The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 9 months ago

107. Improving Retention (From the First Hello) w/ Gowri Ramkumar

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Customer retention has always been important, but nowadays it feels absolutely vital. Trust, honesty, and relationship are the 3 broad categories of customer retention — but how to boil them down into actionable tenets?

 

In this episode, I interview Gowri Ramkumar, Customer Relationship Manager at Document360, about her guiding philosophy for customer support.

 

Gowri and I talk about…

 

- The relationship between customer experience & customer success

 

- How sales teams should act like doctors

 

- How honesty is required at every single level of communication

 

- How trust comes first

 

Check out this resource we mentioned during the podcast:

 

- Gowri’s podcast is Knowledgebase Ninjas

 

Subscribe, listen, and rate/review the Customer Experience Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play or Google Podcasts, and find more episodes on our blog.

Or customer success to me is helpingcustomers get the most out of our product, so it could be like getting ona support call to help hem with any issues they have or right from the demostage or right from your initial requirements. Gathering call the single most important thing you cando today is to create and deliver a better experience for your customers,learn how sales marketing and customer success experts create internalalignment, achieve desired outcomes and exceed customer expectations in apersonal and human way. This is the customer experience podcast. Here'syour host, Ethan Bute, three simple things: You and yourcustomer success team can do to improve customer retention. That's WHA, you'llget here on this episode and those three things come from a woman whoserves his customer relationship manager at three high growth softwarecompanies, including document thr, a d sixty she's, applying her background inengineering it and testing to improve customer service and customer success,and she hosts the knowledge bass in injes, podcast, Gowry Ramcamar. Welcometo the customer experience podcast. Thank you eaten for the brilliantinterduction to to me and my profession. I'm really looking forward to connectwith you today and share my experience awesome before we get going just tellus a little bit about the knowledge based NNINJAS podcast. How long haveyou been hosting it and what are you trying to do with the show fantasticyeah, so knowledge pase in just podcast, is a community event or activity we trid to do for thedocumentation community. So when we started marketing document THR ND sixtyto the market. Couple of years ago, we were looking at various options ofbringing this community together, and one of the ideas that came out was apodcast, because we could see huge...

...contributors to this community and wejust wanted to hear from everybody right from small company to all the wayto pick companies how they are using documentation. What are they doing withthe approcess etc? So, the I think of this podcast Starte, if I remembermaybe less than a year ago, but it's got an amazing response. So far,so I have spoken to various guests from different company size and it's amazingyep awesome. I love it. The keyword that you use there. I think iscommunity this and the podcast format does such a nice job of allowing peopleto have real conversations at depth about the work that we're doing everyday, and so I wish you continued success on that and again welcome tothis podcast or we're going to start this conversation where we always starton the customer experience podcast, which is your thoughts or definition ofcustomer experience. When I say customer Experience Goery, what doesthat mean to you so customer experience is the process of creating a positiveassociation with your brand. So it covers lots of things. So it's like howsatisfied or your customer every time they interact with your company. Itjust doesn't stop when the sale is finished. It's all the way till thecustomer is with you how many other years it goes awesome and for you youknow this has been kind of a background, not a debate, but you know I somethingthat different people as we define it from with different people anddifferent roles in different positions and different perspectives of customersand the customer experience. People see the relationship between customersuccess and customer service and customer experience a little bitdifferently. What do you think is the relationship between those two. I meanyou already addressed smartly, the idea that it obviously continues post saleinto the customer success in customer service experience, but when you thinkabout customer success and customer...

