aren'tfamiliar. Tell us a little bit more about Reedacx like who is your idealcustomer or customers, and what problem do you solve for them? Absolutely so redox is a data and technology platform in thehealthcare space and we really help technology. Vendors, gettheir services and technology in the hands of patients and providers and aslight weight and low friction way is possible and one of the things that'skind of interesting about health, careag and I'm sure many of thelisteners have have maybe unfortunately run across some of these problems aspatients, but have the health care world, and especially the data worldwithin health care, s is fairly pregmented every hospital. Every holssystem runs their own data center, highly customized highly the spoken antiquated infrastructureand systems in play and as a technology vendor in this space. If you want toscale your product to many customers, which would be many hospitals or healthsystems managing all of those complexities and all of that the spokenature of each of those systems can be really challenging, and so one of theways that we...

...help reduce that friction is byproviding a single API and developer experience for the technology. Vendors,so hi can connect to our platform onths, and then we have a robust network andway to kind of standardize, all of those differenstances of all thedifferent elsystems. So we we work with about eight hundred or so healthsystems today which roughly Equaes to about twenty to twenty five percent ofthe the overall kind of US landscape. Then we have about three hundred or sosoftware vendors that are their customers of ours and they rangeeverywhere from ten person company to Fortune, one hundred type companies and yeah. So those are those are kind ofwho we typically work with, but in general we really love working withfolks who are making the world a better place for fations or providers. And? UReally delivering innovative technology to the the healthcare landscape and our goal is really to take on as muchof the burden of building a product and healthcare so that the folks who areworking at those vendors can an really focus on their end users and theirvalue props, and not have to worry about the complexities of just dealingwith withealt care. It's really interesting when so the company is whatsix and a half years oldish yeah around that yeah. We we have an interestingstarting sory, then probably Welli wouldn T I wa Goin to ask specifically is Imean this is obviously a problem and it's a very, very big one. So at theoutset you know, how did you view the scene and what were some of the kind oflike the primary motivators like what were you running after at the time andhas that evolved over time and has your view of the customer evolved over thattime as well so share anything you want on that like like go back to thebeginning? What what were you trying to do with the time and how has yourperspective changed over the past six years or so because again, I reallylike this idea of respecting your customers, customers, because that isthe true way to be a partner with your...

...customer, rather than just a vendor, isto take on their problems, take on their opportunities and really helpthem serve their customers more effectively. I really appreciate that.What I'm wondering is is that how Hou thought about a six and a half yearsago, yeah yeah, absolutely so when we first got started myself in the twoother cofounders, we actually worked at a large electronic health recordcompany. So this is the this is the type of software. The doctors andnurses are typing your allergies and diagnosseason to you, know, day tenhours a day and learned a lot about the environment and also the way thatthose qolts were not being really well supported by by technology. And youknow at that point a lot of the health healthcare technology industry looked alot like the productivity space in say the early twosands, where you just goteverything from Microsoft. You Got Outlook and word and access and extremeserver and everything like you just got it all bundled together and we saw theworld going through the the Gmail. And then you have targeted APPS freachthing and you use Asana and it connects to you your ther, all the other toolswith apis. There was a a sort of mypothesis that that that kind of shiftwould also take place on healthcare, because the demands that the providersand patients were having were evolving quicker than the the kind of largemonolythic software venors could could keep up with, and so our initial kindof first step into this was to actually start a healthcare technologyaccelerator. So we were trying to be part of helping prolicerate, all thesenew, very targeted applications, and we did that for about a year before werealized that we could not figure out how to make any money brunting anaccelerator nd. We had to pay rent and by food and stuff like that. Butthrough the process we learned that we learned some of the challenges toscaling a company, and we saw we...

