The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 3 years ago

15. You Have 100 Days to Create or Lose Lifelong Customers w/ Joey Coleman

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

You've got a hundred days to make customers for life.

Do you know what tools to employ to guarantee they’ll stay?

Joey Coleman does. He is a speaker and writer who's deeply steeped in the customer experience. He's the founder and chief experience composer at Design Symphony [TK: there is no URL for “Design Symphony” - this link is to his consulting website joeycoleman.com], and the author of Never Lose a Customer Again, Turn Any Sale into Lifelong Loyalty in 100 Days.

Coleman visited our podcast recently and shared his secrets to converting customers for life.

Golf and customer experience and customer service are used interchangeably, and I personally avoid that because I see customer service as being a reactive behavior. You're listening to the customer experience podcasts, a podcast dedicated to helping today's growing businesses restore a personal human touch throughout the customer life cycle. Get ready to hear how sales, marketing and customer success experts surprise and delight and never lose sign of their customers humanity. Here's your host, Ethan Butte. Congratulations, you've successfully brought on a new customer. But guess what? They are on the clock. You've got a hundred days to make them a customer for life. According to today's guest, who you are going to love, great energy, great insights. He's a speaker and writer who's deeply steeped in customer experience. He's the founder and chief experience composer a design symphony, something he's been doing for more than a dozen years. He's the author of one of the best books that I've read in the past year. Never lose a customer again. Turn any sale into lifelong loyalty in one hundred days. Joey Coleman welcome to the customer experience podcast. Thanks so much. He's, then, absolutely thrilled to be here. I am a huge fan of bombomb I'm a huge fan of the work you all are doing in the market place and was tickled bank when you reached out and ask to find like come on the show. It's a real honor, so thank you. Yeah, thank you for participating in and I didn't know how familiar you were with what we were up to and we're just chatting before we hit records. So I think we'll get into the power of video because in never lose a customer again. You really provide a number of different ways to employ it for that more personal and human touch. But will start here with where I always start, which is defined for me and for the listeners, customer experience. When I say customer experience, wors that mean to you? What is it, conjure? What are its characteristics? Yeah, so to me, customer experiences a feeling. It's the emotions that your customers undergo or navigate through or have thrust upon them by their interactions with you. I think often customer experience and customer service are used interchangeably and I personally avoid that because I see customer service as being a reactive behavior, what you do when something goes wrong or when the customer raises their hand and says I need help or I need something, whereas customer experience is a proactive activity. It's what you do, before the customer even raises their hand, or maybe even before they've become a customer, to make them have a deeper connection with your brand or your product or or offering, to make them have a more personal connection with who you are, what you're doing and the kind of build that into the actual touch points and interactions that you create for them. So you've offered something that's completely holistic. You've identified something that's really important. A lot of people, when we talk about how to implement customer experience, will punt it and leave it down in the customer success customer support team. Have you? You do a ton of speaking, teaching, consulting, writing in all of your consultation. Like, what have you seen or how do you advise people to raise it up out of these silo thing because even a really good company where people communicate well across teams and stuff, there's still a silo to Oh, he's a Sales Guy Oh he's a marketing guy. Oh she's a customer success person. How do we raise this up so that it is integrated from start to finish across these touch points? Sure? Well, I really appreciate that because I grew up in Iowa in a little farming community and you drive past any farm and you see lots of grain silos and silos are absolutely fantastic on a farm and they're absolutely horrific and an organization. I understand why they were created. I understand the benefits of the organizational hierarchy and creating departments based on function, but in two thousand and nineteen and beyond that just...

