The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

104. Differentiating Far Beyond Product, Features, or Price w/ Stacy Sherman

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

You need to acknowledge that employee experience (i.e. happiness) is a bridge to customer experience.

 

In this episode, I interview Stacy Sherman, the Head of Customer Experience & Employee Engagement at Schindler Elevator and the Founder at DoingCXRight, about the EX/CX intersection. 

 

Stacy and I chatted about:

 

- The role of video in EX and CX communication (one of my favorite topics)

 

- The heart and science approach to interest in CX

 

- Why Stacy spends nights and weekends on elevating the customer-centric culture 

 

Subscribe, listen, and rate/review the Customer Experience Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play, or Google Podcasts, and find more episodes on our blog.

When your employees are reallyintentional and andit a happy, they then transfer to the customer. Thecustomer sees it and feels it especially the front line. The single most important thing you cando today is to create and deliver a better experience for your customers,learn how sales marketing and customer success experts create internalalignment, achieve desired outcomes and exceed customer expectations in apersonal and human way. This is the customer experience podcast. Here'syour host eaten Beaute humanizing, Your Businessindifferentiating, your brand in different cheating, far beyond productfeatures or price. That's the mission of today's guest and she's got a heartand science approach to doing it. Her background is in Account Management, ecommerce, sales, marketing and user experience, digital marketing andconversion optimization and related disciplines with companies like Atndtin Verizon, as well as brands like Martha Stewart and American girl. Shecurrently serves his director of customer experience and employeeengagement at Shenlar Elevator, where she manages and coaches team membersand more than sixty field offices. She also coaches and consults in customerexperience at Doing Cx, rightcom Stacy Sherman. Welcome to the customerexperience podcast hi. Thank you, yeah. I'm really excited about the storybecause in this conversation, because of two things in particular, one yourexperience in corporate America with very large organizations, as well asyour passion for doing this and doing some of it at night and on your owntime and things and helping other people in their businesses with it. Sothat's one. The other one, of course, is the bridge between employeeexperience and customer experience, and I love that. That's in your title inone of your many roles and hats that you wear these days, so I'm lookingforward to getting into it. But we'll start where we always start, which iscustomer experience when I say that to you stacy, what does it mean yeah, socustomer experience. Let me first by saying that customer service is a verylongtime used word. Customer experience is rather a new concept or methodology.I should say so. Customer experience is looking at theway. Customers and prospects go through interactions with a brand. So from themoment that a cut that a prospect, a person learned, I becomes aware of yourservice or product to the experience of actually buying it and getting it setup and using and paying and getting help, and that ged help is thatcustomer service recalling for help, and so it's really looking at designingthe entire journey, setting those those experiencesvalidating them with customers, real customers to make sure that theirexpectations are met with what you designed and then that's that's the bigpicture. But the key is that if the beginning, let's say how they learnedand bought and got set up, was great seemless easy. But if getting help whenthere's an issue is a high level of effort. Thatcustomer is very likely going to leave and even worse, they're going to tellothers so to your question. It is much more than just customer service whichis about to get help important phase of the journey, but people have to look atthe entire holistic view and that's customer experience that was fantasticthere. We a couple things I really really liked and I'll mention a coupleof them. First, as you talked about expectation management, it's soimportant, and that's one of the reasons that we need to look ateverything and make sure that it's all...