...experience, what is the relationshipthere in your mind, super so customer success to me is helping customers getthe most out of our product, so it could be like getting on a support callto help them with any issues they have or right from the demo stage or rightfrom your initial requirements. Gathering call so it's it's a customersuccess to me is how are you helping your customers to get the most out ofyour product? So to me, both are two different things, but they overlap alot in multiple ways. So, if I can say in one bird customer success is animportant part of customer experience, so they work together. They have to doyou might have to separate teams looking after your prospects, leadingthem to a customer. But then your customer success is is an integral partof your customer experience. So all put together is what you get your customersout of excellent. I really like the the separation there cs is an importantpart of CX, but it is a part of the overall experience. I agree so tell usa little bit, so you know you're with Covi, but you represent multipleproducts and brands, including document three sixty before we go further forcontact. I think what you're doing is really interesting. Tell us a littlebit more about the structure that you're operating in great so Koba as acompany was started back ten years ago and we have our flagship product, Pisto,thredd and sixty, which we started, selling to the Enterprise CompaniesThosanda, twelve onwird. So as a business we've been in this industryfor over ten years and foras customer experience or customer Serviceis reallysuper important because being multiproduct company, you never knowwhere you get your customers from my professt product customer might all ofa sudden get interested in my product...

...to and product three or civilitre,sixty oen in t, oredd and sixty. So if we keep our customers happy with oneproduct when the need comes for another product, it's very very easy for us toconvince so right now we have right now we have three to fok products and weare aiming to get more into the industry. So that's why it's importantfor me to make sure I know the pocustomers from all the three productsand I when and when we tink up with theirmorn relationship, calls very often we do ask them whats. Your requirement.Has Your requirements changed? Do you know we have a document thr sixty, soit also gives us that liverage to you, know, Cross cell different productsabsolutely and dissolve new and different problems that customers maybehave in common, and they didn't know that you provided that solution reallygood. Let's go specifically into document. Three n sixty tell us alittle bit about document, thre nd sixty. Who is the ideal customer forthat, and you know what do you solve for them? What problem are youaddressing for folks who participate in that product Sobir? So, as so mentioned,we've been in the sub industry for ten years or so so we before document thaddsixty, was released. We had two other products which are interprise products,mistoc thre, sixty and civil is three sixty and the only way how we can helpour customers is by having good documentation on our reeases on ourproduct features, various vedeos help, contentsific use, etc. So we usedocumentation heavily. So when we were looking at various options to writedocumentation for these product, unfortunately, we couldn't find a toolthat will satisfy all our requirements. So being a software company without M,that looks like a good cap. So let's,...

...let's start a product, so it allstarted back to two and a half years ago and we ar Cwo. He came up with thisidea to build documentary sixty and the whole journey is anamazing one tolisten. So if you leave me, I will talk for twenty four hours Owon to giventhrhand sixty, but it all started with a four week, Hackaton, where we pulledeverybody in the company right from low level department to all the way to thesales team or othe entire CCOMPANYATHING. At that point to wewere around sixty of them, so we all worked together on a fur weeke Hacketonperiod and we built the first framework so even before the Hackaton RC wo spentabout two months: brainstorming, various frameworks and ideas and afterthe Hackathon we worked again for six seven months and we released the firstquertion of document, Thr Dand sixty. So just to tell you what is documentthreand. Sixty document thry sixty is an online knowledge based managementsolution. So anybody who who'd like to manage their knowledge, bace Fus user,guides documentations online document thredy sixty is a solution for youawesome. I love this story of. We have a problem that we can solve forourselves because the market doesn't provide it and oh by the way, if thisis a need that we have, this is certainly a need that other companieshave and we could turn it into a product. It's outstanding. I thinkthose of US could, because I'm with you on this, those of us who have products that we can use in order tosell and serve our products more effectively are certainly in anadvantage position, because you know so many people inside your organizationdeeply understand not just the product itself, but why the product is neededat a deep level and how to use it an so you know bombob. Of course, we use ourown software to do all the things we...