...doesn't work anymore because the customer wants you to have complete insight into their relationship with you. They don't want to be punted down the line to the next division or the next apartment. So I think it's important for your employees to be able to have a clear lens into the full scope of the relationship with the customer as it relates to the experience and how do we elevate that conversation out of customers six says. I think we have a couple of challenges historically that are starting to change number one. If you look at the bulk of CEOS and senior leadership teams, they came up through the ranks of sales or marketing. They didn't come up through the ranks of account management. It's not a criticism on how they got there, it's the reality of the path that, depending on who studies you look at, represents forty, two seventy percent of senior executives. So the CEO is predisposed to acquisition over retention just by the very nature of their own personal career. On top of that we throw economics. Economic shares that more money is spent on marketing and sales and acquiring that is spent on retention. So when many organizations, where the dollars go is where the attention goes, there's a predisposition to focus on bringing them in the door instead of keeping them once they've come in the door. The third problem we run into, and this gets to those silos issue, is in very few organizations is customer experience its own silo. Usually it's reporting up to whom sales are marketing, who are predisposed to talk about acquisition instead of retension. So we have hierarchical issues, we have structural issues, we have budgetary issues, and that doesn't even begin to be the tip of the iceberg. When we consider the phrase that for many years was the mantra and businesses around the world this is business, not personal, and so this belief that we were supposed to isolate feeling and emotion from a business interaction or people saying, Joe, you don't understand, we sell be to be. Okay, this is business to business. Well, folks, at the end of the day there's a human at the other side of that. This is ht H, this is human to human and the research actually shows that even in bbb setting, when a customer and to be to be environment makes a purchase, they still feel the same buyers remorse that a customer who makes an individually personalized purchase feels. And in fact the stakes may even be higher, because in your home life, if you purchase the wrong rice cooker, no one's getting fired. In Your Business World, if you sign up for the wrong crm software or by the wrong HR platform or by the wrong chairs for the office, you might end up losing your job based on your B tob purchase decision. So I think there's a lot of reasons why customer experience ends up not being a bigger part of the conversation. But what we're starting to see with the most cutting edge and progressive firms is elevating that role, creating a chief experience officer who supports directly to the CEO, not to another person in the C suite, so that voice of the customer, no pun intended, is being heard more often. So good, I think. The well, I'm just going to give you a line from the book to pick up on that. Was Right there. This, you know, you're talking about the connection which human connection, personal connection, personalized, customized. These are all words that are very well seen throughout the book. But you wrote to never lose a customer again, you must meet your customers where they are in their emotional journey. Talk about because you know where you are. Here is one really important aspect of connecting is empathy, and I read empathy. They're like this, meeting people where they are emotionally. It, to me, is the medium and more fun way to say empathy. Why is empath so important? I think you've already talked about why. It's hard. Right we're there's a cultural shift that needs to happen to be sincere and to practice real customer empathy as opposed to, you know, leaving a seminar and saying, like, I...

...heard about empathy and I feel different, like there's a gap there. And you talked about some of the historical structural foundations that prevent it. But you know, why is empathy so important and how are people doing that? Well, what does that look like in real life? Even I love that you alighted on the concept of empathy, because you're right, I don't refer to it by specific word necessarily in the book and that was a conscious decision on my part that I don't think we're there yet. I think we're close. That's going to be a future book because I think that empathy is going to become the great differentiator in business. And here's why. The computers, the AI, the robots, can figure out everything else very quickly and very easy the hardest thing, if you talk to AI researchers, for them to figure out is going to be empathy. And the problem is empathy, which, I would imagine you and I would agree, is one of the most useful skills as a human being to have, is a skill that, as in general, is not taught in any education model. If you want to find it in a book, you really have to look hard and what you usually get is something that is way overly technical about the science and psychology of emotion or very lip service. Oh Yeah, you need to be more empathetic. I think the benefit of empathy and a business setting is that it acknowledges the emotional journey the customers on. See, the most obvious place this shows up is right after the purchase. Now, I imagine all of your listeners are familiar, or the great majority are familiar, with the phrase buyers remorse. The research shows us that when we make a purchase, even though we're excited about the purchase, dopamine floods our brain. We feel joy, happiness, euphoria. This is going to be the product or the service. It's a answer to our dreams. Almost as quickly as we make that purchase, a clock starts ticking and is the dopamine recedes. Those feelings are of joy euphorian excitement are replaced by feelings of fear and doubt and uncertainty, in common parlance, buyers remorse. The problem with that from a business setting is, while we're all back at the head office high fiving and celebrating that we just landed the new client. The client is sitting in their office alone, wondering if they made the right decision. Word an emotional peak. They're in an emotional trough and if we don't acknowledge the Delta between those two points and take action to close the Delta between those two points, we're in for a pretty nightmarish ride going forward. Where one party in the relationship is feeling joy, you for any excitement, the other one is feeling feared out and uncertainty. And if you've ever gone to a horror movie with somebody who doesn't like scary movies, that's kind of a reference point, maybe from our personal lives or we can see they don't want anything to do with it. They want to get out of it as quickly as possible and if we don't address that we're in for problems. So you said we're on the clock in this scenario and part of the subtitle there's the hundred days. Is it? Is there magic to the first hundred days? It's about three months. It's a quarter, little bit more than a quarter to use. You know business. Sure outside of business, as anyone thinking quarters no, not that I'm aware. I think. I think football players may target. It's a completely different context. Right. So, yeah, talk about talk about the clock and talk about the hundred days. Maybe in this specific buyers or Morse Dyna make it, but be but even above that, like why, what does that window all about? Yeah, so the what fascinates me and that this is where the original genesis for the whole idea behind never lose a customer again came from. I found myself reading a study one night, and yeah, that's how exciting my life was, on bank retention, Bank customer retention, and what the study pointed out was the fact that thirty two percent of people who open a new bank account will have closed that bank account before the one year anniversary. I don't know if you've opened a bank account recently, then it's not fun. It's not a joy as it takes a long time. You have to go in in person, you have to show ID, have to give them money, you have to wait your old account to all the checks. Are The payments clear? You have to set up direct deposit, you have to get...