...consistent, because each touch sets upan expectation, hopefully a good one, and you need to continue to liver overand over and over at every one of these touch points. You also went straight tojust like straight out of the gates Ov, that definition or your thoughts on youwent straight to the operationalization of it, which you know a lot of us thatare not as we're not practitioners. The same way that you are some of us aren'twho are in this community that I'm trying to build around this, includingmyself, aren't students of it and practitioners of it quite the same waythat you are, and so I love that you went straight to the operationalaspects of it, because I think that's so key and I hope to get into somereally practical takeaways for those of us who are. You know aware that this isan emerging discipline that it is. There are nuances to it, that is beyondcustomer service. Customer support even customer success, which, in and ofitself, is kind of a practice in some language for some things that have afoot in the past, but also have a lot of new aspects to it. To so, that's afantastic go at customer experience. You also do a lot with employeeexperience and employee engagement, so couple things you could do here. Thatwould be really helpful. One is talk about employ engagement versus employeeexperience and or build a bridge from customer experience to employeeexperience. Yes, so just like I described thecustomer journey, there's also a journey for employees. So right fromthe moment, they learn about your brand and they becam. You know the hiringprocess and the onboarding experience and thentheir first ninety days and so on. So it is. The leadership in these companies haveto build oubt, what's the best in class journey for the employees, and, what'sthat experience engagement is what happens when it's a good experience. Soif, as a leader which I'm very conscientious of and intentionals tomake, my team feel that they are valued that th, that their views matter, thatthey're empowered to do what's right for internal and external customers,then they're more likely to be more engaged and what I've studied and havebegun to approve with data is that when you're Custo, when your employees arereally intentional and and theyre happy, they then transfer to the customer. Thecustomer sees it and feels it especially the front line. Does thatmake sense absolutely yeah. They are the ones who deliver the experience tothe customers for the most part, especially the customer facing rules.Obviously- and I like the way you separated employee experience from play,engagement- that the engagement is the outcome of doing it. Well, let's tiekind of the first pass in this last past. Together a little bit, I feellike just like a lot of people, maybe want to punt customer experience into acustomer success or even customer service organization. My feeling- andyou would know a lot better than I would my feeling- is- that a lot ofpeople want to punt employee experience, an employee engagement into hr ortalent management Taco. Is that what's happening in? Is that a mistake? Isthat an okay place to start like? What do you think about that? Yeah? That's athat's! A huge topic I'll share my views, which is that you do need a customer experiencecxo champion at the top, like with that said, there has to be a very closepartnership and collaboration with marketing with human resources, withoperations finance with everybody and Trie that drum beat and the bestpractices and helping everyone understand how they own the customerexperience. It's not one personer...

...department, it's everyone, it takes avillage, but you do need a champion at the top and then, when it comes to theHR topic there, obviously the first in line to the hiring customer, centricpeople and it's important that they are mindful to hire people and ask theright questions to make sure you bring the right people in that support theculture, the customer, centric culture. When it comes to the Voice of employee,I call Voe, which is some similar to voice of custom or VIOC. You have to partner whether if HR owns that elementof it, then it's just a close partnership. If this customerexperience team owns that element, I think there's a lot of value to that,because then you can really marry the voice o custom in the voice employee.When you are deciding new features, new products, new marketmessaging. I really believe you need to take both and marry it to come up withyour business strategy. I love it at the at just the outset ofyour response there, when you said Cxo is like okay. This is good, wouldn't itmake sense if you were to be in a position to assign someone to this,whether it's a cxo or a similar title to marry the EX and CX functions? Yes,my opinion is yes, there are some companies, I'm learning I'm actuallystudying a lot of different corporations. How are they structured?You know, I believe that HR has certainly a lot of human elements andbenefits and those things that keep you. You know retention, but when it comesto employ feedback as it relates to yourbusiness lines. That is a huge responsibility that I do believe ex andCx have to come together and if that's not how your company is aligned, youstill do it right. You still e the partner with them or you do it and yougive everybody that feedback, but it's important do you have any? We can dothis one quickly, because I know this would be an entire episode on its one,but I just want to double back into VOC and Voe. I think most people who listento a show like this would be familiar with VOC. VOE Is something theyprobably haven't heart. As often could you just do a quick drive by if Youw're,if you were to do like thirty minute consultation with abusiness leader who is, you know, is aware of these ideas, but not reallyintentionally practicing them. What would be your just like really quick,take on a few key measures around VOC, which I think most people would be ableto relate to in what do you do parallel to kind of capture VOE- and I knowthat's a huge, huge question, so you can have as much time at as ait as youwant, but I would hate to miss the opportunity to get like you know whatare three or four collection points or measures or ways to start payingattention to Vocvoe? Yes, so it's really important when a company or department luts say is developing a new. Let's say a newproduct. Where could be an existing product wot the new feature, so the oldway would be, you would design it and you would go tomarket, throw it out and hope it sticks, hope the customers want it in theirbattl old news. Okay and yes, and then you can get to customer feedback andsurveys and that's the old way. The new way that you actually could concernwhatever your new product service...

