The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

20. Why Obsession Is the Missing Ingredient in Your Customer Experience w/ Matt Knee

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

“Obsession is the complete micromanagement of the customer experience.”

According to Matt Knee, Founder and President of MyCompanyWorks and author of the book Startups Made Simple, obsession is a superpower.

Steve Jobs, Herb Kelleher, and Jeff Bezos each have/had it. There aren’t a lot of great companies whose founder wasn’t obsessed with seeing their vision of the perfect customer experience come to life.

Listen in to hear Matt share why obsession is so important and to hear about another superpower he thinks is even more important.

If you have something to get done, itwill get done. You will impose your will on reality. You're listening to the customerexperience podcast a podcast dedicated to helping today's growing businessesrestore a personal human touch throughout the customer line cycle, getready to hear Hou sales, marketing and customer success, experts, surprise anddelight, and never loose sign of their customers. Humanity here is your hosteeten Baute, all right. If you are looking forbetter ways to start grow or systemize your business, including the customerexperience, you are in the right place. Our guests today make starting andrunning a business simple, fast and inexpensive for entrepreneurs andadvisors. His company landed on the ink five husand. They have helped more thanfifty thousand entrepreneurs start and manage their businesses over the pastseventeen years and, of course, is someone who knows start ups, anentrepredeurship so deeply, and so well he's also the author of startups madesimple matiny. Welcome to the customer experience podcast thanks, Youthin gladto be with you awesome, so we're going to start where I always started. Thatis the definition of customer experience. When I say customerexperience, what does that mean to you? What do you think about? Well, when Ihear it, it's a very emotional thing to me. You know it started a long time agowhen I just had these really fantastic experiences with with other companies,and I started for realizing that chees. This is emotional thing that I'm havinghere, I'm actually connecting with these kind feel like this company knowsme or they care about me. Maybe they don't they. Don't even do that in really. He could be a scale kind ofautomated thing, but even it's a just a Feelin at that I get when I interactwith certain copodies and he can see it it teds to brand like ap e people arefanatics about it. You make an emotional connection with someone andthey will wait inline for days to get...

...your product and they will love you andSeng Your prases forever suff. For me, it's always been kind of just anemotional connecton. I love it. I've asked that question to more than twodozen awesome people and I've not heard it express so closely tied to theemotion and the feeling before for you personally, what was an Aha moment. Youknow you just mentioned apple there before we started recording. You talkedabout Southwest Airlines. What was the moment where you knew that southwest,for example, made you feel different. It started very long ago when I firststarted taking southwes tairlines and you just got so entertained by theirstewartess or Stewart attendante or whatever, and they were actuallyhilariously funny, and that was such a different experience from playing O,not talking back in early twosand like even before there only twosand, wet,Flik Itas, just awful, and it was just so sterup and southwest really reallymade a difference in that industry. It's gone as as recent as, of course you mentioned apple. You knowI am a fanatic for their products. I see them. I almost have to have them.It's like. They know me when they come out, so just the those are kind of verystandard answers, but I have noticed in my own company. If things don't feelright, how we're building stuff, whether it ir sa it's a very it- couldbe very tatical stuff like emails, how do they look O os? The website? Look asa field of the colors match to the it doesn't emotionally come together asone a whole, I guess is, is where my concept comes from, and it's what I tryto occess on as a founder. I like that, and I like that you said the wordobsession and what you're talking about there. None of US consciously says toourselves unless you're a designer man, this website really comes togethernicely and makes me feel. Like I'm Goinna, you know a smart cleans, safe,productive place, but it's that feeling that we get so the cool thing aboutwhat you did in your book startups made simple is that you broke it down intosuperpowers is what you call Im. You...