...need to do, including selling andserving our software. Before we get into the three tips to improveretention, you have like a guiding philosophy, or what are some of thepremacies that you approach? Customer Service and customer success under kindof what guides you and the folks that you work with in terms of connectingwith your customers and helping them achieve success shure. So, as Imentioned, documentary six is actually coming from our own pain points right.So that's not only the document through sixty any product we pill so for theflaxship prodect pistor. Three sixty is also actually coming from aronepainpoint of not having a good monitoring solution for for integration,BISTOC integration platform, because we understand the painpoint it becomes iteven more easier for us to connect with hour customers, either through customerexperience or customer service. Because when somebody comes to us with the xasyrequirement, we can actually relate to our own painpoint. We had before webrought o any of these products, so it's easy to tolp their languagebecause we know what they are looking for and we can exactly tell this iswhat we had as a problem and that's why we have this feature in our product andthe moment we speak their language. It's so easy! You know they know. Theyfeel that they've been understood very well and it's a very smooth right. So in fact I won't even call my team as asales team. I always tell them that we are not there to preach our product. Weare there to solve their problem, so we should act like a problem solversomebody like a doctor. So when you go to the doctor, the doctors politely andquietly listens to Ra to your problem. Right he's not very excited. When youtell you problem, he quitly calmly listens, then he reatrates your problemand then tries to sucest a medicine for you so Sol. So that's what I tell myteam. You should treat yourself as...

...doctors, be customers, O prospects whocome to you. They have a problem in hand and they are looking for somebodyto listen and suggest. If we don't have a medicine, we should say we don't havea medicine, its Prev, because we e we are not expecting everybody's Problamto be solved by our product, but if we have, we should becam and address theyare payin points. So I hope I answered your question Yeah. Ireally like this analogy and I think it's such a health healthy approachboth to the sales and the service side of it, and I especially appreciate kindof what was implied in your response there, which is this honesty that wemay not be the right solution for you. I mean it seems so obvious and sointuitive, but I think you know t when we think about the sales side of ofcustomer relationships. I think it's easy for a lot of people to come upwith stories and examples of when maybe they were oversold something or sold,something that they actually didn't need. So I appreciate what you sharedthere. Can you think this just occurred to me? Can you in the answer? Maybe no,but can you think of an example of a time when a customer on document, thre,DD and sixty proposed an idea that you that maybe you were able to create afeature around or solve a problem that you, even as a user and kind of theorigin of the product? You know your own pain was the origin of documentthrge six year, like Oh, my gosh. This is great not just for this customer,but also for us, and you went and built it. Oh absolutely! So that's that's howwe grow so, though documenthry s, birth was from ourod pain points. The firstcouple of releases, or even three for releases, I should say, was our painpoints that we brought as features. For example, we have a backup and RESTORTIcapability in the product and we also have category level access securitygroup access to the product. So these were some of the pain points we had,because when our team, when the company grew from one product to three prodects,we wanted doumentation for all three...

...products, but not all writers to haveaccess to all the products. So we wanted to have that segregated accessfor creating contents, but was not available in many platforms. So that'sone of the features we have in document thre sixty you can give restrictedaccess to your writers. So not everybody is doing everything and notevery every department sees everything now what's happening is when, when westarted getting customers they of course have a lot of requirements to us.So we have a dedicated fapup platform. wher customers can come and ask whatthey want, and it also gives us other customers opportunity to vote on thosefeatures, because if you have a requirement itill, we want to knowwhether that's the same requirement for other customers. As will so weadvertise those requirements, we make it public. Other customers andprospects can vote for it and the more Bot a feature gets. We bring that intothe product. So we have brought many features that was requested by ourcustomers as as product capability and this level of interaction. This levelof relationship is actually making us whatwe are right now. So customers really appreciate that and they feel like. Weare part of their team yeah. I like it that Co creation definitely bringspeople in in a deeper way, where you're, not just a product provider but in facta partner in their business. And you know a lot of their suggestions canhelp your own business, which is great. So let's go into those three simplethings that teams can do to improve retention. Obviously, in a recurringrevenue business which extends far beyond software companies, almosteverything is is being sold from out a subscription basis. At this point,retension is obviously critical to the business model working, so your role isobviously critical to the success of the organization, not just to thecustomer. I guess those two are inseparable share with us, those threethings that you're trying to do...