...feature into a different eater isstarting with the customer at the table and do concept validation. Ask ThemRight. You could have literally a piece of paper. It could be a sketch. What doyou think about x? What's your view on all these valuepropositions about x, rank and order? What really resonates to you andelaborate on those questions and by the way, if you had these features, Whatyour willingness to pay right so there's all this prototype testing,conset validation with customers before you even invested into this new bigidea, and then you go through that agile process of development and thekey is to because I know a lot of product teams have deadlines, and thisis about quality over speed. But in that whole phase that I justdescribed, you also, and you do get customers, quantitative and Qualitativfeedback. You also go to your employees to theemployees who are going to have to go, sell and promote this new product orfeature or service. So you ask them what about this solution makes sense toyou and you could actually ask them about. Maybe some of the trainingmaterial that you're putting together what's missing? What's confusing, soyou cocreate with all the people all involved the one Taviat, and I can'tsee this strong enough, which is never replacethe employee feedback instead of going to customers and I'veseen companies do that. Where they'll take that shortcut and say well, let'sjust go to the sales people and ask them instead of asking the customer-and you really have to do both- you cannot replace a customer, a customersview so good. You have to wait, collect it all way at all, and it's interestingit's. You know, as I think about some of the customer feedback that we get.You know, there's there's, obviously a balance. I like the way you approach itby the way you approach it from some place, different that I'm operating inmy mind. Right now, which is you know, you get customer feedback in a varietyof channels in a variety of ways, whether it's cancellation feedback orsupport ticket feedback or survey responses, or you know unsolicitedoffers via email or social media or whatever, and it you have to weigh. Youknow how important is this voice versus that voice versus that voice? And Ireally love your caution here: not to take three employees feedback for proxy.For the you know, a fair proxy for the three hundred people they talked within the past week right because it's filtered in its process. I agree withyou that the employe, the customers voice is super important andspecifically there's let's Bridguce a little bit into communication,something I've been really excited about in handling a lot of directcustomer feedback, which I choose to do a lot anytime. We do surveys and thosetypes of things you know we have people that are a little bit more hardcorethan me from a quantitative view, processing the data, but I alwaysvolunteer to take the quality, tie feedback and try to turn it into t Indo,meaningful things quantify to some degree, because I love seeing thelanguage people use. It comes with like a weigt and a character and the wordsthat they choose and these types of things- and so you already mentionedinternal communication with employees, to make sure that they understand wherewe're going with the big ideas and all of that- and that's that's one piece ofcommunication. What are some other internal anddoor external communicationtips that you have in terms of making sure that everyone's on the same pageandor that you're collecting the right stuff and some of the themes thatyou've already spoken to...

