The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

16. Quick Ways to Create Trust with Your Customers w/ Charles Green

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Trust matters when it comes to customer experience.

People line up at the Apple Store’s Genius Bar in part because they’ve come to trust that they will get a great customer experience.

Whether you’re a B2B or B2C, how can you create trust with your customers?

To find the answers, I spoke with Charles H. Green, CEO of Trusted Advisor Associates. He's the author of Trust-Based Selling: Using Customer Focus and Collaboration to Build Long-Term Relationships and The Trusted Advisor Fieldbook: A Comprehensive Toolkit for Leading with Trust.

For Charles, you create trust by focusing on building a long-term relationship instead of focusing on the current transaction.

Charles suggests that you engage in active listening to make your prospects and customers feel like you understand how they’re feeling.

Of a gross rule in business inlife, you should focus more relationships than on transactions. If you do that, the transactions come fairly naturally. You're listening to the customer experience podcast,a podcast dedicated to helping today's growing businesses restore a personal human touch throughout thecustomer life cycle. Get ready to hear how sales, marketing and customer successexperts surprise and delight and never lose sign of their customers humanity. Here's yourhost, Ethan Butte. All right, we are going deep on this episodeof the customer experience podcast into trust, because we have one of the foremostexperts on trust, Charles Green, CEO of trusted advisor associates. He's beenrunning that company for more than two dozen years. He's the author of thetrusted advisor, the trusted advisor Field Book, Trust, base selling. Charlie,welcome to the customer experience podcast. Thank you even pleasure to be here. We are obviously going to go deep on trust. It seems like it'syour life's work and Gosh, if you're going to dedicate yourself to something,I can't think of too many other better themes. But I always like tostart with everyone because I think the definitions vary depending on what seat ear inand what experience you've had. When I say customer experience, what comes tomind? What do you think about? What are some of its characteristics?See, what comes to my mind, and I'm biased, of course,because of that perspective on trust, that it's I immediately think full bandwidth connection. Do I understand this person as a human being or is this he hadanother transactional interaction with a nameless, faceless person? So to me it's annobrainer for most relationships in business. I focus mostly on B to be butit's also tribute to see you want to have some kind of human connection.If you're able to do that, business and life just gets a whole lotbetter. So for you, then, if you're going to deliver a goodcustomer experience, there needs to be a...

...trust based component, that is thatis truly human to human. Yeah, I mean they're well, there aresome things, let's face it, where you know, we don't mind nothaving a toller, we'd got to go to an adm. we don't mindinterfacing with Amazon on the web because we don't want personal interactions. But shortof a lot of things that don't require much. Yeah, we do needpeople and we don't spend money, we don't make big decisions without some kindof connection. So it is critical. It's funny, I just had aconversation with a couple people that conjured my own experience with Amazon, just becauseyou mentioned it, where we were just working so hard to get a phonenumbers. We had a question that wasn't easily resolved through the interface. Youhave to really work for it, but you can still pick up a opponent, speak to it and correct maybe Agario very deeply, but it is there. Yeah, and it's and it's a great helpful human on the other side. So even for those systems that are ninety nine percent automated in machine driven, personalized, albeit but still machine driven, that personal touches critical. So ifyou're one thing, they're just to touch on it. You mentioned thatthe person that the other end, when you finally got them, was reallycompetent. So many companies underinvesting competent, super helpful, great people on theother end of the phone. I can't think of a better place to overinvestthan that person. Great Call. That's the entire premise of the service profitchain is if you put all of your investment up front in internal service qualityand people, hiring, recruiting, onboarding, training, equipping them and continue tobuild into them. Everything else falls out from there. Yeah, soyour theme is obviously trust. Just be specific. Why is trust so fundamentalto the customer experience? Well, if trust is a human response to riskreally, and you know, almost any action in life is there is arisk component to it. You step out the door, across the street,you need somebody new, and we're not. We like to think that we're rational, calculating brainiacts all the time, but the truth is, where youknow a protein based life forms who have...

