The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

16. Quick Ways to Create Trust with Your Customers w/ Charles Green

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Trust matters when it comes to customer experience.

People line up at the Apple Store’s Genius Bar in part because they’ve come to trust that they will get a great customer experience.

Whether you’re a B2B or B2C, how can you create trust with your customers?

To find the answers, I spoke with Charles H. Green, CEO of Trusted Advisor Associates. He's the author of Trust-Based Selling: Using Customer Focus and Collaboration to Build Long-Term Relationships and The Trusted Advisor Fieldbook: A Comprehensive Toolkit for Leading with Trust.

For Charles, you create trust by focusing on building a long-term relationship instead of focusing on the current transaction.

Charles suggests that you engage in active listening to make your prospects and customers feel like you understand how they’re feeling.

As a gross rule in business in life,you should focus more on relationships than on transactions. If you do that,the transactions come fairly. Naturally, you're listening to the customerexperience podcast a podcast dedicated to helping today's growing businessesrestore a personal human touch throughout the customer line cycle, getready to hear how sales marketing and customer success experts surprise anddelight and never lose sign of their customers. Humanity here is your hostEfen Beaute, all right. We are going deep on thisepisode of the customer experience podcast into trust, because we have oneof the foremost experts entrust Charles Green CEO of trusted advisor associateshe's been running that company for more than two dozen years he's the author ofthe trusted advisor the trusted advisor Fieldbook, trustbase selling, Charliewelcome to the customer experience podcast. Thank you, eeen pleasure, tobe here. We are obviously going to go deep on trust. It seems like it's yourlife's work and Gosh. If you're going to dedicate yourself to something, Ican't think of too many other better themes, but I always like to start witheveryone, because I think the definitions very depending on what seatyou're in and what experience you've had when I say customer experience whatcomes to mind? What do you think about what are some of his characteristics? Gee, I, what comes to my mind and I'mbiased, of course, because of that perspective on trust, but it's Iimmediately think full band with connection. Do I understand this personas a human thing, or is this he had another transactional interaction witha nameless, faceless person. So to me it's an Obrane for most relationshipsin business. I focus mostly on BTB, but it's also TRIBC. You want to have somekind of human connection if you're able to do that, business and life just getsa Wale lot better. So for you, then, if you're going to deliver a good customerexperience, there needs to be a a...

...trustbased component, that is, that istruly human to human yeah. I mean there well thereare some things, let's faceit, where you know we don't mind not having a toller we'd rather go to aNedian. We don't mind either facing Wyt Bamazon on the web, because we don'twant personal interactions but short of a lot of things that don't require muchyeah. We do need people and we don't spend money. We don't make bigdecisions with howout some kind of connection, so it is cre. It's funny. Ijust had a conversation with a couple people that conjured my own experiencewith Amazon. Just because you mentioned it where we were just working so hardto get a phone number, because we had a question that wasn't easily resolvedthrough the intervace. You have to really work for it, but you can stillpick up a phone and speak to it. Hatis correct, Heyaer, very deeply, but it isthere yeah and and it's a great helpful human on the other side. So even forthose systems that are ninety nine percent, automated ind machines rivenpersonalized, albeit but still machine, driven, that personal touch is critical.So I one thing there just to touch on it. You mentioned that the person atthe other end when you findli got them, was really compedent. So many companiesunder invest in confident Super Helpful, great people on the other end of thephone, I can't think of a better place to overanvast than that person. GreatCall, that's the entire premise of the service profit chain is, if you put allof your investment up front in internal service quality and people, hiringrecruiting onboarding training, equiping them and continue to buildinto them. Everything else falls out from there yeah. So your theme is obviously trust. Justbe specific. Why is trust so fundamental to the customer experience? Well, if trust I is of human response to riskreality, then you know almost any action in life is there is a riskimpoduct to it. You step out the door across the street. You need somebodyknew and we're not. We like to think that we're rational, calculating VRAINIacts all the time, but the trip is...