...regularly to improve retention, and wecould take them one at a time here sure. So, since ours is a multiproductcompany and the three products as of now, we have three. The three productsare very different in nature: a couple of them ore enterprise products andwhich jas been in the market and neuspay customers for over eight nineyears, Tokmen Thrd, an sixty is, is a different product, so we still havecustomers from the very initial days when we launched Thesto, three sixty sothey've been using for eight nine years. So when it comes to customer attrition,we see very little touch wat. I don't know why, because I sincerely think it's because of theway we connect with our customers in the initial days. So when we collectEIR requirements, we are very open when they say they want five features. Forexample, if we are able to satisfy only three, we tell them a frient. We haveright now only three, but you can put that as a feedback and we will be ableto get that as a feature to you in our root mob. So I think that's one of thereasons why we think of the attristion Grat is very low for us and that's oneof the policies. We follow all the time, looking after your customers right fromyour initial days of conversation with them, so once you understood theirrequirement once they know what you are providing, they are happy and theyconnect with you once they become oeur customer, then what do you do with them?Also matters a lot, so I think you ask me for three simple things you can doto improve your pretentions right. So one first thing I would say, is lookingafter your customers just make sure not not until the sale is done right allthe way, even after they become your customer looking after them theirequirements. Their point point should still be in your mind because they canleave you at any point given given the...

...currenter model of subscription, it'seasy for a customer to keep jumping one fror a product to another right. So sothat's that's one of the things so looking after their needs andconnecting with them more often so make sure you are day for your customers,not until the sale is closed. Until they are your customer be sure to befor them. It could be a simple hellow message. You know if you've not heardfrom them for a long time, you can just simply say: Hi, we've not spoken for along time. How are you doing Blah Blah Blah that that makes that connectionmore strong? And I think the last point I would say is be honest. As I've beenmentioning right from the beginning, you don't need to oversell anything. Soif, if you know you can't do certain things for them, just be honest and saythis is what our productis and this is what Os Copus. I know we are not meetmeeting each other's requirement, but is this something you would like totake forward? So I think that honesty is required at every single level, sothat, though these are the three things that we try to keep throughout theentire company, if even within the development team, not only with thesales team, technical support everywhere, you go, we try to speak thesame language yeah. I think honesty, it's so interesting. I mea theserelationships are just like all of the other relationships in our lives. Ourrelationships with our team members with our family members with ourfriends like honesty, is the foundation for trust, of course, and trust is thekey to maintain the relationship over a long period of time. I also appreciateyour diligence to understand the customer and their requirements, theirpain, the the again the the kind of doctor approach of discovering,listening, leading and then considering prescription. I like the CO creationelement as well. There's a lot of really good stuff going down there, ouo transition a little bit because I...

...think your background is veryinteresting. I would as a marketer in a communicator. I would describe yourbackground as technical you've got an engineering degree. You've got acomputer science background. You built a career in testing. How do you feellike that background, set you up for success in customer relationships andCustomer Service Yeah? I think my background hasdefinitely helped me a lot, because when I did, I did my engineering incomputer science and engineering back. I graduated in two thousand and two.The only reason I took computer science and engineering was at that point.That's the only degree apart from dotor, where Ye will get a good job. So thatwas my only motivation to take that course. But by the time I finished myfourth year, I knew very well that I won't be able to quote so. I'm there. Iwas very poor in coding. So colding was something not for me. Then I starteddoing lecturing so I started ith my career as a lecturer in university andthen after three four years, my family situations changed. I moved to a different country.Teaching was not an option there at that point, so I start I startedlooking. What do I do next, then? I looked at testing as my nextopportunity to grow because I don't want to code. So with my testing background and mycomputer scigence background these two combinations put together when I talkto customers they when they ask something, I will be able to tell rightfrom that requirement, whether that's something that can be done from ouverproduct or not, because I know bit of the technicals technicality of theproduct as well. So when they ask me Orman May when my team comes and checkswith me, I tell them h. This might not be possible with our currentarchitecture, so we might need to tobble check with the development team,so I think definitely the testing career, which I did for quite some time.With my testing experience, we kind of...