...been evolved through eons to deal withthe unknown, and one of the greatest ways is really trust. We veryquickly suss out can I trust this person with respect to this, with respectto that? And it's as true in today's sophisticated BEDB businesses as it is, you know, a hundred years ago on the frontier. We still don'tlike to make decisions that are critical, that are involved money, Ego,careers and all that stuff without having some sense of trust. If it's there, it helps a lot. If it's absent, you're dealing with price andfeatures, and it's not a very great way to hang your relationships on.That's excellent. There's almost a you're almost making them one in the same,like human relationship and human connection, that that trust is inseparable from the healthyone. Well, that's really true in you know the way trust works.It's kind of reciprocity. Think about a handshake. You reach out a handshaketo someone, automatically, ninety nine, point nine of them are going toreturn your handshake. That gesture of reciprocity gets replicated across all kinds of littleinteractions that have to do with etiquette and in custom and it works that wayin business, in trust too. If I take a risk and trust you, guess what you're going to do. If I treat you well, guesswhat you're going to do. If I treat you badly, guess what you'regoing to do. And so trust is a series of ways in which wecraft this very fundamental person interaction with each other. You do it right,you play the game right together, you end up trusting each other and infinitenumber of things go better. You do it wrong, you end up withload trust and, you know the same infinite number of stuff goes down.Awesome. I just a preview. Two people listening, we are going toget to relationships that have gone bad, because there's some chances to save itand there are other times you just need to cut the line. But let'sgo here. You know, for someone who's maybe hasn't been intentional or consciousabout trust, in my Gosh, you...

...know, should I, you know, raise this up as an important thing for myself or my team or whatever? Just talk about some of the obvious and maybe not so obvious economic orsocial or ethical benefits of focusing on trust and building it into some of yourprocesses with intention? Yeah, so let's see, I mean run off.Let's do it in kind of a sales environment, just to pick one metaphorit. It happens across customer service, but other things to it, butlet's let's just pick sales. If your potential customer trust to you a lotdeeply, think of all the things that happen. Hey, they more likelyto buy from you, be they're less likely to push back on price.See the more likely to be opened and share with you all the issues thatare really going on the they're more likely to give you referrals and references whateverletter were up to. They're less likely to challenge your statements. They're morelikely to cut you some slack if you make a mistake, they're more likelyto forgive you, and it goes on on on. Stephen M Marcuby Jr, a sort of competitor of mine and author of the speed of trust andexcellent boy. As a very simple statement, he says when trust is present,things go faster and cost less, when trust is absolute, things goslower and cost more. That covers a waterfront an issues. I think he'sdone a brilliant job of summarizing it. So you know there's just a touch, a few of the things that happen better when there's a trust based relationship. I loved your list there and I'm sure you could have gone on andon and on more elements, because it's just so again, fundamentally human asa need, but you really summarize it nicely there. How does someone leadwith trust? How do you raise it up? What are some of theactivities or actions someone can take in order to build trust quicker and to communicateagain, as you said, like the way I might my posture with you, in the way I treat you is going to affect the way you lookback and treat me, etc. What are some things people can do toto show those signs that build trust and that demonstrate that I trust you?Right, we should mention the thing called...

...the trust equations at some point,which touches on several things, but I'd say one thing stands out above all. There is a long rest of things. One stands out and that's very simple. It's to do a really great job of listening to the other person, and it's a particular kind of listening. I mean hardly the first persons.As a listening is important, but I'm not talking about listening that getsto twenty questions to find out the answer. I'm not talking about listening to testthe hypothesis. I'm not talking about active listening, mirror and listening.It's a particular kind of listening and it is to make the other person feelheard, to make sure that the other person feels yes, you get youwere paying attention to me, you understand what I was saying and to goback to that reciprocal feature that's built into us as humans. When somebody feelsthat way, what do they do? They returned the gesture, they emotionallysay well, good, now tell me about you, and they become muchmore willing to listen. So there's a paradox at the heart of this stuff. If you want to be good at selling, if you want people totake your advice, if you want people to take you seriously, the bestthing to do is shut up and listen to that. So ironically, youknow, talking more is the wrong thing. Listening more induces them to listen whenit's your turn. So that's just so far above everything else. Thereare a whole ton of other things, but that really deserves singling out.Something you right and speak about is curiosity. Talk a little bit about the roleof curiosity here. Yeah, we have a little top ten list puttogether years ago of things to do and that's number one. You know,cultivate an attitude of curiosity. For one thing, one of the one ofthe big trust killers is what we call high self orientation, which comes intwo flavors. Either it's selfishness. You know, we don't trust people whoare selfish. That's really obvious. We don't run into a lot of selfishpeople in business, so that's not a common problem. The one that iscommon is that people who were rest up...