...where you know a protein based lifeform so have been evolved for eons to deal with the unknown, and one of thegreatest ways is really trust we very quickly suss out. Can I trust thisperson with respect to this with respect to that and it's as true intoday's sophisticated BTB businesses as it is, you know a hundred years ago onthe frontier, we still don't like to make decisions that are critical: Andeinvolved money, Hego careers and all that stuft without having somesensitive trust. If it's there, it helps a lot, because it's absent you'redealing with phrice and featurs, and it's not a very great way to Hann yourrelationships on. That's excellent, there's almost a you're almost making them one and thesame like human relationship and human connection. That trust is inseparablefrom a healthy one. Well, that's really true in you know the way trust work,it's kind of reciprocity, think about a handshake. You reach out of handshaketo someone automaticaly. Ninety nine point: Nine of them are going to returnyour handshape that gesture of reciprocity gets replicated across allkinds of little interactions that have to do with etiquete and an custom, andit works that way in business in trust too. If I take a risk and trust youguess what you're going to do. If I treat you well juess what you're goingto do, if I treat yoo badly just what you're going to do, and so crust is aseries of ways in which we craft this very fundamental person, interactionwith each other. He do it right if Wy the game right together, he wend uptrusting each other and a infinite number of things go better. He do itwrong. He got to O pith low trust, and you know the same. Infinite number ofstuff goes down awesome like just a preview to the people. Listening. Weare going to get to relationships that have gone bad because there's somechances to save it, and there are other times when you just need to cut theline. But let's go here, you know for someonewho's, maybe hasn't been intentional or conscious about trust and Hi Gosh. Youknow, should I you know raise this up...

...as an important thing for myself or myteam, or whatever just talk about some of the obvious and maybe not so obviouseconomic or social or ethical benefits, of of focusing on trust and building itinto some of your processes with intention yeah. So, let's see on, we ran aloff.Let's do it in kind of a sales environment. Just to pick one metaphor:it it happens across customer service, but other things to it. But let's,let's just pick sale. If your potential customer trust t you a lot deeply.Think of all the things that happen, hey a more like Wu o by, for you, bether less likely to push back on price, see the more likely to be open andshare with you all the issues that are really going on dee e, more likely togive you refernals and references whatever letter we're up to they'reless lifely to challenge your statements, they're more likewhen, itcut you some slack. If you make a mistake, they're more likely to forgiveyou and it goes out on on a not Stephen Amark cuby junor has sort of Competitivor mind in the author of the Stede of trust, an excellent book as a verysimple statement. He says what trust is present. Things go faster and cost less.When Trust is absolute, things go slower and cost more ow that covers awaterfront omutions. I think he's done a brilliant job of summarizing it. Soyou know ther're, just a touch a few of the things that happen better whenthere's a trust based relationship, I loved your list there and I'm sureyou could have gone on and on and on Wi more elemens, because it's just soagain, fundamentally human as a need, but you really summarize it nicelythere. How does someone lead with trust? How do you raise it up? What are someof the activities or actions someone can take in order to build trustquicker and to communicate again, as you said, like the way I my pastorewith you and the way I treat you is going to affect Tho, we look back andtreat me et ce. What are some things? Who can do to to show those signs thatbuild trust, and that demonstrate that...

I trust you right. We should mention athing called the trust equation at some point W, which touches on severalthings, but I'd say one thing stands out. Above all, there is a long list ofthing. Ver One stands out and that's very simple: It's to do a really greatjob of listening to the other person and it's a particular kind of listening.I mean hardly the first person this hey listening is important, but I'm nottalking about listenings that give Yo twenty questions to find out the answer.I'm not talking about listening to Tesho Hypothisis, I'm not talking aboutactive, listening, mirroring listening, it's a particular kind of listing andit is to make the other person feel heard to make sure that the otherperson feels yes, you get. You were paying attention to me. You understandwhat I would say and to go back to that reciprocal feature, that's built intous as humans when somebody feels that way. What do they do? They were termegthe jesture they emotionally say well, good now tell me about you and theybecome much more wwilling to listen. So there's a paradox at the heart of thisstuff. If you want to be good at selling, if you want people to takeyour advice, if you want people to take you seriously, the best thing to do isshut up, and listen to that. So, ironically, you know talking more isthe wrong thing, listening more induces them to listen when it's your term. Sothat's just so far above everything else. There are a whole ton of otherthings, but that really deserves singling out something you write andspeak about is curiosity. Talk a little bit about the role of curiosity here, yeah, we have a little top tim list puttogether years ago of things to do and te that's number one you know cultivatean attitude of curiosity. For one thing, one of the one of the big trust killersis what we call high self oentation, which comes into flavors either itsselfishness. You know, hey, don't trust, people who are selfish, but that'sreally obvious. We don't run into a lot of selfish people in business. Sothat's not a common problem. The one that is comn is if people who are reshup in their own heads, they're,...