...a new ATM card, maybe new checks. It's not fun. And yet almost a third of those people leave before the one year anniversary. But what really got my attention is that over half of those people leave in the first hundred days. And I started looking at how banks behaved, and they reward new clients sign up bonuses somewhere between day ninety and one hundred. Why? Because they've learned that if they keep you today one hundred and one in the typical bank, they'll keep you as a customer for a minimum of five years. This sparked curiosity in me and it led me to say, if bankers, who is a general rule, usually pay pretty close attention to the bottom line and the numbers, are willing to accept thirty two percent annual churn, annual defection, what about folks that don't pay attention to the bottom line? And what I found in looking at industries around the world from every corner that you might imagine, is that somewhere between twenty and eighty percent of new customers will either actually leave your business in the first hundred days or will mentally check out and decide that when the term of their contract is over, they will not renew. I think this is the biggest threat facing business today that hardly anyone is talking about. Why? Because it's not as sexy to talk about retention is it is to talk about acquisition and as a result, companies are bleeding out their hemorrhaging off the side of their operations and nobody seems to be paying attention. Yeah, we call that selling out of a hole. I mean obviously as a software company on a subscription basis, monthly or annual. You know, it's obviously a big deal that we pay attention to and we look at it is selling out of a hole. It's like, why are we going to make acquisition build the company out of a hole? And we need it. Yeah, it's tough. Well, and what's interesting in the software come industry, if I may, the group of people that have figured this out the most are the VC's that specialize in software is a service, because if you look what's happening in Silicon Valley and in the VC world, they are giving enhanced valuations to companies that have smaller churn rate. It's the first time that across an entire industry this is happening at scale and the valuations are anywhere from three to five x greater for a company that has a lower churn rate than the exact same product with a higher churn rate. So they've figured it out and, as the old line in DC's and politics goes, follow the money wherever the money is going. That's usually the trend that you want to be part of, which is paying more attention to your churn and defection so important because it speaks to all the things that to me, if you have a very, very low churn rate, it's not just about the churn rate in the ability to stack the revenue in the SASS model, even though it is the upstream implications of that, or that you're doing so many things well that you must be a well run company. You know who's providing a great customer experience. So, and that's just the outbound perception. What about the internal perception of employee experience? So what we find is that we enhance customer experience, we by default enhance employee experience. They're two sides of the same coin, and so as your customer retention increases, your employee retention increases. And we look at two of the biggest line item costs in most businesses. It's the amount of money they're spending on people and the amount of money they're spending on marketing and sales. So if I can help you improve the margins in both of those, I dramatically increase the overall profitability of your organization. And we don't even so. For the being counters, that makes them happy, but for the people who have hearts, not to say that being counters don't, it makes them happy because they feel better about coming to work. Morale goes through the roof and I will say that is the thing that I have noticed the most from companies who have implemented the methodologies I talked about in the book and if implemented a first under day strategy, the number of personal messages I get from readers and people have been in the audience when I speak. That's a joey. The thing that shocked me was I'm keeping my employees. My employees are more excited to come to work, they're coming up with better ideas, they're going the extra mild, they're doing more and...