...have them in four categories: EnergyVision, execution and leadership. I'd like to spend a few minutes on, becauseI think it's the one most closely tied to customer experience. I'd like tospend a few minutes on the superpower number seven product obsession. Whatdoes obsession mean to you in this context and who should have thisobsession very simple? It's complete micromanagemess of the customerexperience from the beginning, but- and it has it almost always has to be thefounder. It's Greatat, there's a you know another senior exaocative thatthat is passionate about it, but there's not a lot of comit graycompanies that don't have a'e a founder that wasn't the driving force. If we goto even all the ones Wer we're all going to talk about over and over SteveJobs, a APP the driving force, Hert Keller at southwest the driving for onthat Jeff Bays Up Amazon. The driving for these people are micro managers.When it comes to the experience they go down, I mean we're talking. Jeff Beysosknows that product page on Amazon, like the back of his hand, it's not like hedelegates that out e Notwas, like sat, I mean for better or worse youheres, alot of chricisms on the Amazon Product Tages. You know B T it's what hisvision is an ideal customer experience and then Idon't even need to go onto the store foras. I rit a dewing, my book aboutsteep jobs and he's obsession. I mean this guy. This guy would not purchase avehicle or WEFORDIS A new vehicle every few months, just so he didn't have tohave the California licens played on it because it broke the aesthetics that hewanted to have on a day to day life. I mean just a amazing step like that andthat's what I'm sike saying about obsession like if there's a misspellingon my webt site, I the email design, it does not vibe with the actual websitedesign. If we've done a logo change and the logos aren't matching up orsomething that drives me Bom pers so in, I think it has to be the founder thatsays: Hey. You know this is incredibly...

...important to me. Maybe I'M A littleobsessive! Please understand this is so important to drive this experience andI think I has to be a foudergain. So that is a great answer and y. u youwent to these high level leaders the cool thing about that is that typically, I would think that an earlystartup founder would be obsessed for a while and then maybe kind of turn, someof that off, but you' ve. You know you're talking about multibilliondollar companies and still having that leader. That's deeply obsessed and hatactually goes into. One of your primary tips in that section is having writtenstandards, talk about the importance of documenting or organizing, becausebecause whet you're talking about here with this micromanagement and thisobsession is very very high and very specific standards dictated from thetop and I use dictate specifically- and so you know to make it work and to makeit work across large teams in large organizations. I'm assuming that'sthat's where you go to written standards, talk about the importance oforganizing the standard, specifically in documenting and sharing them. Well, you know it's right in the titleof my book about system, so it is, is you can systemize these things, thesethings that are supposedly creative and ietuative? You can make system for thisand there's a lot of companies that have a very, very good system atbuilding great experiences for customers, so whether it's a Rodmap,whether it's dog fooding, you know what we call the dog futting using your ownproduct and you wouldn't believe how many people don't use the my founders,don't even know they're on poduct HAV'N GOIN to use it, and once they dothey're horified to find out that it's all over the place, it doesn't have. Agreat five ait doesn't have feeling at allther just miscommunication. You knowwhatever so systemizing to me involves it least at least an annual touchpointexperience that manes you document what the customer goes through, stepby stepor your product or for ox your main...

...products as it wever dog Foodi yourselforder, go through your website and order it go through your catalog,whatever it is, go to your retail ocation, you go there and youexperience that whole thing Anto end and you find out work in the magicaltouch be added throughout that dayg and it can be very difficult to dodepending on the complexity of your company, but I think it's critical todo it at least once a year. SOMPLAE someplace is probably even more that ifit's so important, but I was really recently- did VEBNB storyorgs the theentire thing, so they put every step of the way from going to their website,actually walking in the front door of that arented ARPNB, they det a storyboard and they make sure each touchpoint on there was kind of youknow a magical kind of experience, and I think that's what it takes. That's agreat recommendation, as you were talking, of course, I was walking out,as you were saying, this can sometimes be very complex or time consuming. I'malready thinking about the multiple subscription levels we have in thedifferent ways. People engage with us and walking through each of those. Youknow as an individual or for a team subscriber and all these other things,and we also have storyboarding up for different aspects of it. So great tipsthere. You also advocate theire, focusing on the customer right, so youknow some people think when they think of like a Steve Jobs, just go back tohim again that he's just an obsessive person. He has a very particularaesthetic and he really wants to focus Hor talk about the importance offocusing on these things, not just to control them, but specifically for thebenefit of the customer. Well I mean you have to you have tothink as the customer, because s founders, as you know, employees atthat companies, we tend to believe just you know, the whole company is ourlittle little piece of it. You know you're doing marketing. You know I'mdoing product whatever WK here, maybe I'm doing customer service. So yourcustomer service person thinks your a...