...neuronically self obsessed when they'repretending to talk to a customer, they're, really thinking. Oh my gosh,am I going to get the sale that they like me? Do they not like me? Are theylistening to me or they not lekt you to me. You know how come everybody'swatching me up from nobody's watching all that stuff get you wrapped up inyour own head and the other person can feel we know when somebody's actuallypaying attention and listening to us. So we know what they're not ind,curiosity training yourself to have an attitude of curiosity, one of thewonderful side effects is it can't be self obsessed if you're focused on theother person if you're curious about the other person, so it works on anemotional lel. It works ot, a very rational level. If you're curious,you're going to come up with a bunch. Your questions and questions are great.You know you ask your customers, clients and good questions. Theyreflatter. You learn something you build a connection and it just works on awhole bunch of levels. I've always heard that people generally enjoytalking about themselves and so ve. I've had this as a I've, never been ina formal sales role, although I've indirectly sold. I think most of us dowho are not formally in sales, but do people enjoy talking about themselves.I mean my impression is that people feel better about you simply for youbeing curious. Listening and continuing to ask questions. Is that somethingthat You'e run into yeah? I think that's exactly true a I'm, not a trainpsychologist, and you know other people coing to speak to that, but, as just ahuman being, that's been on the planet for a number of years and in businessand so forth. Absolutely people love to talk because it's if the other person'slistening actually paying attention, really curious. It's a form ofvalidation, it's a form of respect and again you go back to that. resiprocitything: The handshake, the listening all that stuff of variations on respect andwe crave respect from others- and you know those of us who hal figured it outmore than others know that the way you get rerspective you give respect andlistening curiosity, it's a way F of...

...showing showing respect and the naturalresponse is the recipricate and show it back. So to do that little game right Imean I, I can tell people, imagine you're going on a a blind date withsomebody for the first time. You know when you meet up at the bar and hello.How are you PULPA Blot, and the first thing one person says is so tell meabout yourself, which is an invitation. First of all, it says you talk first,which is a gesture. You know of respect and tell me about yourself and ifyou're, the one who's asked that the right thing to do is, of course, you'veden to tell them about yourself because it would be disrepectful not to, butwhat's critical is how long you go off ecause if you go on for ten minutesabout yourself, you're never going to get another day. Nor should you that'sway too long. The game is played by giving about a minute. You know how ofrespect and then say, but you know enough about me: Let's talk about youand then you show the respect by asking the other question bout. Other personquestions, you show curiosity attention et CEERA and the trust bills. I love itsuch a great tip and fun example that I think really above all, shows that thisis useful in almost any relationship, not just in a selling or servicedynamic, asouly, igt utbut to stay there a little bit talk about you know,so I coauthord a book and we dedicated it in addition to our family membersand our team members here at Bombam to people who value relationships overtransactions and that's something that you write and speak on talk about therelationship between relationships and transactions. Where does that go wrong?Yeah, you know have a feeling, there's a paradox. There too, it's like theless you focus on the transaction, the more likely it is, I'm just guessing,but Godgo O on that yeah it's in general, as as a gross rule inbusiness in life, you should focus more on relationships than on transactions.If you do that, the transactions come...

...fairly. Naturally, you know themetaphor is frit falling off a tree. If you murture the tree, it's going toproduce a lot of fruit. If you focus on stripping off the fruit you're going tokill the tree eventually and the metaphor whole and the places that goeswrong- and this is particularly true in business- is the overmetricisation ofbusiness if he will, because we can, because there's so much data availableout there and the reigning theory is that you know you can't measure youcan't manage it, which is completely false. I mean Youre, a million thinkyou coan, do it to manage without measurements, but we get lost in what te what the data is supposed to. We forget what the DAT is supposed torepresent, that we just focus on the data. So look at ninety percent ofsales models out there. They start with getting a LEAV, they end wit clasing,the sale, that's a transactioal Mol and the implicit assumption is you'resupposed to get the sale. You know and then somehow you go find another oneand do it again, it's a terrible model and it leads sales, people and Postoroservice people and all kinds of other folks to just focus on the transaction.If you're in the receiving end of a just transactional person you're goingto feel they don't care about me, you know in fact they're going to cut thisdiscussion short as soon as they figure out whe ther eamaram not going to buy,there's going to be no flexibility in dealing with them, because they'refocused only on this transaction. So what it really raises is a long termversus short term perspective and here's the paradox you referred to thefact: is you get better shortterm results if you behave constantly in along term way, as opposed to constantly focusing on the short term, trying tomaximize short tuerm benefits and so forth, and it's amazing how muchemphasis there is people think well, I want to be measured on short termresults. Therefore, I have to behave in a short term manner. I got to get thesales to hit my quota. This quarter, you know whatever. When the fact is youdon't get better results that way. People know you're transacting, youactually get better short term. Results might be having long term such awonderful and probably very valuable...