...yeah? So in terms of customer feedback, it isreally important to definitely ask your customers the rightquestions, and if you don't ask some the rightquestions, obviously you're not going to get the actionable beedback. Youneed to do something with it. So it's a science and an art in terms of thequestions, but also you have to close the loop and that means taking thatfeedback and we're talking about structured feedback. For this moment,not not talking about social media and ratings and reviews, because that'salso feedback that is part of the puzzle has to be past. I'm putting thaton a shelf for a moment, because it is equally important but taking the feedback and getting it intoyourselves. Your branch, yoursells offices, your product teams, yourmarketing team, so that they can actually understand what the customersaying and then use that to drive their business decisions and also let thecustomer know what you're actually doing because of their collectivefeedback. And what happens is a lot of times. I know I'v given feedback tocompanies, and then I think it's just in like some dark hole like it nevergets anywhere and in customers need to have trust andbelief that you're going to give feedback Ho you're going to dosomething with their feetback, otherwise don't waste their time.They'll actually be come a detractor and unhappy because you wasted theirtime yeah. It's so interesting. I just did atwenty seven hundred mile road trip with with our teenage son to visitseveral college campuses. One of them was actually open for an in person,tour, which I thought was pretty interesting and they did a nice job ofkeeping us safe and distant from one another. But obviously I engage with avariety of brands and companies, and I I took care just for fun to fill outfour feedback. Surveys. Kind of over the past week, or so is that kind ofcame to me and what you're talking about is something I just immediatelyacutely feel is like some of them were long and I just like would honor them.I just walk them out and take the sube questions that open up after you givethem like. You know, they've, hidden questions and all so we're asking ourcustomers to do so. Much, and I love your call here to close that loop andlet them know what is happening because the little thank you screen isn'tenough. A five dollar starbucks gift card is 'Ntough like I'm now somewhat emotionally investend,I would say the same thing for employees. Would you say the same thingwith regard to employees, because something that we do at Bombam is we doa twice annual all employee kind of survey? It's a little bit like anemployee nps at some level and there 's plenty of open fields, and so what wedo is a leadership, teamis kind of round up some of the feedback and then,if it's, some of the loop closing is moreappropriate to an individual and some of the looke closing is moreappropriate to a department or a team, and some of it's appropriate to theentire company. Do you have any thoughts or feedback on closing theloop with employees as well yeah? So well, I want to answer this frombridging the customer and the employee together. So what I see too often overthe years is that we have a tendency to focus on the negative and I'm encouraging. We talked aboutcustomer engageen, Employe engagement before an this is how you do it when acustomer especially calls out a particular name that really delightedthem and that they're grateful because Jo Shmo did, you know, went out oftheir way. You have to take that feedback and celebrate that person.Thank them. We don't do that enough as human beings and focus on the wonderfulhuman factors and and just always think...

...about what's wrong. What's Wheredo, wecoach to be better? Yes, you need that, but you need even more substantially todemonstrate what great looks like so voice of customer. They give feedback.I don't care what channel it is online offline, make sure that the bosses aregetting that feedback and they're taking the time to acknowledge thegreat employees, because that's going to feed them to do more excellence. Ilove it. One of these. This brings me right to something I was. It reallyexcited to talk to you about among a variety of other topics, which is video, something that we do this all the timeinternally and we teach people to do the same, which is you know, and I'vedone this many times myself. If I'm in a leadership meeting- and I hear that aFrontlo, if I hear a frontline employees name from a midlevel or asenior manager and it kind of crosses my radar- I will very often just make anote and like once a week I'll, go through these little notes that I haveof people. I want to thank or acknowledge or Checkin with or whatever,and just hey just want to, let you know as in a meeting earlier this week andso and so mentioned your name and the great work that you did with this thing.I just want to say. I really really appreciate you in the feedback I get bydoing that with a video is just through the roof. It like it. Just it's so muchdifferent. What is your interest in video with regard to some of thiscustomer communication or Employee Communication Yeah? I'm a huge, huge proponent ofvideo. I've been playing with the technology, including Bombam, and Ilove it, and the reason is because I know even for myself, my email inbox isso huge. I can't possibly get to all of it. Personal email work, email text,you know different communications flying at us all the time, and so and Iknow people don't really read, but when you get a video, especially when itsays one minute, thirty seconds whatever it's like. Okay, let me hearwhat they have to say and it grabs you right away, and so I've been playingwith that and testing it out, and then responses are like even a familymembers. You're like I was having a bad day. Your video just absolutelybrightened me up and I'm like wow. You know that was so easy, so quick, the feedback was phenomenal. So I thinkthat I know that video is here to stay. It is the future and what people needto do, because I'm speaking from experience is to not be afraid of thetechnology. I think that gets in people's way to do something different. So when companies like Bomba make iteasy to actually use the technology, if that'sa low level of effort, there's a higher chance that people are going to use itand tell others yeah. I really appreciate that. I love that you'reusing it for personal effect as well. I mean it's just t s. It goes tosomething you said earlier and I forget the exact language, but this is kind ofbe abridge to another topic. I want to talk about with you about your work andthe way that you approach it, but you know you mentioned something about. Youknow letting someone feel heard or letting someone feel seen and and it'sthat element there's there's so many moments, whether it's e the kind ofinternal leadership and management example. I offered the personal examplethat you mentioned jis just this taking this thought that I have like. Oh, Ineed to see how she is, or Oh my gosh. I just heard this interesting piece ofnews about thim and go reach out and congratulate and Li thank him orwhatever, making it into an action, but making him to do an action that peoplecan feel that, like that, that sincerity, that enthusiasm or thatconcern or that interest orthose softer side elements that are really difficult,just like type out and get through effectively yeah, I mean that's, that's the beautyof video, because you can't really...