...try to understand from the customerspoint of view what they are trying to get from us, so all the THREECA put together. I thinkI'm really enjoying the job. I'm doing right now, awesome for people who are listeningthat may be in sales or customer success. What are some tips you cangive them to understand their brothers and sisters in testing roles? You knowyou've obviously been on both sides of that. What can you maybe offer topeople that are operating in customer facing roles to help them understand,testing and testers in the testing process? Absolutely so when I was wdoing my test manager, Ote, sannalist role, one thing I always wanted to makesure is: I understood what they are telling me to do. So if a businessaeist gives me a spesipication document, I read through the document and need to make sure that I understandevery single point. That's mentioned in the document before when I start mytesting activity so to anybody who wants to take this as an opportunity, Iwould say you listen to what the customer wants and try to be in theirshoe. So imagine you are a customer and how would you like to get thatrequirement turned from a product to which feature, so you need tounderstand what you've been told to do or what you are doing so the moment youunderstand what you want or what you've been ussed to do. Everything elsebecomes easy. You know this is what you need to do. This is so you approach,and this is how you get get the oseltest. So for me, DOE's, not mullmany tips to give only one listen understand and then implement excellent.I have a feeling that Yoyou've kind of previewed where I wanted to go next,which is...

...you know the goal of this show, is tocreate more conversation across marketing sales and customer success,all in service of creating and delivering a better experience forcustomers- and you know, even when our organizations are very healthy from acultural standpoint. We can still get kind of Silod in our team, so I like tocreate a little bit of this kind of cross conversation. YEU've alreadytalked, I feel like Youhave, a very healthy relationship with your salesteam. But what do you wish more sales people knew or understood aboutcustomer success in customer service show. So, as I said, when you are doing sales,you should not focus on the sales, because, for me, sales is lost not atthe end or the hello, because for me the team were what we have here in Kobais not a sales team. It's a problem solving or a nurturing team. So youneed to say what the customers want and when do they want. How do they want andwhat are they expecting from you? So once you have an answer to all theselit mall how what Wen questions, then you need to treat yourself as okay. IfI were that customer, how would I react to this particular scenario? So you putyourself in their shoes and then you try to answer not to please them but toget what they want and always make sure you know they're payin points becausethey have a painpoint and that's why they've come to you. So you understand,if you I ou, don't know, ask ask them I'm not able to follow. You iseverything. Okay. Can you please tell help me a little bit more with anexample. The more question you ask to the customer upfront in the initialdays: The more answers you you don't need to feel at the end. You know whyyou lost the customer or why this...

...customer is not replying to my quereiquiries, because he initially the relationship is very, very important.You need to build the trust between you and your customers by asking morequestions. Once you have that feeling of I' been understood by my SDR orsalesperson, then your customer experience is a piece of cake, reallyinteresting, a thought that occurred to me and it's I don't think it's geniusat all, but in hearing you provide that response I mean I have this kind ofconcept that customer success starts on the sales side of the relationship.Would you say that that that's may be fair to say the SEOF? The customerstarts? I mean I actually. I know you do because I've heard you say itessentially in this conversation is and sorry to start o interrupt, but the work that you do ut front to understandthe customer. It starts at the very very beginning, and that is thebeginning of the success of the customer. Correct yeah. Many peoplethink that I've lost that customer, because I did not do my job properly idor I did not follow up with the customer regularly or I did not listento them so, but actually the sale is lost at your very initial conversationof or hello. So for me I always tell my team that your first few conversationwith your customers or prospects is to build that trust. So first you buildyour trust after that, whatever you tell in whatever manner, because thetrust is there al already, your customers will listen to you becausethey know that your initial hard work of listening to them is the and theTrustis builte. Again I'm coming back to this doctor example, because that'sone example I gave my team all the time you go to the doctor and you tell thedoctor your problem, because you know the doctor's doctor has got theexperience and they are ready to listen...