...paradox to be aware of F for people who you know for the forthe sales folks who are listening to this and are in an environment that isvery metrics oriented and produces. This kind of you know miopic view ofthe sales process where you're just looking at the next. You know thirty tosixty days. Igt people can feel that right, I'm sure it affects the way theytrust you as if you are operating from a you know, from a long termperspective from the beginning, it probably softly, and maybe evenunintentionally communicate something to someone that that builds trust. Howcan an individual sales person or better yet a sales leader? I would assume that you've seen severaltimes kind of a change in tone, changing approach within a sales,professional or better, yet a sales team to kind of break some of thosehabits that we naturally want to find ourselves in. Because of some of thesedogmatic ideas, you just tore down a couple of them. Tell me a story or giveme some tips about how someone might break out of that kind of culture orhabit right well. First of all, there's nothing wrong with metrics per SA.What's wrong is how we interpret them. You know and twey think woe jump fromshort term results. Difer, ter behaviors. Mostly it's a matter ofmindset. You honestly, if you start thinking instead of this, is you knowthe third project? We might sell te these people. I want to get this one.You need to start thinking hey. This could goto like fifty projects. This isjust number three. Let me think Ihad to seven and ten. What's really going onhere. What are we missing and maybe we don't need to get the highest price ofthis one. In fact, maybe we can have a discussion whereby, if I give him abreak here, they'll give me a break forther. Maybe I should share moreinformation with them, because itw'll make the fifth and the tenth and theFifteenth Decision Easier. So you begin to be more transparent. You began tothink hey. My goals are interplied with their I'm, not an opposition to them.We need to think about we're being on...

...the same same side of the table. Thereare few mental tricks like ask yourself. Would I ever recommend to competitr tothis client, which seems cerrific, you know but think about it. If you wouldnever recommend a competitor ever youre implicitly saying we are always betteron every test than anybody else, and that's inherently ridiculous nobody'sgoing to believe that, so you have to have an attitude that says every time Isee a new possible lead discussion from a client. I need to ask: Are we theright people for it? It's not us. You know, maybe who else and if it turnsout that you get a lead, that you're really not right for don't kind of fimmediately the miny you find out it's wrong because they're now wasted leadinstead think Ta. These people called us up for some reason. You know it wasnot crazy for us to have this conversation and maybe they're notright, but I may run itto these people three years from now they're going totalk to people. Why don't? I spend an extra five minutes on the phone,helping this person figure out how they can solve their problem. Not using US.Don't remember that Great Markin, great advertising totally inexpensive, I'mjust roiling off a few things here, but it's mostly mindset, attitude and I'phrase. It around four te concepts or principals qlient focus for the sake ofa client not for you collaboration as opposed to complecation transparency inall cases, unless it's illegal or fruitful and findilng that long termperspective that we had talked about before too so good. I want to go at what are any of thoseelements, part of your equation. No, but no those are. Can I mention the equation. Yes, please,the the trust equation. Remember I mentioned at the beginning. Trust is arelationship between somebody who takes a risk and then somebody who is or isnot trustworthy. The trust equation has to do with the second part. The notionof crussworthiness and it's a descriptor for how we come to betrustworthy, how we trust others,...

...someone whos, trustworthy, scorns, theequation to CPLUS R plus I over s and CSTANDS for credibility like do. Ibelieve what this first is telling me to they have credentials. Do they haveconfidence are stands for reliability like to me depend that kind depend onthem or they can show up on time o they have a track record. Are they going todo what they said? They would do those two are kind of rational ones.You can think of doing metrics on those, for example, the others are quitedifferent. Intimacy, CPLSRSI intimacy is an contentionally. You know kind ofshocking word in the business context and we use it that way on purpose. Itinvolves a little bit of risk. It really says: Do I feel safe talking tothis person? What kind of things can I share with them? Are they going to know?You know the right time to laugh on the right time not to or they gon o o go opast this along to and who not to and if they do or they're going to be verycareful, high integrity dealing with my situation. That's high inimacy thedenominator factor that self orientation goes back to the thatneurotic selfobsession that we talked out about before. Are they wrapped upin themselves or they comfortable enough to actually be paying attentionto me? We actually we started off in the boat trust e eviser came out of twothousand. That was just a conceptual model and people loved it and thenabout eight years after it, he dawn domy. That might actually make a goodonline self assessment tool, and we put it up on anybody, can now take itthere's a free version. I woal anybody could take it on our website aboutseventy thouzand people of taken it, and we have enough data that we canactually draw a few conclusions from it. I'll give you two one of them is well.Let me, let me put you on the squire. An let me make you guess here who doyou think shows up is more trustworthy, men or women. Don't really think it towies. You were correct, statistically correct, that's true and, secondly,you're doing right of those four factors which one do you think ended upactually having the most explanatory...