...customer service company, yourengineers, Sak you're, an engineering company. Your CEO thanks, your you knowan operation side company, that's actually not what the cusfor seas atall. They don't see your day today. They have no idea what you do on aDatabat. They don't care about your problems day today. They just careabout what it's like for them to deal with your company and that's why yougot to nw. You got to turn it around. You got to make it about them and it'shard, because if you have to basically forget how your company works- and this isgood- I've called this before almost a schedule, damn nasia. So when you'regoing to do your walk, though you have to forget how Ginny in the back inworks, you know me I'm going on my other forms, I'm thinking about. OhJeez, the engineering, a FISS, thelows, Peein Blabah. You know you need toapproach the whole thing as if you have no idea what the back in loks like howthe procedures work with that company. All you care about is your experience,so if you can kind of get at that level, I think that's where the the trewgenuses, like Steve Jobs and jepbeos kind of lie at it. Ust theythin knowexactthey're able to look at it with, I guess kind of treshouts. I guess, wouldbe the t main thing: theter yeah, the Anesia is definitely hard to come by. Iknow when I've tried to do the same thing. You know I'm always a a one stepahead, like I always try to et is word day dreaming and strategizing. Theseother things, I'm always just kind of like that's cool, but we're going toneed to do this this this this this to make it happen, and so it's reallydifficult to create that separation. I think that's probably why somecompanies higher secret shoppers and that type of thing to create a littlebit more of a true objective view. You also talk a little bit within productObsession About Superior Service wou've already, given several examples of that.But you have anything you want to share on either the importance or some someexecutables around truly providing a superior service like what is superiorfor you. It's actually that one. I take. I Astraight out of Aur core bout, that's one of our core values and the reasonwhy it's so critical superior service-...

...and you will see that a lot of thecompanies Crick we talk about pretty much. All of them can can be tag withthat kind of Odescription, because it's pretty much the only differentie youcan have when your competitors are one to click away these days. So you know Ican go. You know when I'm researching a product, I'm on Arazon and maybe I'm onanother website, maybe on another persons. You know better companies byside whatever. I have no idea the real difference. You know and the product.You really don't experience, you know until you get it, it's the supports andthe actual service that O get. That's probably the easiest differentiator todo, and this is amazing to me that a lot of companies especially start upstones, don't focus on this. You know they won't answer emails for days. Theyall have in a lot chat. They'll hide their phone number Ye. Now these thingsand I'm like wow, that's easily one of that's easily one of the ways you candifferentiate yourself between your thousands of competitors or hundreds oreven dozends. So if you're not focused on service you', better have some otherreally really good aspect of your product like it has to be so good that they don'tcare o service in tact. You know what I'm saying so yeah, but even even theNIFFO had had a great product and Grat Service Jeez. I don't. Even I don'teven know how you lose with that. Frankly right. That means that everycustomer s producing additional customers, because they can't not talkabout you, like the companies, we've already been talking about many times,I loved it. In that passage there you offered very specifically communicationchannels, as the specific mentions around service, because, just as youknow, you don't have to get everything perfect. If someone comes in with aquestion or even a complaint or a problem or something you don't have tonail it on the first try, you just need to communicate with them and let themknow they've been heard. Let them know that you're working on it and let themknow that a solution will be or some kind of resolve will be forthcoming. Ithink that that communication and...

...timely communication is so key because,in the absence of no, you know when someone's waiting fora response or waiting for return phone call or whatever I don't know about you,but I think on average you know our minds go to the negative like. Oh, itmust not be going in my favor, or else I might have heard back by now orwhat's going on there. Maybe there's no one there. Maybe I'm not going to getmy money back. All these other things so availability and communication isone of the easiest ways to set yourself apart in terms of service. Let's go tosuperpower number eight, because I think it's really important. I thinkit's especially important because you've already alluded to the you knowthe cross, functional nature of customer experience and and how a lotof people are responsible for it talk a little bit about the agency mindset.What is agency in particular, and how would you? How are you advising earlystage, people to build that mindset so agency mindset? A lot of peopleprobably aren't aware of the were being usin, a spanner, usually agency, theythink like advertising agency or whatever. This is the concept. If you have something to get done, itwill get done. You have, I you will impose your will on reality and youwill get things done that need to get done. You don't have to be reminded.You don't have to be prodded, you don't have to be constantly retrained coach or anything somebodywith an agencty miset. They have a tasks to do, whether it's given to themor whether it's you know internatly. You know from their ownwill they get it done and weve tranelated is the easy. You know.Agency is kind of e the Fanti they were the other one that most people arefarmiliar. Wor Is the phrase getter DUP and t yoothe, the country right nextstar of whatever that comedy was it's just Geti done do. Do they get the taskdone, and this is so it's easily the number one super power. I think in myout of my sixteen is my my number one...