...it's like wow, the correlation and the connection between these two is so strong, but most companies never get to that conversation. Yeah, it's pride in ownership where you can flip that switch with half or two thirds or three quarters of the team members. It's just a it's a positive upward spiral or a halo, a factor, whatever you want to say to like we're getting more good than we ever thought out of it. So good, so in the book, one of the things that got me excited, and thank you again for mentioning your awareness and appreciation of what we're doing with our business, you talk a lot about video and that got me so excited because it's something I've been thinking about and talking about and practicing and teaching for years myself. But you know you do it through your we don't. We won't get into the details of your eight part framework. I recommend that you go out in purchase to this is for the listeners, not you joey it. I can see you already have a couple of couple copies here. I cannot recommend highly enough. Never lose a customer again. It's fun to read, it's super practical and there's an eight part framework from before this person is even close to being a customer all the way through retention and advocacy, and it's a really smart play. But what got me really excited about weeding it just what let me up was all the applications that you saw for video. Can you talk a little bit about you gave in the book, at the end of every chapter, really provocative questions and really practical next steps around you basically make give video equal footing as in person, email, on the phone, etceter you break down the different channels that we can use to connect and communicate with people and you give video equal weight, which I haven't seen in a book like yours before. So I I was just excited to ask you about video a little bit. What, what about video is so exciting for you and what are some of the great moments in a well delivered customer experience that that you've seen that really got you excited? Well, a couple of thoughts on that Ethan. Number One, I think video is uniquely positioned halfway between the digital world and the analog world, and what I mean by that is it gives us the closest proximation of an in person meeting without having to be in person. So it gives us all the benefits of being able to do connection at a distance and at scale without needing to physically go there, but because they can actually see us and they can watch our body language and see our enthusiasm and see the way we're moving, because, depending on who studies, you look at you know what, sixty to ninety percent of what we read and why we trust someone to appreciate them is what we can see visually. It allows us to bridge that gap. Number two, and part of the reason I love what you've done with bomb moomb is it's a technology that is actually pretty easy to use and your software makes it incredibly easy to use in an era where it's only recently become easy to use. It used to be if you want to send a customer a video, you better have a fulltime videographer on staff to shoot the video, to edit the video, to add music and etc. Whereas now the research actually shows, at least in a sales context, he had held selfie video shot on an Iphone, with poor light being an adequate sound, converts better than a studio shot video. Why? Because it feels more authentic, it feels more real. Additionally, we're at a weird time in human history where right now, video sent via text message right so either facetime videos or some quick shot video that's texted over are generally reserved for communications with immediately immediate family members. Being on the road and sending a video back home for the kids to watch, connecting on facetime with Graham and GRANDPA on Sunday night, whatever it may be. So we're at this interesting conflux or period in time where these type of personal videos are normally reserved for family and there's barely a company on the planet that I can't go to their website and find some mention of the fact that when you become a customer of...

...ours, you become achncorp family. We consider you as family. That kind of messaging, the fact that we might use a communication tool that's already predisposed or subpossos to be a tool for family members in a business context, I think takes the relationship to another level very quickly. Then, when it comes to examples of company using videos, oh my gosh, you're right. I mean there's forty six case studies in the book. I tried that from small, medium and large companies from all around the world. I tried to pick companies that were doing really creative things. Couple quick touches. Number One, there's a company called Zajek's that's an online ECOMMERCE business that makes Jim wipes okay, I don't know if you've ever been in the gym working out and you've seen the residue to do with the human who worked out before you on the bench. Well, Jim Wipes allow you, in an environmentally friendly, antiseptic way, to clean off that bench. So there is an a nonvoluntary DNA transfer. Okay, they sell their Jim Wipes online. You go online. There are many businesses that sell online that are dying to have a human connection with their customers right because they never meet them in person. What sajects does is that is brilliant, is the day that you buy, they send you a confirmation email. Now a lot of ECOMMERCE companies send confirmation emails Zagics in beds of video that has a picture and or a gift of the employee holding a clipboard that says thank you ethan or thank you joey or thank you the name of the customer right. So immediately you see that is the thumbnail you want to click play right in the same way that you're hold up a sign right now, you've got to you know on a day exactly, so if somebody holds up that video, they're going to watch and what they do is that watching the video? It just thanks him from the order it's personally shot. It's less than a minute long. Here's the interesting thing. There's actually a mistake in the book, and every author hates it when there's a mistake in the book right, but it's the nature of publishing. About two weeks after the book came out, the CEOS objects called me and he goes, Joey, we gave you the wrong data. I'm like, Oh man, are you kidding me? What's from? Me Goes, we gave you the wrong data on how many of the people that get the confirmation video actually watch it. And I was like, Oh, and I'm my stomach just drops. He says, yeah, we didn't have it properly connected on the back end. So is it turns out the number we gave you was too small. It's seventy eight percent of our customers watch the video completely on a confirmation video. None of your listeners that work in ECOMMERCE. No. The typical read rate on a confirmation email is somewhere between four and eight percent across all industries. If you've got a seventy eight percent watch to completion rate with somebody that you have no relationship other than they just gave you some money to buy your product that they've never received or never tried before. You're doing something right. So that's one example of a company that is incredibly using video in a way that I don't think many companies are using video to create that kind of personal and personalized connection really early in the first hundred days. I like that you drew out their personal versus personalize. It's a line I like to draw out a lot. Like to me, I use personalized for the very a variable data inserts or the really nice netflix email like hey joe, you watch the first five seasons of parks and rack. Guess what season six is available? Might like it, and I do, and that's awesome. It's personalized, it's super relevant. I forward it to my wi or you might forard it to your wife or whatever, and and you know it's really helpful. But this personal element where you let someone know that it's just for him or her. Just walk that out for people, because I think one of the themes I want to explore in these conversations with smart people like you is, you know, we need to be able to scale our businesses and in so personalized and customized, machine driven, even if there's a human touching it at some point, is great. But when, when, in a scale business, can we afford to get truly personal, because I think a lot of people say, well, I don't have time for that, I can't afford...