...started about sen different companiesand we saw all their challenges. All the and one of the biggest areas was justhow do we? How do we connect and share this information? And so, as we werestarting te accelerator, we in the background were building a suite oftechnology for all those excelerator companies to use and, as we were kindof coming to conclusion, we probably needed to just become a a singlecompany. Rather than running an accelerator. We were looking around andsaying to we just joind one of these companies that we have any acceleratoror what and then the idea of thecoming. Actually, thetechnology platform company its as the company itself kind of went out,because we had we already had a bit of product market fi, because we werescratching our own itch and we had a bunch of mentors that we had built upin the accelerator and they all told us like, Oh yea his is he each problem yougotto go solve it, and so from from kind of day one. The idea was: standardization will provide efficiencyin a way that the new entrance to the market will be okay with they'll wantto be told. This is this. Is the right way to do it and there's only one wayto do it, and through that kind of standardizationand building a network around that agreed upon and kind of canonicallanguage. We cound really unlock and really lower the baried entry to a lotof the integration space, and then the other idea is was was that this shouldbe really really simple to use like we want people who do not have a masters, an healthcare adminstrationneeded to be able to develop against theur API and Healph ars its on thejargon and it's Youh know, there's no there's a lot of actual complexins toit right. It takes people twenty years to get a to get an MD or something likethat. So we're trying to abstract and simplifyas much as possible so that the folks are building our platfurm can do itsafely, but also do it really easiwy, it's cool. What are the DIS? What arethe disciplines of your two other cofounders? Are they? ARE THEY TECHORIENTED? Are they do? You have like a come just kind of a natural leader wholoves software? Do you have like a...

...sales like who are your cofounders atthat stage? Yeah, so allthe of us are still really heavily engage in tha inthe company today, so luke as ar CEO and he's really engaged on the TSA, like the finance operations, kindof management and a D and people side of the company, and then Niego is ouris or other cofounder and he's really externally. Facing and market orientedhas a background in economics. So he sort of is an interesting combinationof both a really academically oriented economist as well as sort of like thefront man of the band, and he used to do all the pitches and and everythinglike that, and so these things he's he runs our podcast actually, and he also you know, engages withgovernment groups on upcoming standard regulation and does a lot of that kindof externally facing activity as well. So in early early on we we definitelyall did every role and- and so it's but those are sort of kind of where we werwe focusd today cool. It sounds like a really nice balance and congratulationson you know getting this far. It's obviously a huge need- and I think, on behalf of people listeningwho don't quite know, all the guts behind their experience with withmedical providers, I'm sure they appreciate any of the friction you'veremoved. So let's get into the kind of the buyers journey piece of it. Youknow you have a go to market and SOM in clear and so listeners are clear. Areyou primarily like is your is, for example, your sales team or sales andmarketing? Are they primarily going out to the other software companies, or arethey going out to the healthcare systems or both and talk about likeagain kind of just generically speaking buyers journey for technical tools andinfrastructure? Yeah? Absolutely absolutely so. We've definitely had anumber of experiments and lessons...

...learned an kind of varieties of answersto this question. But what we do today and kind of our bread and butter isthrough engaging directly with the software vendors, as thits kind of who were or go to mark emotion is really towardsthe towards the software vengers, but we really think about it actually iskind of flywheel and and sort of really. The first entry point is withbringing a new software vender on to our platform, and so that's why we iss, where we market and do our sales,but we really think about it more, as once thats software venders on ourplatform, they will then work with one of their customers, which will be ahealth system, and as part of that, we will build a relationship with thathelp of them as well, and then we'll learn about some of their needs. Someof their upcoming vendors that maybe struggling or may need our services anwe can engage with them and then those software venders might bring us toother health systems and so there's sort of a feedback loop that can develop as part of that and soy. When we think about account management or customer success, then itstarts to get really pointed in both directions where we want to like helpfolks scale and have their technology and a business strategy aligned withwhat we're seeing- and you know we have really ligned in cinters with helpingthose vendor scale, but we also really want to work with Tha House systems tomake sure that you know their initiatives for the year or whatever,maybe can be yeah well served by the by the groups that we work with a D andhelp them get those easily as well super interesting, I can see a scenariowhere you are partnered with a software vendor. They they land a new healthsystem, but I would guess that, within your ecosystem, there are probably tthat health system might be using two two or three other technologies thatare part of your platform, that they maybe didn't know that they couldconnect them all. Tha 's that's right, and this this is where the benefit ofthis sort of network approach really really takes hold is historically, thiswould have been...