...and once you build the trust with thedoctor, the doctor, whatever the doctor prescribes, I'm sure you will consumewithout asking a single question right. So that's the level of trust you needto build with your customers and when right now, I'm not doing much ofsales activity, because we've got big teams and a lot of people to do the jobI was doing. But when I started with Kowaiy, I started from ground. So Istarted my career as a sale, ters SDR, and then we put the framework we put theprocesses and once it started rolling out, that's when we started taking morepeople and then are used to train them on all these things. So when even now Iget emaild from the customer, whom I was dealing eight years ago, so theemail will be very simple. They will simply say how I'm planning to buy youother product. How are you I'm so happy to see such Amais, because I'm nottalking to them every day, I'm not talking to them Om at all, because butthe sale was close, they are still using our product happy days. But whenyou see the customers coming to you and wanting to talk to you again and again,I think that's a that's a different pleasure. It is. I share that joy withyou. I you know I was the first marketer. I was the only marketingperson on the BOMBAM team for a couple of years years and years ago, and I'vesent a ton of email on behalf of the company for my personal email address,and so I'm still communicating with people who've been you know, we've beenour go to market was in about Thusanda Eleven, so we've been, you know,actively selling and supporting for about nine years, bow going on ten, and I have customers who I haven't,communicated with like you in like five six seven eight years who just reachout kind of cold. They maybe need something or want something or wherethey don't want to check in. But you know that relationship is still thereat some level and it he is a joy to be...

...in touch with as many customers aspossible, even over long periods of time. I want to get one more questionin before we go to a couple of my favorite questions of the entireconversation, because it's about the relationships you've built in your life,in your career, with brands and with people, but you know you host a podcastabout the knowledge base and you're interviewing all kinds of people. Yousaid they're from businesses, big and small for folks who have someresponsibility there or you know, part of their success, relies and having ahealthy knowledge base. What are a you tips or themes or emerging trends,anything that you'R hearing by hosting these conversations that might behelpful for people who are looking to improve the knowledge base. Experiencefor their customers, sure what they hear very often fromfrom I guest is. I always ask this question to them. What is yourdocumentation process at XS company AURIO company? Very often I hear, isthey get involved right from the beginning of product or discussion orproduct building stage, so documentation o creating your knowledgePacis, not the last step in your product Rolase. You need to getinvolved in various conversations wrigte at different levels. So whenyou're ready to launch your product or when you're ready to launch a release,you know exactly what you're writing and what your content is aimed at anagain coming to what customer persona your contents are going to be consumed,so the team involvement or the technical writers involvement is not atthe last stage, it's at every stages of the product or a release cycle and varyesteam. So it's just not with one team: they collaborate. They talk toinformation security team. They talk to project managers, they also to talk totheirr customer Support Team, because...

Customer Support Team is who thecustomers talk and the ticket conversations are happening on varioustechnical support right. So so this is something that lot of mygest shared with me and it'samazing, to say it kind of takes a different perspective to yourdocumentation team right. So you might be thinking okay, once the product isready, ready to be launched, the it gets to the product, documentation, team and theylook at the product and they do a documentation. That's not the case atall. Many companies either it be a small, small, one or large organization.The level of interaction is, is very deep and another thing. What I we found is whenwe started with this podcast. We never thought that we will have guests fromthese many different titles, so we have gest from Ui UX development. We havetechnical writer and we have documentation managers. So once once westarted interacting with all these guests, that's when we realizedocumentation is not a small por portion. You know it is. It is huge onits own and this Uyux ISS, a very upcoming area, I should say indocumentation. Excellent. Thank you for that two really interesting insightsinto the first one. In particular. It reminds me of so many things if we wantto do it well, we need to involve all of the stakeholders very very early andto create some crossfunctional teams, if not at least conversations andprocesses to facilitate success at the outcome, but it needs to start from thevery very beginning of you know. Let's say piece of product development reallygood. If you are listening to this conversation and you've enjoyed it,I've got a couple more that I think you will also enjoy episode. Seventeen withour chief customer officer at Bombom Jonathan Bolton. He built our CS teamfrom the GROUNDUP, including you know,...