...that, of course, implied in everything you share so far. Focus. I don't know that you can afford not to do it right. Exactly. All right, right, but but coach people. Coach people into that a little bit like when, when can you rely on the machine and when you need a real human to put a real moment into the experience in the life cycle. Yeah, I mean at this point even I think it's probably more art than science. It's difficult to know exactly when you need to do it. But I'll tell you how I usually see it play out. Typically, when somebody starts a business, they are hyper personal in their communications. Why? Because they have one or two customers they can afford to be. They have all the time in the world. They've finally got someone to sign on for their product or their service and they're holding that person very carefully in the palm of their hand, creating personal communications with them in every touch, right there, right there. But then, if we found our job right, our business grows and we start to have some level of success, we hire more employees, which by default makes the connections less personal, because you have more people serving the same client, people serving the client who they may never meet or may not even know is serving them behind the scenes, not to mention we have more clients. So then we have a tendency to shift from the personal to the personalized. In the ideal scenario, we create more generic things that are personalized or we use machine learning or ai to be able to make messages that feel personalized, like the Amazon and Netflix recommendations. But we all know is a computer doing that, not a human. In my experience, the best companies are the ones that come full circle that. Once that is established, they layer new I sing on top of it. That brings it back to the personal and now they call out the specific messages. It doesn't take that much to send a personal message to a client once a quarter. It really doesn't, even if you just said all the clients I'm responsible for. Today is the third Friday of the second month of the quarter and this is my personal day where all I'm going to do is shoot videos and send custom messages or custom emails or call my clients are go visit them in person and I'm going to really make it about them, not me. You don't have to do this all the time. The pushback I get from most folks is jo you can't do this at scale, it's too hard. When you know what business is hard. That's what you've signed up for. If you don't want to sign up to be in busit there's a lot of other jobs you can go do that aren't as hard as running a business. Okay, and I think you need to. Most business owners need to do a better job of empathizing and teaching their employees about the importance of this, because here's something I've come across recently to I've observed this for a while, but it kind of got brought into the big picture very recently. You can't ask your employees to create a remarkable experience for your customers if they have no idea what a remarkable experience is. And the bar for customer experience, at least in the United States, and I would pose it globally, is lying on the ground. Okay, there's the typical person has very little context. Quick story in how this came up. I was working with a CEO. He wanted to bring me into work with this whole team. He said, Joey, we want to deliver first class Ritz Carlton White Glove Service. It said Great. We got everybody together. I said here's a question. Before we start the daylong workshop, I'd like to ask some questions and raise your hand if this applies to you. How many of you've ever flown first class? The CEO proudly raised his hand, the head of sales raised his hand. No one else raised their hand. As a great how many of you've ever stated or Rich Carlton? The CEO raised his hand, the see or the head of sales put the hand down and no one else had their hand up. He said okay, last question. How many of you have ever had a meal where it was delivered by waiters wearing white gloves? Even the CEO put his hand down. I turned to the CEO and I said it's very difficult to ask our team to deliver first class rich Carlton White Glove Service if they don't know what that is. And I think the same thing applies to every business. If you want your employees to deliver remarkable experiences. You need to be a remarkable employer. You need to deliver remarkable experiences to them and...