...a dozens of hours project for somebodyat that health system each time and through what we do. There's there's adecent amount of reusability and efficiency that comes from just kind ofamotizing that initial work with the health system across all the differentvendors that they could want to work with really interesting. I seeimmediate parallels with some of the partnership and integration work thatwe do here at Bombam through our VP of partnerships and integrations rebeccasFoma, and this kind of again I mean, I don't know network effect, flywheeltype thing where now, all of a sudden, we are of more value to the custom mova we get to meet our partners, customers and, if should theyparticipate with both of us were now more valuable to that customer thaneither one of us was individually. I see the benefits of it right away. Iwould assume that you have friends involved in a variety of other rolesand businesses. What are some of the parallels here from the way that you'reapproaching this in health care of you talked with other people just to kindof walk this out and make it even more mainstream to people working in a widevariety of businesses? Of course, I see the parallel right away, but you know:Have you had that type of conversation with some of your friends or colleaguesin other businesses, Yeah Yeah? So maybe maybe one of the best analogiesthat I can think of outside of health care would be a company called plaid, which is in thethe financial technology space and en they're a little behind the scenes toand really focused on developers as users as well. But if you've used aproduct like vemo or Robin Hood or any of those whenever you're transacting,the money from that apt to your bank and back and forth, that's actuallyplaied behind the scenes, and so there they're kind of managing all these APPson one side and all the banks on the other side and kind of playing thatnetwork role and yeah. I think e we're doing somethingfairly similar, but from you know, patients and providers on one side andAl Systems on and and hospitals on the...

...other side, so Isa that might theremight be maybe different industry a with a aninteresting analogue yeah yeah, I'm goinna kind of bounce back a fewminutes here you talked about kind of a CS or account management approach toboth sets of customers. Is that one team is that different teams? Or is itlike from a functional standpoint, because it's so interesting again? Thisis kind of that multiple customer experiences piece like for us will sellone account to one solo, preneur or whatever they're doing, but we also sel.We have, I think our biggest account is you know twenty five hundred seats orso and literally everything in between so would we organized CS around that?Obviously we have kind of groups of customers that have kinship in eithersize or industry, or that type of thing use cases etcet and that's just amatter of you know, that's. It seems to me less of an obvious cut, because someof the cuts are arbitrary, but here you're talking about two differentcommunities and you're, truly serving them in two different ways to thedegree that you're getting people who have some exposure familiarity in thatbusiness or industry. Obviously, that background is going to be a little bitdifferent that are those totally separate functions or like h. what'sthe interface there yeah yeah, so we we have one customer success organizationand within that team, there's actually specialization, but they can kind offloat between between as needed and and there's actually, three areas of ofspecialization where focusing on health systems is one side and then within thevendors side there's. Actually, we actually split it into two buckets aswell one, and it's really based on who our champion and state holders at thevendor are one of the interesting things ofbout our businesses, sometimesit's very financially or business driven, you know, maybe the buyer orthe champion might be tp sales or...

...something like that and then in othercases it's very technology stripen somebody who's looking for a componentto their infrastructure and it can be a VP of engineering or Vevia product isdriving it. Those are very different customer success. Engagements. So Doyou do an quarterly business review? Do you do a quarterly architecture reviewa and so we kind of split it on those Anklesas as well from a customers, sitUS scandpoint cool. Let's talk about your customers, customers. Thehealthcare experience were obviously in the middle of the pandemic. Who knows Imean it continues to take twist in terms for recording this as you'relistening were recording this. You know midsummer late July. I think it'llrelease in several weeks. So just I offer that for context for folks,because this is a dynamic situation, but obviously there are SOM, there'ssome high level truths that transcend any kind of immediate day today, weekto week, trends in cases and that type of a thing talk a little bit about whatyou've observed in you know with these multiple customers, in terms of I guesspandemic era, healthcare experience whare are some key trends there, andmaybe how are you responding Yor? How are your customers responding? Yeah? Absolutely so it's been. It'sbeen really interesting as kind of a platform company. We havesort of a portfolio of applications that are customers of ours and theyservice all vriety of problems in the health care space from patient bildingto reducing time in the weight room to doing diagnotics and doing telehealthvisits, and things like that, and there are pockets of our customer basethat have seen really massive growth and demand over this period. So folks,who are doing diagnostic testing for covid folks, who were doing tell healthfor doctors where you used to have to go into the clinic, and now you can doit over a video and books are doing remote, Pasien monitoring to make surepatients who got discharge ore still...