...value when you analyze it through aregression equation: credibility, reliability, intimacy, low selforientation, which would you guess, is the most powerful. Well, my my justlooking at the way you built the equation, I would want to say thedenominator, but I'm going to SAK TM. Okay, I was going to see, see butyou're correct, Anho, Wyour, correct, onbos yeah. The way it's designed it,it seems like Youwould, have the greatest impact on the outcome. That ishow we designed t and that's kind of how we thought of it, and we weren'tthinking of it as being a statistical measure at the time. But later when wedid, it turns out jade, it's actually inimacy as the most powerful one, whichis an interesting finding for most of us in business. You know, particularlyin the sort of increasingly technology driven businesses that tends to be thelowest skill for most people and es, and yet it's the most powerful. So it'sthe biggest source of competitive advantage. If you want to think of itthat way, most of your competitors are probably as bad an as you are and ifyou can get a little better, you got a lot of leverage. So that's the trustequation. Thank you for asking yeah. I love it. I'm going to good I'm goingto go, take the test and what? How can someone go? Take the test? Normally, Iwould ask, is at the end, but because we're right here trusted advisorcom isthe website the et trusted advisor Avisorcom and on the front page. If youlook in the upper right corner, you'll see, there's a link to take the TQ andtake the press quotion, something like that. There's a free version of it, andif you want to pays thirty bucks, I think it is or something you get a muchlonger for the thee. The Free Vird, who give you your store into your highstlovs and a few insights awesome I'll, also add that to the notes when Ipublish his school. Thank you looks wrap up here before I go with my my I'mexcited to hear the answers to this my standard closing questions, but beforewe get there, let's talk. Let's just spend a minute on relationships thatare bad or are going bad or have already gone bad right. So someonewho's listenedto. Listening to this and...

...they're like Gash, you know I have beenoperating from a short term mindset. I haven't been really conscious of someof these trust symbols. I didn't know the elements of how to build trust. Ijust was operating intuitively and sometimes I do it well, and sometimes Ido it foorly. So I've got some bad relationships in the making or thathave already that e that have already turned a little bit. What are some waysto potentially re? How do you know that it's gone bad, where', some potentialrecovery and when you just need to to cut it loose yeah? Well, I would argue,we all know when it's goine bad, it's that feeling in the Tomiat to desirenot to return the phone call, it's the Groan you have internally. When you seeemail from them, I'm just Gargu, we all kind of know it. We suspect it and thekey rule. Well, first of all, if you can recover a bad business relationship,something goes wrong. It's potentially stronger than just a rating that wasgood to begin with. A lot of customer sat research shows that the key trickto doing it is is he thing we call name at inclaimant. If you name it, you canclaim it calling out the elephant in the room. Speaking about I, it takescourage to do that, but that's the key. You have to find words unique to theperson in the situation to say: Listen, I gotto tell you. This has been goingsouth, we haven't talked about it, but you know it's true. I know it's true.This happened that happened. I think we need to talk about this, and herethere's one key in doing that. You have to slightly overcomfeencate for sayingwhat it was 't happen. You cannot underdo it. This is the watercateproblem. You know the coverups worse than the cry, if you, if you sort oflead up to it, but you leave a little hand o wron you it's kind of your faultto or was 't really that bad. No, you just fill the whole deal. You have togo over the top and saying listen. This happened, and that happened. It washorrible in the end of the world y now and you want the other person to say.Okay, okay, I get it. Yes, things are bad all right. Let's talk about I'm Goin to assume that we probablyshouldn't assign or take blame in these...