...in their own heads they're neurotically selfobsessed. When they're pretending to talk to a customer, they're really thinking,oh my gosh, am I going to get to sale? That they likeme, that they not like me? Are they listening to me or theynot listening to me? You know, I welcome everybody's watching me. Howfrom nobody's watching all that stuff. It's you wrapped up in your own headand the other person can feel that. We know when somebody's actually paying attentionand listing to us and we know when they're not. And curiosity. Trainingyourself to have an attitude of curiosity. One of the wonderful side effects isyou can't be self obsessed if you're focused on the other person, if you'recurious about the other person. So it works on an emotional level. Itworks on a very rational level. If you're curious, you're going to comeup with a bunch of questions, and questions are great. You know,you ask your customers clients and good questions, they're flattered, you learn something,you build the connection and it just works on a whole bunch of levels. I've I've always heard that people generally enjoy talking about themselves, and soI've I've had this as a I've never been in a formal sales role,although I've indirectly sold. I think most of us do who are not formallyin sales. But do people enjoy talking about themselves? I mean my impressionis that people feel better about you simply for you being curious, listening andcontinuing to ask questions. Is that something that you've run into? Yah,I think that's exactly true. I'm not a trained psychologist and you know otherpeople can speak to that, but as just a human being that's been onthe planet for a number of years and in business and so forth. Absolutely, people love to talk because it's if the other person's listening, actually payingattention, really curious. It's a form of validation, it's a form ofrespect. And again you go back to that reciprocity saying on the handshake,the listening, all that stuff or variations on respect, and we crave respectfrom others and you know, those of us who have figured it out morethan others know that the way you get respect as you give respect and listening, curiosity. It's a way of showing...

...showing respect, and then natural responseis the reciprocate and show it back. So to do that little game right, I mean I can tell people. Imagine you're going on a blind datewith somebody for the first time, you know, and you meet up atthe bar and hello, how are you, Blaba Blah, and the first thingone person says is so tell me about yourself, which is an invitation. First of all, it says you talk first, which is a gesture, you know, of respect, and tell me about yourself. And ifyou're the one who's asked that, the right thing to do is of courseyou've done tell them about yourself, because it would be disrespectful not to.But what's critical is how long you go on, because if you go onfor ten minutes about yourself, you're never get to get another date, norshould you. That's way too long. The game is played by giving abouta minute, you know, out of respect, and then say, butyou know enough about me, let's talk about you. And then you showthe respect by asking the other question, other person questions, you show curiosity, attention, etc. And the trust bills. I love it. Sucha great tip in a fun example that I think really above fall shows thatthis is useful in almost any relationship, not just in a selling or servicedynamic. We right, but to stay there a little bit, talk aboutyou know. So I coauthored a book and we dedicated it, in additionto our family members and our team members here at bombomb, to people whovalue relationships over transactions. And that's something that you write and speak on.Talk about the relationship between relationships and transactions. Where does that go wrong? Yeah, and I have a feeling there's a paradox there too, is likethe less you focus on the transaction, the more likely it is. I'mjust guessing, but on that yeah, it's in general, as a grossrule in business, in life, you should focus more relationships than on transactions. If you do that, the transactions come fairly naturally. You know themetaphors fruit falling off a tree. If...

...you nurture the tree, it's goingto produce a lot of fruit. If you focus on stripping off the fruit, you're going to kill the three eventually. And and the metaphor holes and theplaces it goes wrong, and this is particularly true in business, isthe over metricization of business, if you will, because we can, becausethere's so much data available out there and the reigning theory is that you knowyou can't measure, you can't manage it, which is completely false. I meanyour million think you could do to manage without measurements. But we getlost in what the what the data is supposed to we forget what the Dis supposed to represent and we just focus on the data. So look atninety percent of sales models out there. They start with getting a lead,they ab with closing the sale. That's a transactional model and the implicit assumptionis you're supposed to get the sale you know and then somehow you go findanother one and do it again. It's a terrible model and it leads salespeople and customer service people and all kinds of other folks to just focus onthe transaction. If you're in the receiving end of a just transactional person,you're going to feel they don't care about me. You know in fact they'regoing to cut this discussion short as soon as they figure out whether I amor am not going to buy. There's going to be no flexibility in dealingwith them because they are focused only on this transaction. So what it reallyraises is the long term versus short term perspective. And here's the paradox youreferred to. The fact is, you get better short term results if youbehave constantly in a long term way, as opposed to constantly focusing on theshort term, trying to maximize short term benefits and so forth. And it'samazing how much emphasis there is. People think, well, I want tobe measured on short term results, therefore I have to behave in a shortterm manner. I got to get the sales to hit my quota of thisquarter. You know, whatever, the fact is, you don't get betterresults that way. People know you're transacting. You actually get better short term resultsby behaving long term. Such a wonderful and probably very valuable paradox tobe aware of for for people who,...