...fine at home, and don't need to comeback and things like that or are really growing a demand. An we've seen some ofour customers grow literally vivx in a course of a month. Things like that,whereas some of the other, maybe some of the efficiency folks or some of thefolks who are less oriented towards the response to Covid, have seen a bit ofslowdown in the in their demand and so trust. It's been an interesting kind ofconcentration of demand within a certain part of our certain subsid ofour of our platform and then on the health system side. You know a littlebit nunfortunately. A lot of what has slowed down has were also the primary profit centers for the healthsystem, so health systems are not doing great financially right now, and manyof them have had to furlough some of their administrative staff, which meansthat the folks that we to typically engage with either on the IT team or toget that initial cunactivity and integration set up with the EAL system,maybe strapter or maybe not even there right now, so there's been some someinteresting kind of rank, wrinkles coming up with that, but yeah. I thinkthe the folks who are folks who are directly engager are definitely growinggrowing fast and having a having a pretty large impact from fromour perspective, Solf yeah, it's en it's been really interesting. Havingthese conversations through this period, obviously- and healthcare has come upbefore, obviously not as intensely as this. This conversation, but you knowit's been interesting in that you know- is talking with Brian Gilman who's atvontage and they help people kind of essentially move a lot of activity tothe cloud, and you know wew're talking about somethingthat weve observed here at Bombom to which is especially with largercompanies that are thinking about adopting our technology, which allowsyou to recordind and video messages, which you know it was useful five yearsago or eight years ago, just as it is today, but people feel that need orthat that desire much more acutely and so some of our larger deals that werekind of stalled like...

...for aneven variety of reasons thatlarge larger deals tend to stell. Multiple decision makers etce, justlike all of a sudden back on the fast track like people that kind of ghostedyou a week or two or three back all of a sudden can't get enough of theconversation. They want to move it forward, forard forward, and so whathave you seen again with either kind of customer group in terms of theresilience required in this period and or the rapid adoption of technology inparticular? Have you made any observations there because I'm hearingthis kind of in conversation, a lot of people are like that, we're maybe onthe fence or we're on clear or all of a sudden go go go and in some cases youhave to do it yesterday, kind of Yeah Yeah. I think I think that's exespecially true in health care. I've seen some folks say you know things onDon twitter and stuff like that, that, like in healthcare technologies,advanced more in the past three months and it doid in the past decade beforethat- and I think a lot of that is because of Yo know the old addite ove necessities,the mother evinovation, and we have a crisis to respond to and everybody'sstepping up to the plate. We have a lot of customers. whove, like in a weekendmade a drive through testing application wherethey don't do anything like that. Normally and so there's been a lot ofnew inovation there and I think also a lot of the change, control and Policy andgovernance and procedures that normally exist within the health system and forgood reason. Just you know, because of the critical nature of the crisis oftthey've been you know, we don't need to put this through a month, longreview before we just start using it, and so that's that's really leap frog,some of those some of those processies as well. So I think both of thosereally contribute to to some of the somebody atceleration cool kind of a random question, but itoccurred to me, of course, as you're talking like okay there's a lot of data,probably moving through these systems.