...once they have the taste, they're going to want to pay it forward, they're going to want to give it to other people and they're going to have a context for what that looks like and they're above all, they're going to know how it feels to be on the receiving end. And once I mean you said it before, he said it before. I just put it together now. Like knowing how it actually feels and being able to a recognize how fun and exciting it is to experience it and then, on the other side, how fun and exciting it is to watch people experience it or get those email replies or to get those unsolicited pieces of feedback from your customers as you're doing this. It's just lights them up. I love this, this theme of this relationship between employees and customers and having to model the behavior right and being able to experience it. That the best way to deliver great customer experiences deliver great employee experience. It reminds me the service profit chain, which is a really great research piece that links all of these things. It starts with internal service, quality and hiring, interviewing, hiring, on boarding, training, equipping everybody well produces that loyalty and satisfaction that they may in turn light the customers up on, and it he gets the things that we spend all of our time focusing on, which is revenue growth and and those types of long down the line outcomes. But it starts exactly where you are, right here, with employees who truly understand what it feels like to receive what the boss is asking to be delivered. Now I think it's easy for people to especially with all the great stories you tell, to say, well, you know, this happiness, surprised, delight, wow moment thing is what we're really shooting for. But I feel like what is overlooked often times when we talk about customer experience and share some of these stories, is that is the desired result or the desired outcome. Can you talk about the role of that? It's not like well, give them the result and then surprise and to like them like. Try about the relationship there so that no one misses the site that this isn't just about doing crazy, delightful over thetap stuff for people. It's actually giving people exactly what they paid for absolutely well, and I appreciate that distinction, Eathan, because let's say you go out to a really fancy restaurant and you order your meal and the waiter comes over and he says, Mr Coleman, it's my pleasure to present you with your meal, but it's the wrong meal. I don't care how nice the lead in sends was, I'm not happy. I'm not getting what I ordered. When I originally put together the eight phases of the customer journey, I'll be honest, there were only seven and a good buddy of mine, Muchel port, fellow author speaker, heard me speaking and he's like, Joey, I think you're missing a face. And I sat with that, I kid you not, for almost a year. was about nine months, and I was in the process of writing the book and I'm like, what am my missing? What am I missing? And I realized I was missing phase six of the eight phases, the accomplished face. And what dawned on me is it was so obvious to me, and I don't say that from a place of Ego, that you had to deliver the product or the service they wanted, that I admissed that many companies don't do that right, and so I went back and I looked at it and the accomplished phase is what happens when a prospect decides to do business with you, back when they're just kick and tires in the marketing and sales part of the relationship or, as I call it, the assess part of the phase. They have a goal in mind, they have something they're hoping to accomplish. If you don't navigate them through to accomplishing that goal, they will never become a doctor, they will never be loyal, they will never become an advocate referring new business to you. So you have to get that done and you have to remember that that's what we want to deliver. That's what we want to focus on. We need to keep eyes on the prize that we have these surprise and delight moments around it in how we deliver it. But if we don't get them to the finish line, we haven't achieved this. Good Buddy of mind, Phil Jones, who's also a fantastic speaker and writer in the sales space, was recently. I was in...

...the audience. Why he was speaking and he was telling this analogy about a wedding dress. So when somebody's buying a wedding dress, if you ask people who sell wedding dresses, what is the person hoping to accomplish? What is the finish line? It's wearing the wedding dress on the wedding day, but that would be incorrect. Really what they're hoping to accomplish is to get the photos back from the wedding day and believe that they looked beautiful in that dress. So if we're move on our way to the finish line, but our customer has a different idea of what the finish line is and it's ten yards past where we are, it's like trying to sprint in a hundred yard race and stopping at the tape. That's a mistake. All the best world class runners run through the tape. They said, a finish line ten yards behind what the person actually wants. So, if nothing else, I think looking at what the customers said they want and really deciding if that's really what they want or if there's something further beyond that. That should be your internal target that you're trying to get them to. That singular shift in thinking I've seen revolutionized businesses and how they operate and treat their customers. I think running through the tape is such an easy and powerful visual piece. You know if you're running through the tape you're hitting the end of the race as defined right and in this case, hitting the desire to result at full speed, right, and so that the caution of not running through the tape is like you're going to slow down and maybe not even get there. You wrote a line toward the end of the book and it made me. It jumped off the page to me and it made me think. Well, it reminded me of how I think about some of the work that I'm doing every day and what gets me really excited and he keeps me coming back as excited as I was seven years ago, and it's this remarkable customer experiences have the potential to create a happier world. That this work. It's not just about providing satisfied employees, although that is part of making a happier world. It's not just about making happier customers, although that's part of a happier world. It's not just about hitting your financial targets, which is also part of a happier world for you and whoever you report up to and whoever that person reports out to. Why did you take it to such a high level and what do you mean in that statement? Because it feels really big to me and aspirational and it just got me all it up. Why? I appreciate that, because that was the intention with which it was written, and I will tell you that some of the people that read the book in advance pushed back on it a little and we're like, Joey, you're getting a little Hoogie Pooja. You've been really tactical, you've been strategic, you've been given US case studies how to do questions, and now at the end, you're going to get all soft and fluffy. Why is that? Why else are we here? Why else do we get up in the morning? Why do we choose to leave the people we love the most, our spouse or significant others, are children, are friends, and go to an office or log on to work and do something all day, every day? If not to improve the planet, if not to improve our place in the planet, our friends place in the planet, our clients place in the planet, are Co Workers Place in the planet? I really believe that it has the opportunity to make for a happier planet. And here's wine. It's not just a soft statement. You hinted at it before. We live in an era where, if we look at a technology analysis, we are more connected than in any other time in human history. I've had the opportunity in the last two weeks to literally fly to the other side of the world and meet people who I had never met other than through Linkedin. I've had the opportunity to jet back and forth here, there and everywhere to do zoom calls, skype calls, connect with all kinds of people who I've never met and never will meet. And yet, if you look at what the psychologist and the psychiatrist are saying in the social scientist,...