...convey from the heart you could feel it.You can feel the energy went through a video, and I believe, especially duringpandemics like this, that we need to find these creative ways to keepconnection, to keep the feelings and address the feelings even moresensitively. And that's that's. What's going to change, I believe the way wecommunicate in the way we do business. I completely agree into the employeeengagement side to the degree that we can equip and empower our team membersto do the same like something that has kept me. I will have been a bombom nineyears full time in September, which is just absolutely insane it's twice aslong as I've been anywhere and the thing that always brings me back andbrings me to life is connecting with customers and knowing that we'rehelping them or that they're getting real impact in like when they feedbacksome of the stuff that you're doing in a positive way and give you theselittle stories and moments, and so I know that so many of our team membersare highly highly engaged because they have those same interactions withcustomers where they may be send a video to follow up on a support ticketand they get this reply back. That says, oh my gosh, that's amazing nd, so youstart to see more first names showing up ind some of these other feedbackloops and feedback channels, because they feel some attachment not to thecompany or the brand, but to Jessica right, because I feel, like I know,Jessica Dowan. She was so helpful to me anyway, so you mentioned in yourresponse there again. You know you mentioned art, an science you mentionedheart. You mentioned feeling a couple of times. Your approach to CX is ablend of heart and science and I'd love for you just to speak to that, because,just in you know we connected before this conversation. I've spent some timeon your website and I love that you're explicit about it and I think itmatters and I just be curious to hear about it in your own words like makingsure to be explicit about heart and science, yes, and by the way, the customerservice example you gave before with that video. The reason why it works isit's so personalized right. There's no cookie cutter approaches anymore to anybusiness, the more personalize. It is the more that it stands out. So heartand science to me is about so customer experience. There's, definitely amethodology on how you do it and there's the basics and then there'ssome really sophisticated techniques and platforms. So the science of it is a lot of the datathat comes from that methodical approach and even when you think about the basiclevel, if it's one on one customer interviews, if it's focus groups, ifit's surveys, there is the element that you get neumeric scores so becomes thescores and there's predictive predictability, modeling and futurebehaviors. Based on the data, you have ohe's a lot of data analysis, datascientists who really are doing so well in this field, because it's needed- andwe know people are not just buying on price they're buying on experiences. Sothere's a science to it, but then there's the heart, because at the endof the day a business is a business were buyingfrom people who are in the company and even some F. my friends have said: Ohmy boss, like I can't I can't be here and I'm like that's just a person.That's not the company is bad. It's just happens to be that you have adisconnect with your boss, but you know and same thing. If you have a badexperience with an employee, it's not the whole entire company is bad, butthe reality is perception is reality and it does affect the whole image. So Tha,the heart to it, is really diving into...