You're obviously intimately involved inthat as the connector. Any tips for people who are considering so, forexample, we've had a for Aigh into much more regulated industries over the pastthree years. In particular, they want what we do, but they also like. There'ssome. You know, there's a lot of compliance so we're you know, movethrough sock to Tiht to and all that type stuff. Healthcare, of course, iseven more intense than most businesses, probably even as much or more thanfinancial services, for example, any tips for people that are looking tomove their technology or their software into markets that have even somepartially sumpartial movement toward the level of regulation and health care.Anything that you all have learned along the way or Costo yeahthin Orr,just like practical tips for people that are looking ton move into thosetypes of markets, absolutely absolutely yeah. I think the if you've gone through, something like like a sock to or like a PCI typecompliance yeah. Those are those are are kind ofsimilar. The thing that I would call out is different is just the the kind of breadth of considerationsaround specific, like data fields and getting into HIPPA, which is the kindof patient privacy regulation. There's a lot of things that are considered Phi,which is protected, health information, ND and so being sensitive about that,and sometimes it can even go further than that and go into you know their.What are they sharing kind of permissions between different users,and you know conductors see things that nurses, cant and, and some of some ofthat kind of user level like rolbates kind of controls, and so I would sayall of that is definitely going to be in play if you start to get into intothe healthcare space and then the other. The other thingthat I think is often daunting for folks coming into healthcare, is justthe...

...the breadth of likejust te breadth of data fields ingeneral right. So, if you're in financial technology thet, you havelike accout number a transaction amount who it went from and who went to andthere'sthere's there's. You know you're sort of thinking on the order of liketens of fields, maybe, whereas in healthcare you know, there's a hundredthousand different medications, there's three hundred thosend different typesof diagnoses and and you Kno, I could go on it on lab tests and and allergiesand all there's there's a large set of data to deal with that. Just adds. ThaLevel of complexity that is oftentimes folks haven't had a deal with comingfrom other industry. Interesting again, this another one's kind of random and Ithink, it'll kind of bring together the conversations that we're having here.You know, typically, I'm talking with marketing leaders, sales leaders, CSleaders, and you have built some of those bridges just through conversationhere, but I'd love to give you the chance, as someone coming from kind ofthe product, devside debtside in particular, what do you wish more folkskind of in in those roles? New were understood about about product and Dev.The process required the way you think about customers, anything that comes tomind like in order to again my goal here is to kind of build the bridgethrough conversations we can all serve our customs re effectively and so I'dlove Whil. I have you, you know anything that you wish more marketingsales or CS people knew or understood about kind of the tech side of thebusiness yeah. Absolutely I think one of the one of the more interesting thingscould be INJ. That is a way that the teams just generallyoperate and quite a different number of iterations on the types oftasks that they do. So you know, given sales person may try to close ten deals.This quarter or made you know, may take thirty intro calls this month or youknow something like that: wherefor a...

...product and engineering team. They mayhave one initiative for the next three to six months and the level ofpredictability and kind of law of large numbers that can give you some someconfidence in certainty in your forecasting on the sales marketingcustomer success side, like doesn't quite play out the same way on thePrarty Minagingside, also at least Lilis. For us, a lot of the things thatwe're doing are like nobody in the world's done it before right, sothey're brand new and you go into it you'r sort of eyes wide open and youtry to make sure you make the right decisions, but you K Ow, you reallydon't have a baseline in terms of what to expect in terms of how hard is this going to be even or orwhat are the challenges we're going to come across in a month from now andthings like that, and so I think, there's there's actually reallyinteresting foramework. I I have a a chance. They also Bok I'll talk aboutit called Canevan. It's a Bellword, I think, but it's basically kind ofbreaks problems into for domains, simple, complicated, complex andchaotic and complex are those ones where you you only know. Like point a from point B, you onlyknow like the outcome once you in Nsight, like you, don't really know thepath. The best path to take and a lot of engineering is in that world,whereas a lot of Liksales and marketing tends to be in the complicated worldwhere there's lots of steps between Amb, but you could kind of map them outahead of time and I think, having that men, mental model has been helpful forme to understand and talk to all the different state, colders and folksabout the kind of the worlds leach each side, livein and kind of prirs thik up.So it's awesome, I'm glad I asked that question and- and it is it'sinteresting- I think you know, as you said, I'm like, I totally see it, but Inever thought about it in that way before and it's absolutely true, and soI think you know, I guess to use a word that a Li guess, a lot of people areusing. Often now is empathy. U Know It's just some empathy for that. Forthat process and the lack of predictability, it's a reallyinteresting approach. I love what you...