...we have never had a time in human history where humans felt more disconnected, alone, vulnerable, unheard. And so I think there is an opportunity, by creating remarkable experiences, to have our fellow humans feel, even for a moment that they matter, to have them experience something unexpected that says, even though we've never met, even though you just purchased something from me, it would normally be seen as a transactional interaction. I'm going to do my best to make a smile to make you laugh, to make you feel like you matter. That, I think, is a huge, big audacious goal that is actually really easily attained on a case by case, person by person basis. So good. I just want to let that at a minute. That like it's exactly right. I mean, why are we doing all the things that we're doing? And it's one of our deepest human needs, of course, is to connect with other people. And and to your point of it's not personal, it's business. It's not business, it's personal. Like this separation. It's so nice to have someone out there who's consulting with some of the biggest companies on the planet that are really setting the tone for what business culture is like today, and know that you're in those rooms helping drive and provoke in this way. And I think there's a lot of kinship out there too. I mean our mission, as stated on our website, is to rehumanize your business by helping you rehumanize your communication, to put the Messenger back into the message. But are nonstated or not publicly stated, goals to rehumanize the planet. We want people to work in a more personal and human way and to get those connections that you're talking about. I mean when you can't fly halfway around the world to meet those people. I've always called it be there in person. When you can't be there in person, you know more recently it's make any email as warm, personal and effective as an in person appointment. So there's a lot of kinship here. A I could obviously go all day because I have fourteen more questions that I just lined out in case. I didn't expect that I would, and I didn't. Relationships are our number one core value here, and so I always like to give folks who spend this kind of time with me and with our listeners a chance to think or mention someone who's had a positive impact on his or her life or career in to prop up a company that's doing some of these things that you think are important in delivering customer experience. Do someone who's doing it a good way. So give anyone you like to shout out. Oh Wow, they're you know, it's kind of like asking somebody who has multiple kids to name their favorite. All right, you know it's a challenge. There's so many. I mean, as I mentioned, there's forty six that are in the book. There's read your dead hundred sounds like as the yeah, it's funny. The dedication. It's engine bring that up. The the acknowledgements at the end of the book were sixteen pages long and when I did that, the publisher was like you need to cut this down a little, and even my agent, I love my agent dearly, it's like, Joe, you're going to write more books, and I was like, but on the off chance that I don't, if I get hit by a bus, if something goes awry, I need to thank all the people that brought me to this place, because it wasn't just the people here in the last year or two years or five years or almost twenty years that I've been doing customer experience. It was all of those people. So there's so many folks to mention. Let me take this in two different directions. If I made the recovering attorney, and me always likes to answer a question by changing the question and making the rules fit my own way. People that somebody inspires me in a business and inspires me there the business has people that inspire me too, but will do two different approaches. So the person who inspires me, I'm going to go right now with my two sons Laughlin and chillon. They are five and three. What inspires me about them is they are one hundred percent experiential, one hundred percent all day, every day, morning, noon and night. You have to be present with them, you have to be creating experience with them,...