...you know, for the for thesales folks who are listening to this and are in an environment that is verymetrics oriented and and produces this kind of, you know, my opic view ofthe sales process where you're just looking at the next, you know,thirty to sixty days. Right, people can feel that, right. I'msure it affects the way they trust you or as if you are operating froma you know, from a long term perspective. From the beginning, itprobably softly and maybe even unintentionally communicates something to someone that that builds trust.How can an individual salesperson or, better yet, a sales leader, Iwould assume that you've seen several times, kind of a change in tone,change in approach within a sales professional or, better yet, a sales team,to kind of break some of those habits that we naturally want to findourselves in because of some of these dogmatic ideas. You just tore down acouple of them. Tell me a story or give me some tips about howsomeone might break out of that kind of culture or habit right. Well,first of all, there's nothing wrong with metrics per se. What's wrong ishow we interpret them, you know, and we think. We jump fromshort term results to short term behaviors. Mostly it's a matter of mindset.You honestly, if you start thinking instead of this is, you know,the third project we might Sol these people, I want to get this one,you need to start thinking, Hey, this could go to like fifty projects, this is just number three. Let me think. I had two, seven and ten. What's really going on here? What are we missing? And maybe we don't need to get the highest price on this one.In fact, maybe we can have a discussion whereby if I give him abreak here, they'll give me a break further maybe I should share more informationwith them, because it'll make the fifth and the ten and the fifteen decisioneasier. So you begin to be more transparent. He began to think,Hey, my goals are intertwined with theirs. I'm not an opposition to them.We need to think about we're being...

...on the same side of the table. There are a few mental tricks like ask yourself what I ever recommend acompetitor to this client, which seems horrific, you know, but think about it. If you would never recommend a competitor, ever, you're implicitly sayingwe are always better on every task than anybody else, and that's inherently ridiculous. Nobody's going to believe that. So you have to have an attitude thatsays hmm. Every time I see a new possible lead discussion from a client, I need to ask are we the right people for it? If notus, you know, maybe who else? And if it turns out that youget a lead, that you're really not right for. Don't cut itoff immediately the many you find out it's wrong, because they're now a wastedlead. Instead thinking these people called us up for some reason. You know, it was not crazy for us to have this conversation. And maybe they'renot right, but I may run into these people three years from now.They're going to talk to people. Why don't I spend the extra five minuteson the phone helping this person figure out how they can to solve their problem, not using us? Don't remember. That's great marking, great advertising,totally inexpensive. I'm just rattling off a few things here, but it's mostlymindset, attitude, and I'd freeze it around for key concepts or principles.Client focus for the sake of a client, not for you. Collaboration as opposedto competition, transparency in all cases, unless it's illegal or hurtful. Andfinally, that long term perspective that we had talked about before. Tooso good. I want to go at what are any of those elements partof your equation? No, but no, those are can I mention the equation? Yes, please, they the trust equation. Remember, I mentionedat the beginning trust as a relationship between somebody who takes a risk and thensomebody who is or is not trustworthy. The trust equation has to do withthe second part, the notion of trustworthiness, and it's a descriptor for how wecome to be trustworthy, how we...

...trust others. As someone who's trustworthyscores the the equation to C plus, R plus I overs and see standsfor credibility like, do I believe what this person is telling me, thatthey have credentials, that they have confidence? Are stands for reliability like to theydepend? That kind of depend on them, or they going to showup on times and they have a track record, or they're going to dowhat they said they would do. Those two were kind of rational ones.You can think of doing metrics on those, for example. The other two quitedifferent. Intimacy, see plus, R Plusi. Intimacy is and contentionally, you know, kind of shocking word in the business context and we useit that way on purpose. It involves a little bit of risk. Itreally says, do I feel safe talking to this person? What kind ofthings can I share with them? Are they going to know, you know, the right time to laugh on the right time not to. Are theygoing to know who have passed this along too and who not to? Andif they do, they're going to be very careful, high integrity, dealingwith my situation. That's high enimacy. The denominator factor, that self orientation, goes back to the that neurotic self obsession that we talked out about before. Are they wrapped up in themselves or are they comfortable enough to actually bepaying attention to me? We actually we started off in the book trusted advisor, came out in two thousand. That was just a conceptual model and peopleloved it. And then, about eight years after it dawn them mean thatmight actually make a good online self assessment tool, and we put it upand anybody can now take it. There's a free version of WOT. Anybodycould take it on our website. About Seventyzero people have taken it and wehave enough data that we can actually draw a few conclusions from it. I'llgive you too. One of them is, well, let me let me putyou on this, byter Ethan. Let me make you guess here.Who Do you think shows up as more trustworthy? Men Or women? Don'treally think it to us you were correct statistically correct. That's true. Andsecondly, you're doing right. Of those four factors, which one do youthink ended up actually having the most explanatory...