...all are up to. You know one of the waysthat we talk about the importance of customer experience on the show, andwhenever I talk about it is you know, againt. Some of these dynamics, likehypercompetition and product parody, really raising up the importance of theexperience we create and deliver for our customers, and I really think youall are at the heart of it. You know the way you talked about already kindof lowering the barriers to entry and allowing things to happen more quicklyand seamlessly is. Is it's a really? I think it's so important for broadbroad innovation. I think the workthat you're doing is really cool and important. Thank you. Thank you yeah, and we actually have a internal kind ofphrase that we use, which is. We are all patients and we really think aboutit is how can we make sure that the best minds in the world are working onhelping solving healt care and I various entrally make that make thatpopulation smaller and so as much as we can expand the group ofpeople working on at the the better Roaltu cool? I just have to hope thatthere's someone else thinking about the insurance side of it, because that partis the most painful hey. If you are listening to this episode and you'veenjoyed it so far, I've got a couple more that I know you will like episode.Eighty three with Brian Gilman he's the VP of product in solutions, marketingatvanage, aready kind of talked about this one in our conversation, but heshared the three pillars for post crisis. Customer communication and itwas really all of the customer touch points not like marketing communication.We did talk about Tela Health. We talked about content contact centers.We talked about business continuity, some level resilience that one is areally intense one and then episode. Sixty eight with Josh feedy WHO's, thefounder of a software company called sales reach up in Minneapolis that onewas precovid, but we did talk about creating and delivering better buyingexperiences with video in particular, and so that's episode. Eighty threewith Brian Gillman episode, Sixty eight with Josh feedy James. Before I let yougo, I love to give you two...

...opportunities here. The first is tothink or mention someone who's had a positive impact on your life or yourcareer, and the other is to give a mentionor not or a shout out to a brandor a company that you really respect for they wait for the way they deliverfor you as a customer yeah. Absolutely so I think the the Pirston I want tomention is actually a cowarter of mine, but he and I go back to a previousemployer and he had an impact on me. Basically, on on day, one of myprofessional career W in his name's Andy Kitson, he's currently our VP ofpeople operations at Redact, but came up through the engineering team and, ifanybody's interested in having a great speaker on on running a distributed team or buildingteam cultures in a systems way of thinking, he would be a great person toreach out to. And then I think the the group that I would I'm probably going to try to flip yourquestion a little bit, because I would lite Yo give a shout out to one of ourcustomers, which is a company called curative inthe past two months. We've helped connect them to almost all of the states, public healthregistries, and they are performing hundreds of thousands of covid testsevery week and they're doing a maze of work killer. We need more of that andwe need more data on what's happening when we're. Why how around the resultsof those tests, especially from a gographic standpoint, absolutely yeahcool. Thank you for flipping that I appreciate it. If folks have enjoyethis conversation, they want to follow up with you or Reedox were some placesyou might send people yeah absolutely so you can reach out to me on Unlingdon.My name is James Loyd and then redoxis website is redox enginecom and we alosoare on twitter, just atredocks yeah and would love to hear from you.If there's any way, we can help or or just have a conversation awesome. Wecovered a lot of really interesting...

...topics. I love doing it from yourperspective as a cofounder and to CTO again. I really appreciate what you'redoing to a improve customers experiences and be to open up the doorsfor more innovation in a space that really really needs it. So I wish youcontinued success. Thank you so much for your time and for folks who arelistening. If you want links to some of the things that James mentioned there,including the gentleman I've already forgotten his name, but I'm going toI'm going to find him and add some links there. If you want to reach outto him so so we always round this stuff up, we put in video clips, we do ashort writup and I had some relevant links at Bombomcom podcast. That's justBONB BONBCOM PODCAST! Again, thanks thanks for listening, and thank youJames for spending time with US Tan, you clear, communication, humanconnection, higher conversion. These are just some of the benefits of addingvideo to the messages your sending every day. It's easy to do with just alittle guidance to pick up the official book. Rehumanize, your business, howpersonal videos, accelerate sales and improve customer experience learn morein order today at Bombamcom Book. That's Bo, MB, tombcom fuck, thanks forlistening to the customer experience. podcast remember the single mostimportant thing you can do today is to create and deliver a better experiencefor your customers, continue learning the latest strategies and tactics bysubscribing right now in your favorite podcast player, or visit Bombomcompodcast.

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