...you have to be created in connection with them. They are a daily and regular reminder of what the actual standard in human humanity is when we start, and then it gets trampled and tamped down over time and we begin to accept less. I want to change that. I want to get it back to what it was when we were kids. In terms of a company, there's a fairly new brand, I'd say they've been in business for about maybe eighteen months, hopefully I'm getting that right, called Pela case. PELA case they make an environmentally friendly, one hundred percent compostable cell phone case. Their story is absolutely incredible about why they do this and I think more and more. I'M gonna go on a little rand if I can. Ethan, if we sit around and wait for the governments of the world to solve these environmental crisis, we all get to burn together. I'm sorry. I worked in politics, I grew up in politics, I love politicians. I know that sounds crazy, but I love the service ethic of government, but it is moving so slow in a world that is moving so fast that it is far past the time for businesses to take the lead on this. In my personal APP in it, Pela case is one of these companies that said look, we're not going to sit around anymore. People are buying cell phone cases and every time they get a new cell phone, of course it's a different model and a different design into different size, so they have to throw out the phone and the case. We're going to create a case that, instead of throwing it out, you planet in the backyard. It's compostable, you can grow stuff in it and I love companies that are doing that and their story has caught fire. They are growing at an incredible rate and one of the reasons I love them as a company is, and hopefully he's okay with me sharing this publicly, the CEO just reached out to me as a buddy of mine and we've known each other for a while as friends. We've never formally worked together, and he said, can we get on the call, because I want to talk about how to do customer experience at scale. What do we do when we are selling in retail stories around the world and online and offline, and we know who some of our customers are but we don't know who all of them are. How do we get them engaged, not only as customers and inexperience, but engaged in our mission of making a better planet? That's the kind of conversation that has me excited. That's the kind of conversation that I think the most forward thinking and successful businesses on the planet are starting to think about, and that's why PLA case is somebody that I'm paying attention to. So good and you're exactly right. I could. I could monolog as well about the role and really the responsibility and the opportunity to business has to solve so many problems and in I don't know if you read the responsible company from Avannechoinard and the CMO at Patagonia, but it's problems on an industrial scale can be solved on an industrial scale and government regulation is not solving problems on an industrial scale. We do need some of it anyway. Oh we yeah, of course. So, like, I don't really need to go. We need to counter it with something other than high paid, high powered lobbyist who write loopholes in so that the biggest offenders can get out. And that's not just me going on an environmental rant for anybody that's on the other side. I'm just asking you to look at your own personal consumption and ask yourself, is that more or less than your parents, and is it more or less than your grandparents? All the statistic show it is exponentially more. Oh, when there's more people. So at some point something breaks. I don't know about you, it's getting hotter in the summer, it's getting colder in the winter. I don't like that and that makes me nervous. Well, and in addition to is it more than your parents, is it more than you need? Right, like, totally, totally want is a thing and wed and there's some there's some upside to satisfying some of your wants and...

...scratching some of these more superficial itches, but the conflation of wants and needs I think drives a lot of the lot of the trouble that we're in. Agreed. Okay, now, I mean I need to drive up and spend an ESPEC. Whatever time you have for you, let's do it. Let's do what I'd love to. Okay, Hey, before we let you go, thank you for that. By the way, how can people will connect with you? What's the best way to learn more about never lose a customer again, to connect with you, to learn more? If it's a few of these ideas were really citing or inspirational for people, what's the next step they can take? Sure a couple ways. Number One, the book is called never lose a customer again. It's available everywhere. You might buy a book. We've got a hardcover, we've got an Ebook, I always say on podcast. We also have an audiobook, which you've enjoyed listening to me. I actually narrate the audio books, so I will read you the book as you go to sleep or as you work out. So happy to have you check that out. That be amazing. I also have a podcast called the experience. This show, it's a weekly show about thirty minutes, where we do little snippets of Customer Experience Delight. We tell the positive stories. We're all about celebrating the businesses, the organizations, the nonprofits, the governmental entities that are doing remarkable things that need to be celebrated, and we have got a lot of different segment types. We have some fun with that. The best way to connect with me is on my website. It's Joey Colemancom. Joey like a five year old. You probably know somewhere Coleman cool em an, like the camping equipment, but no relation Joey Colemancom. There you'll find a more information about me, my work, blog, post videos, etc. And would love to have more people join the conversation because my goal is to raise that bar that is I described is on the ground and the way it's going to get raised is by more people not only expecting remarkable experiences when they do business with other ouranizations, but delivering remarkable customer experiences to their customers, their friends and their family alike. So good, an important mission and your obviously sincere about it. In your enthusiasm is contagious, and so thank you for those opportunities for folks to follow up. Hey, if you're listening to this and you enjoyed the time you spent with Joey Coleman today, it would be so helpful to me and to the podcast into other people who need to hear this conversation ones like it. To go leave a review at Apple podcasts or itunes. I appreciate you so much for listening. Thank you, Joey, for your time. I really, really enjoyed it, and continued success to you. Thanks, Youthan. Appreciate being on the show. You're listening to the customer experience podcast. No matter your role in delivering value and serving customers, you're entrusting some of your most important and valuable messages to faceless digital communication. You can do better. rehumanize the experience by getting face to face through simple, personal videos. Learn more and get started free at bomb bombcom. You've been listening to the customer experience podcast. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player or visit bombombcom. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (201)