...scenarios. Do we do we just talk aboutall the bad things that happen and we all kind of know what happened or do weget or do y? Is it better to take responsibility explicitly or take blameexplicitly you'r like talk a little bit about that that, because I think themost natural thing for us to do is probably be a little bit defensive andor they might hear listeners might hear what you just offerd and say: okay, Ineed to eat it all. I need to eat all the blame, even blame. I don't deservelike talk about the role of blame here, really quickly, yeah, it's a greatquestion and think about the opposite, the opposite tendency to overblame asto overapologize. Both of them go wrong because it's not clear about theresponsibility. When you first have this discussion, you have to make itabsolutely neutral. This happened that happened. You felt bad. I felt bad.This blew up stay miles away from accepting wor, putting blameresponsibility. CCOUNTABILITY, including apologies, don't apologizejust as a way of getting out of something difficult to wait untilyou're able to say what? Let's sanalize what happened here? How could we havemade it so that didn't happen? You want to lower the conversation to wher. Youcan have a conversation about actions and behaviors, and then you can beginto say well, that's something we can do on our end. You know is this somethingyou can do on your at and at that point you're talking about behaviors and atsome point, if it is your fault, if you did blow it, you do need to make itapolity, but it comes at the end and not at the beginning. You know once youfigured out what responsibilities were it's excellent. It shows someone thatyou really have been thoughtful about it and you're worrying on a pathforward, which is more important than just the apology itself so relationships. As I said before,it's in the dedication of our book. I would assume that there's somestatement, similar R around trust, O relationship in some of your books aswell. It's our number one core value here at bombom relationships are, andso I like to give you the chance to...

...thank her mention someone. Who's had areally positive impact on your life or career, and to mention a company thatyou really respect for the way that they're treating their customers andfuture customers yeah. It's a great. I actually have troublewith the first question, I you know: Therre Raybe, half a dozen people, butsomegoing O co a little different way. I'M gonna CO'm Gong. To mention oneperson he's long gone. He did a seminal thing for me. He Wol op, a story that Itell on the block my first big sales tall. He was my boss and he was with meand after the coffee and pleasant Raes feet. The client look me in the ienceof what experience do you have doing: worgeting studies for industrialconsumables or the same paper company, and the answer was honestly: We didn'thave any and I'm rapidly thinking. Oh my God. What do I do? How do I craftthis NBA type answer he stepped in and he took the question and his answer tothat was simplike, none thatg. I can think of what else would you like totalk about, and it distilled perfectly everything that I try to talk about intrust. Lower the confrontation spoke, the truth focused on the relationship,not the transaction. We can unpact that little comment for you know half a day,but that was a great favore that he did ma in terms of companies. I don't knowany big companies that I think are terribly better or worse than well,there's some bad ones. I think you know well Farco these days. deservadly getsa lot of criticism, but the really good companies I find really good behavior.I found it in some small companies and I found it in groups within largecompanies. There's no reason they can't be done at scale and just has it, butall single out, one in particular. BANGOER savings back up in Bangor man,it's a it's a Ou know. One of the bigger banks in Maine Whith still makesit a small bank. They get everything I talk about beautifully. They do afantastic job. There is a team within Microsoft, of about a hundred an fiftypeople who totally get this stuff thee. There are some thithat excentere hasdone in pieces of their organization...

...that I'll mention Ey two Runstin, youup pockets pieces of the organization where people have understood thesethings and make transformand if hugely productive things happen because tytheyfocused on trust. We can have another conversation about why it's perfectlyscalable about why they haven't scaled itto, larger levels. But you knowthat's another day: Another riter rea a great. This has been awesome. I'veenjoyed it so much. I hope, Blisserethiou as much value as I haveyou've already shared, where people can take that test at trusted. ADVISORCOM.How else can someone connect with you, twitter, at Charles Age, green email, c,green at Truste, Advisorcom that CG R, Eken and blinked in, like you know,Charles Eighth Green? I forget what the Exact Tho we point: Thou there suresuper we are connected there. We got connected there through a mutualconnection. That's how we set this up. So I also welcome anyone. WHO'slistening to connect with me, ethon Bute, be ute Ethan Beute at Linkin aswell, we're both there for you, Charlie and me Charlie. Thank you so much foryour time. Thank you. Weon real pleasure, yeah pleasure for me to, andI hope you have a really productive week- take care thin. You are listeningto the customer experience podcast, no matter your role in delivering valueand serving customers. You're intrusting, some of your most importantand valuable messages to faceless digital communication. You can dobetter rehumonize. The experience by getting face to face through simplepersonal videos, learn more and get started. Free at Bombomcom. You've beenlistening to the customer experience podcast to ensure that you never missan episode subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player or visitvom bomcom. Thank you so much for listening until next time.

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