...the qualiative feedback and understanding what said and what's notsaid, and it does all come back to thesentiments and the feelings behind the neumerics. So that's why they're bothreally important you can't make any judgments calls without both pieces. Ilove it and one colors the other right. You can have some of this quality tofeedback and it might drive some questions that you can get answeredthrough the data. Likewise, you can sit and pour over the data, but it'smissing this context that even one little story from the qualitative sidewill completely change the way. This report looks yes, absolutely so again.I mentioned this off the top, but you're. Obviously all in you areactively studying you're doing it by day in a formal corporate role, you'redoing it nights and I assume weekends for fun and interest and passion doingsome consulting content development etcet. Where did in you alsoacknowledged in the beginning that there is something new about customerexperience as a discipline, so this is obviously not something that you weredoing at least under the label Cx, you know five or ten years ago. What wasthe kind of the dawn or spark or catalyst for your obvious passion forcustomer experience like where were you in your life for your career, wheresomething clicked ind you're just like all in or was it a slow build? Yeah? That's a great question, so I kind ofhave two answers in my mind: one is back in high school long time ago. Iwon't. I won't reveal how long ago there was no Internet then- and I was Iremember- I was in a marketing advertising class and we westudyingconsumer behaviors and actually I was all about subliminal advertising, and Iwas fascinated by subliminal ads anand. There were probably magazines at thetime and what's the message say and E, what makes people move a and takeaction, and I was fascinated and that pivoted me to go to college and Istudied all marketing and consumer behaviors, so Itwas, clearly in me to go that path as opposed toaccounting or engineering mor and then after college. I ended up in a salesrole at ATT and continued on to get my masters in marketing and when I was finished with my masters,that's when Google became Google and just the beginning of it and the worldonline. In fact, my thesis was: What's the Internet, it's Hilarious, to readit now, but and and so life goes on right. I went in and out of telecom anddifferent industries and then about five sit, maybe longer two thousand andthirteen ish. I was at Morizon. I was doing marketing at that time and myboss said to me you're now going to do customerexperience ind this BOC thing and as as I call it, I threw me a ball and I'mand I'm like what is this thing and he's like? I don't know, go figure itout, and so I did, and that was really the beginning of how I start to reallyunderstand, and that was an ECOMMERCE channel, so really understanding. Whentraffic came millions of people to borizoncom understanding well, what'sgoing to make them actually take out their credit card and pay and making sure there's no frictionalong that customer buying journey, and so there was so much around the onlinedigital experience turned it into Amni...

...channel the buying online pick up astore, and so it envolved and to the ants to finalize the story is that whenI got an opportunity where I am now at Shimar relevator corporation, I had a decision to make which was. Do I want to continue down the paththat I knew a long time, which was sales an and digital marketing? Or do Iwant to continue down a career path really around CX customer experience,because the new rorl Chinder was very much elevating the customer,Censir culture and bringing new ideas to the organization as the CX leader?And so I went that path and the beautiful thing is I we have amarketing department and and customer experience and we work together. So it's a collaborative thing: it takes avillage and I love this. I will IAM. I think the answer of why I spend somuch time on. It is because it doesn't feel like work. So when you do what you love and love,what you do doesn't feel like work yeah, what a healthy habit- and I get so many followed questions. Iguess I'll start with what are you doing with doing CX right? Yes, so itstarted as a blog several years ago and I really encourage people to find theirvoice, whatever they're passionate about and just rigt, just just right,just get it out there. When I launched this, I no idea if anyone would everread anything. I had to say I thought maybe I'd be, maybe my family and yourone. You do a lot wrong quickly and then your two and three it starteto really take traction, and you you learned so much and now, whereI am now is working on my dreams, which is writing books. I coathered two books, one dad on Kandlenow and paper back in a few weeks and then a second book coming in Octoberand mentoring people. I love that 's, my favorite part, so that I could helppeople who either want to get into the fields and don't know where to start orpeople who are experts and want to take to the next level, and I want to do some Ted talks I want todo. I have a lot of lot of dreams, so I'm adding them up, but but it's my owntrain ride right, there's, no speed! It's what comes! Naturally, when I havemy spare time, I love it. I love that you're th. It was just such a healthyhobby, its so wonderful and it's so naturally occurring what a what anawesome thing to be trusted enough by a supervisor to be thrown that ball. Youknow- and here we are years later- and it all makes sense in hindsight, butyouwould have never seen it coming then not only didn't. I see it coming then,but if that literally that ball, that that symbolic ball, I that wasn'tthrown to me and it was thrown to my neighbor- I wouldn't be sitting here today. Iwouldn't have known all the things I know and I wouldn't have gone for thecertifications I did. I wouldn't have. I wouldn't be here where I am now soeverything happens for a reason. I think I know also that, while I feltreally frustrated that that that boss threugh me something and couldn't helpme because he didn't know it made me tougher so that anythingthat comes my way now I figure it out. It did then, and now I can again soit's a good lesson. It's awesome and really that's a a nice summary of lifein general. You know you can either like duck and cover or just play itsafe or you can just go figure it out.