...value when you analyze it through aregression equation? Credibility, reliability, intimacy, low self orientation, which would youguess is the most powerful? Well, might might, just looking at theway you built the equation, I would want to say the denominator,but I'm going to see, Tim okay, I was going to see you seeby your correct know we you're correct on both. Yeah, the wayit's designed, it seems like you would have the greatest impact on the outcome. That is how we designed it and that's kind of how we thought ofit and we weren't thinking of it as being a statistical measure at the time, but later, when we did, it turns out G it's actually intimacyis the most powerful one, which is an interesting finding for most of usin business, you know, particularly in the sort of increasingly technology driven businesses, that tends to be the lowest skill for most people in business and yetit's the most powerful. So it's the biggest source of competitive advantage, ifyou want to think of it that way. Most of your competitors are probably asbad added as you are, and if you can get a little better, you got a lot of leverage. So that's the trust equation. Thankyou for asking. Yeah, and I love it. I'm going to go. I'm going to go take the test. And what how could someone go takethe test? Normally I would ask is at the end, but becausewe're right here, trusted ADVISORCOM is the website a be trusted advisor, atvisoarcom, and the front page, if you look in the upper right corner, you'll see there's a link to take the Tq, take the cross quote, something like that. There's a free version of it and if you wantto pass thirty bucks, I think it is or something, you've get amuch longer version. The three the free Versi who give you your score,if your highs, lows and a few insights. Awesome. I'll also addthat to the notes when I publish this whole thank you. Let's wrap uphere before I go with my my I'm excited to hear the answers to thismy standard closing questions, but before we get there, let's talk. Let'sjust spend a minute on relationships. That are bad or are going bad orhave already gone bad. Right. So...

...someone who's listening listening to this andthey're like, Gosh, you know, I have been operating from a shortterm mindset. I haven't been really conscious of some of these trust symbols.I didn't know the elements of how to build trust. I just was operatingintuitively and sometimes I do it well and sometimes I do it poorly. SoI've got some bad relationships in the making or that have already that are thathave already turned a little bit. We're some ways to potentially recut. Howdo you know that it's gone bad? Where some potential recovery and when youjust need to cut it loose? Yeah, well, I would argue we allknow when it's gone bad. It's that feeling in the tummy. It'sto desire not to return the phone call, it's the growing you have internally whenyou see an email from them. I'm just gonna argue we all kindof know it, we suspect it and the key rule will first of all, if you can recover a bad business relationship with sudden goes wrong, it'spotentially stronger than just a waiting that was good to begin with, a lotof customer set. Research shows that the key trick to doing it is isthe thing we call name it and claimant. If you name it, you canclaim it, calling out the elephant in the room speaking about it.Takes Courage to do that, but that's the key. You have to findwords unique to the person in the situation to say, listen, I gotto tell you this has been going south. We haven't talked about it, butyou know it's true. I know it's true. This happened, thathappened. I think we need to talk about this. And here's there's onekey in doing that. You have to slightly overcompency for saying what it was, it happened. You cannot underdo it. This is the Watergate problem. Youknow, the coverups worse than the crime. If you if you sortof lead up to it, but you leave a little hand of while on. Yeah, it's kind of your fault to or wasn't really that bad.No, you just killed the whole deal. You have to go over the topand saying, listen, this happened and that happened. It was horriblein the end of the world. You know, and you want the otherperson to say, okay, okay, I get it. Yes, thingsare bad. All right, let's talk about I am going to assume thatwe probably shouldn't assign or take blame in...