...hiring and managing the folks that havebuilt our knowledge base and again that's episode. Seventeen with JonathanBolton JB, and we call that one, the best customer experience delivers anappropriate experience and then, more recently on episode. Seventy four wasStefh calledwell, who, at the time, had built two CS processes at cool softwarecompany in Chicago called Narrative Science. She since transitioned tosales. It was really interesting gowery to hear your background as n Sdr she'sgone the other way where she's built a couple CS processes and now is in salesand m. We called that using tech to scale the human touch, finding thatbalance of what jobs are appropriate for machines to do themselves, whatjobs should machines do to hand off to humans and what jobs should humans bedoing from the Getgo, and that was episode. Seventy four with steff calledwell gotery. This has been awesome and before I let you go, I want to do a fewthings and the first one is to give you the opportunity to think or mention aperson. Who's had a positive impact on your life for your career Youre. So Ithink I would like to thank my family members and they've never influenced me in any way,not in the wrong sense. They've. Let me do anything I want so when I wanted tobecome a lecturer. They let me explode that opportunity when I wanted to dotesting they'll. Let me do it then, when I want to to not work for sometime. They let me to it so, and so this level of freedom is really importantfor you to grow as a human as somebody whom you enjoy being so. I think Iwould like to tank my family members right from my momtil till my husband.So if I was told to do certain things in certain ways, I'm sure I might nothave enjoyed it, but what I'm doing right now is something that I wanted todo and that's really helping me to...

...bring the best out of me and in tern.It is also helping the company as a whole to bring the best sds to bringthe best customer Supporttin, because at the end of the day, I'll be happy.If I, if somebody can mmake what I was doingwithout without my presence, so that's that's what I feel as a sucess to me.That's awesome. I really appreciate that callout in that love and trust andsupport, allows all from the people around US allows us to be the bestperson. We can be that's awesome and how about giving a a thanks or amention to a company or a brand that you use as a customer that you reallyappreciate for the experience they deliver for you sure. So I think Iwould like to thank freshworks, because freshworks is a company we always lookup for if we want to do anything both on not the sale sor on the customer,support or customer happiness side. So the way they have grown as huge thelast ten years very similar to our growth like they started with oneproduct, then they slowly built many products surrounding the same ecosystem.So right now they have many products making sure that they all can be crosssold to the same customer base. So I think that's one pro one company we always. Iwould like to mention here because they've got a difficult, a brilliantstrategy to healp thei customers, excellent, and if someone wants tofollow upon this conversation, if they enjoyed it, if they want to learn moreabout you or about Covi or about document three six year, they want tocheck out the podcast whereare, some places that you would send people tofollow up on this sure always Kowinotcok. Just look at ourohistory page our growth.How did we start this a whole company...

...and we do a lot of community activities, sothere are a lot of white papers whatever product or you want thereare alot of white papers written by huge players in thei in the community, andyou can always email us contact at Koway DOTCO and you will get the requiet support fromus. So podcast, just drope me a linkdon message and I'll be there to host yoyou as a host has a guest super and for folks who are listening,we write up short writeups on all of these episodes. We drop in some videoclips, ane video highlights of these, and we also drop in links to some ofthe things that we talk about throughout the conversation. So if youdid not write those links down or you didn't write down, knowledge base andNinjas or you want to connect with gowry on linked an I'll have all thoselinks at Bombomcom podcast, and we do that for every episode. Gotry. Thankyou so much for your time. I enjoyed it very much and I hope you have a greatrest of your day. Thank you Ethan for this wonderful opportunity to talkabout my progress, the growth and the company. So I'm really looking forwardto see this going, live and yeah enjoy stay safe and take care of yourself andyour surround things: clear, communication, Human Connection, higherconversion. These are just some of the benefits of adding video to themessages your sending every day. It's easy to do with just a little guidance,so pick up the official book, Rehumonize Your Business, how personalvideos, accelerate sales and improve customer experience learn more in ordertoday at Bombam Com book, that's bomb, bombcom fuck, thanks for listening tothe customer experience. podcast remember the single most importantthing you can do today is to create and deliver a better experience for yourcustomers, continue. Learning the...

...latest strategies and tactics bysubscribing right now in your favorite podcast player, or visit Bombomcompodcast.

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