When things come your way I mean insome cases we don't have any other option, no, and I think the times were livingand right now, where nobody can predict anything right. Like I'm sending mykids back to college in you know svery shortly in days, and I don't know, and tomorrow the call cancome. No, no school or you know, total change. So I think that's our new wayof life of not knowing being prepared to catch the balls and learning what todo with it. Yeah, and I hope that we I in this this is, I guess, not reallyrelated to the to the topic at hand, necessarily, although it is in some way,this is the Hart side of it. I hope that, in light of that that that we cantrust each other as team members and his customers and service and products suppliers to justtrust that everyone is doing their best in light of the crazy situation, give alittle bit of space, give a little bit of patience, give a little bit of graceand you know just do our best together. I I love that you said that, and I wantto do a quick recommendation for and there's no I've, no incentivewhatsoever to give this recommendation. But you just said, like everyone dotheir best, there's a book that changed my life called the four agreements andthe fourth agreement is always do your best and it sounds so simple, but eachof the agreements, don't assume anything be impeccable with your words,don't take anything personally and always do your best and each one has alot of meat behind each of those sections and I had an epiphany actuallya couple weeks ago I wrote an article to inforbs now about how this principleapplies to business to, and so I encourage people to read thebook and apply to their lives, because then more people will do their best.They will have more empathy and magic happens. I love it. They'll bebetter people and better team members, and probably better customers too.That's awesome, I'm so glad I entertaind. That is sometimes I wonderin my own head, like H, W am I taking this off course. That's awesome, I'm soglad so. For folks wore listening, we do short writeups on all of theseepisodes. We take video clips from these episodes to kind of so you canmeet the guest a little bit differently than just spending time in your earbuds. With her, I also round up some links, and so of course, they'll beaccess to stacy's linkedin profile have doing CX right hooked up I'll. Have thefour agreements hooked up? I will. I will find that article in forms andHook that thing up, and so, if you're enjoying this podcast, of course youshould subscribe. I your preferred player, but you can go an extra step byvisiting Bombomcom podcast in there ou course. You can get what I offeredthere for every episode. In addition, you can check out other episodes solike if you like this one herer a couple more, that I think Oure Omtheme,that you'll also enjoy episode. Seventy three with Christopher Wallace, he runsa consultancy called interview, group inner. So obviously it's internallyfocused and we called that one marketing to your employees, not justto your customers, which we did a really nice drive by on earlier. Butthat's what his entire business is about is like rolling out biginitiatives like in very large companies and making sure that all thefrontline people thay need to execute it and deliver the experience, don'tjust know what's going on, which I think is often taken for granted, butalso aure, cognitively and emotionally bought into it, so that it's adelivered with some level of excitement and sincerity. Set's episode, seventythree with Christopher Wallace and then episode. Eighty with Gild Cohen, wetitled that one employee Experience Design how why and where to begin, andmy conversation with him is one of the reasons I was so excited to hear youseparate employee engagement from employee experience. That was somethingthat we talked about in that conversation as well in designing andemployee experience in order to create...