...these scenarios. Do we do wejust talk about all the bad things that happened and we all kind of knowwhat happened, or do we get or do you? Is it better totake responsibility explicitly or take blame explicitly? You're like talk a little bit aboutthat that, because I think the most natural thing for us to do isprobably be a little bit defensive and or they might hear listeners might hear whatyou just offered and say, okay, I need to eat it all.I need to eat all the blame, even blame I don't deserve. Liketalk about the role of blame here really quickly. Yeah, it's a greatquestion, and think about the opposite. The opposite tendency of to over blameis to overapologize. Both of them go wrong because it's not clear about theresponsibility. When you first have this discussion, you have to make it absolutely neutral. This happened, that happened. You felt bad, I felt bad. This blew up. Staying miles away from accepting or putting blame, responsibility, accountability, including apologies. Don't apologize just as a way of getting outof something difficult. Wait until you're able to say what what's analyze what happenedhere, how could we have made it so that didn't happen? You wantto lower the conversation to where you can have a conversation about actions and behaviorsand then you can begin to say, well, that's something we can doon our end. You know, is this something you can do on yourad and at that point you're talking about behaviors and at some point, ifit is your fault, if you did blow it, you do need tomake an apology, but it comes at the end and not at the beginning. You know, once you figure out what responsibilities were, its excellent.It shows someone that you really have been thoughtful about it and you're working ona path forward, which is more important than just the apology itself. Andon. So relationships. As I said before, it's in the dedication ofour book. I would assume that there's some statement similar around trust or relationshipin some of your books as well. It's our number one core value hereat bombomb. Relationships are, and so I like to give you the chanceto thank or mention someone who's had a...

...really positive impact on your life orcareer and to to mention a company that you really respect for the way thatthey're treating their customers and future customers. Yeah, it's a great I actuallyhave trouble with the first question. I you know, they're really half adozen people, but some going to call a little different way. I'm goingto coming to mention one person. He's long gone. He did a seminalthing for me. He Roll Moll the story that I tell on the bookmy first big sales call. He was my boss and he was with meand after the coffee and pleasant raise, the client look me in the eyeand said what experience do you have doing marketing studies for industrial consumables of thesame paper company, and the answer was, honestly, we didn't have any.And I'm rapidly thinking, Oh my God, what do I do,how do I craft this NBA type answer? He stepped in and he took thequestion and his answer to that was just like none that I can thinkof. What else would you like to talk about and distill the perfectly everythingthat I try to talk about in trust, lowered the confrontation, spoke the truth, focused on the relationship, not the transaction. We can unpack thatlittle comment for, you know, half a day, but that was agreat favor that he did me. In terms of companies, I don't knowany big companies that I think are terribly better or worse than a well,there's some bad ones, I think you know Wells Fargo these days deservedly getsa lot of criticism. But the really good companies I find really good behavior. I found it in some small companies and I found it in groups withinlarge companies. There's no reason they can't be done at scale and just hasn't. But I'll single out one in particular, Bang or savings bank up and bangor made. It's a it's a one of the bigger banks in Mamebut still makes it a small bank. They get everything I talked about beautifully. They do a fantastic job there as a team within Microsoft of about ahundred and fifty people who totally get this stuff. There are there are somethings that accenture has done in pieces of...

...their organization that I'll mention Ey toor instant young pockets, pieces of the organization where people have understood these thingsand make transformative, hugely productive things happen because they've they focused on trust.We can have another conversation about why it's perfectly scalable, about why they haven'tscaled in too larger levels. But you know, that's another day, anotherinterview. Great, this has been awesome. I've enjoyed it so much. Ihope Lissom as much value as I have. You've already shared where peoplecan take that test, at trusted ADVISORCOM. How else can someone connect with you? Twitter at Charles Age Green. Mail see green at trusted ADVISERCOM.That's CGREEM and Linkedin. I you know Charles Eh Green. I forget whatthe exact knowing quite you're there. Sure, super. We are connected there.We got connected there through a mutual connection. That's how we set thisup. So I also welcome anyone who's listening to connect with me, Ethan, but be ute Etcha, and Beute at Linkedin as well. We're boththere for you, Charlie and me. Charlie, thank you so much foryour time. Thank you. We in real pleasure. Yeah, pleasure forme too, and I hope you have a really productive week. Take care. Thanks. You're listening to the customer experience podcast. No matter your rolein delivering value and serving customers, you're in trusting some of your most importantand valuable messages to faceless digital communication. You can do better. rehumanize theexperience by getting face to face through simple personal videos. Learn more and getstarted free at bomb bombcom. You've been listening to the customer experience podcast.To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favoritepodcast player or visit bombombcom. Thank you so much for listening. Untilnext time,.

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