...a higher level of engagement and thenultimately, of course, deliver a better experience for your customers as aconsequence so stacy before I let you go, I need to ask you a couple morethings and I'll give you an opportunity to send people wherever you would likethem to connect with you. But first I I always love to know, and you did a niceshout out to the four agreements, but is therey person that you would like tomention. Who's had a positive impact on your life or your career. So many people, I would say, as a NAT neesariof my career, but as Ientered the CX space, who is I've mentioned him a lot? So if peopleeheard other shows they'll, they won't be surprised, but it's Shephikan redude.You know you know, Shawowo, hey so and and he's worth reinforcing againbecause he, as I said, he's he's fremous. You know no, no, no questionabout that he's famous and he never forgets where he came from and he helpspeople like me when I was first starting outto now he's there he's there for me he's been a mentor he's been sogivingof his time. He had the on as show Andy. He just gave me a voice and continuesto do that. So that's my answer. We need more ships in the world that isawesome. SHEP, Hikin, hy Keand he's hiking on twitter. He I agree, he's anawesome guy. He has been on this show and you know just to hear you say thatthat's a person who's, obviously going about his life and his work in a waythat is going to leave a very positive legacy. Mutual friend of ours, DanGingis, who I recently spoke with and who has also been on this show refereto him, as the Godfather is like wel course hes e Godfiter of, like you know,customer he's one of those people who did just a fantastic job of buildingthat bridge from customer service as its traditionally been done inbroadening it out to to experience in which calls back to your definition ofcustomer experience. Yeah funny o mentioned Damn Gengus, because I was onhis show yesterday and another great good nother, great guy,and the theme right that the invisible thread between those two guys and someothers is that, and hopefully people will say that about me on otherpeople's podcast one day, and that is it's about showing? U Authenticallyright this right now, there's no script, it's just coming from the heart and andthat's what those two guys do, and and many others women's in Cx as well, that that'sthat's how you know: That's how you build trust and Admirat Chen and payinga fowward. That's what it's about! I love it. That's also how you build acommunity and advance a movement in this case. It's the movement to makecustomers experiences better, speaking of which can you think of a company, your abrand, that you really appreciate a respect for the experience that theydeliver for you stacy as a customer. Yes, so again, people are going to know thisanswer, but that's okay, because I feel good about it and that is traitor. Jos. I love that from the minute I walk inthe door. People say Hello, so basic right, but they say hello. They there'sa journey right when you walk into when you leave from the register and thenbagging your stuff hat they're, talking to you and they're, giving yourecommendations about the products and when you walked in originally- and youdidn't know where something is other markets, the the you know, someone thestaff will just point to an isle and you're guessing. Where is that? Wheredo they just point trader Joes? They...

...walk you to the actual product, they'llopen the bag and I'm like don't know, don't don't waste it on me, a d like no,no, no, it's okay. We want you to really like it y. it's just filled witha lot of wild moments. That's that's my point, love it. It's people who careand- and it seems like the culture itself- Is Probably Pretty Fun and I'veseen trator Joes on a number of lists that specifically treat their employeeswell, which just is a reinforcement of what you've shared with all of us heretoday, which is that a great employee experience begets a great customerexperience. It's almost impossible to produce a fantastic employee experienceand not have a great customer experiences a consequence. It's trueand I am so excited, I'm going to be writing an article shortly. Iinterviewed some people at Trador, joes and what it's like, and- and so Iobviously we talk about it as consumers, but I'm going to be writing about itfrom the inside so awsome by fun, Great Tes, and if that happens, to releasebefore I release this episode. I'll put that ion, bombom hatcom sash podcast ecool yeah Ye. This has been awesome. I really enjoyed it so much again. Thereare several other places we could have gone, and so I have to have you back,but in the meantime, if people enjoyed this, where would you send them tofollow up and learn more and connect with you and maybe read some of yourarticles and that type of thing? Yes, I welcome that at doing doing, CX, rightR, ightcom and it's filled with th resources and tools and tips and whitepapers on how you can accelerate your skills and your practice, no matterwhere you work, no matter what industry you're in I'm happy to help awesomedoing CX rightcom check it out. Thank you so much for your time, stacy andthank you for listening to the customer experience, podcast, clear communication, human connection,higher conversion. These are just some of the benefits of adding video to themessages your sending every day. It's easy to do with just a little guidance,so pick up the official book. Rehumanize your business, how personalvideos, accelerate sales and improve customer experience learn more in ordertoday at Bombamcom book, that's Bo, MB, Bombcom fock, thanks for listening tothe customer experience. podcast remember the single most importantthing you can do today is to create and deliver a better experience for yourcustomers, continue. Learning the latest strategies and tactics bysubscribing right now in your favorite podcast player, or visit Bombomcompodcast.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (172)