...favorite it's easily. I think the mostimportant for any founder. It's basically imposing your will andreality. So if your Ersan, that can get things done, you're unstoppable in lifeyeah, I especially the way you described it right off the top therimposing your will on reality. I'm going to make this happen, even thoughit doesn't exist. Right now is about to exist, and as about to happen, let'ssay someone is a little bit. I would say his probably isn't a characteristicof most hard, corentrepreneurs and founders. But let's say someone needsto develop that more as a skill or you want to cultivate it in one of yourteam members. How do you develop that mindset for someone that might not bestrong in that area, because what I'm thinking of here is you know, based onwhat you've already shared here is. Okay know what the standards are. Iknow I need to experience the product. cand get a sense of what's good andwhat's bad about the experience, and I need to focus on the customer and Ineed to be great at service, but that involves getting a lot of things done.Some people aren't as strong willed or don't necessarily even have that senseof of I guess it's considered. An internal locus of control is anotherway to talk about agencies like I control what happens? How can someonecultivate that in themselves and or in their team members? I believe everyone has agency with that.You just have to like the futter, so the example of the book that I use isthat say you know just casually I mentionedto a friend: Maybe they only a thousand dollars. I say: Hey Ind, you know I Ikind of need that money back and I have it. You know at the end of the day, andyou know most of nothere's no way he's going to happen. It's not going tohappen. That's you know. Just you know, let's tell you O pownd SANDP basically,but if they needed a thousand dollars for a life saving medication, they culonly acquire by hustling running around, maybe baing pleading, maybe evenstealing, to save a love one's live. That's Goingto get done, okay. So it'sjust a it's a matter of kind of changing your mindset on. Is itimportant for me to get this done? Am I...

...going to place informance on that? Ifyou can kind of change your mindset on that? I think that's Stetenoa want tochange your mindset on how you even think of the concept of how you mitthing stuff is. It is a Muscito or is it ow, maybe I'll Kry, to do it andJeez it's not working out as harder like th. Just you know the you need to work on developating, justa little changin. Your mindset on the second ver important thing is that alot of employees you know when they think about hone you, like youmentioned they said if they get intimidate. I think I think the reasonis a lot of them over thinking. You know what what I read about in the bookis there's a very, very martial mindset to people with I against it. So how doyou lose Wei Wellue? You exercise and you eat less. I mean literally that's aperson with with agency, that's kind of how they think you they're not going togo into well depending on your bought tin, Tipe and if Youdr Lowcar di andyou no a thousand things and Oh Jeez, you got to do thes specific exercise,for you know if you overthink it, which is the bane of intelligent founders bythe way they just overpetint everything. If you start having this marshal kindof my set, almost a military mindset, I mentioned the famous yoga quote in inthe book: Do or do no, you know, there's no trim, so I think it's just aminset change, but it's also just a stuckover thinking. Change Yeah, it'sreally great. You also had another great quote around there from CarlYoung. You are what you do, not what you say: You'll do, which is just notthat far away from there to love that devastat like if you don't have,because I found that quote many many years ago- and I was like. Oh my God,I'm not a you know. A lot of people say what they you knowand that's their whole identity, but it just people care about what you do, notwhat you say so and that's a big way to get to Agencty, Beasstartin. To think like that, that's...

...great! It also produces integrity. Whenyou do what you say Y will do you know, and it's a holeness withinyourself and in your relationships with other people. I want to give you achance to talk a little bit about. You know what I think. We've been talkingabout a lot of the things you've learned over the past twenty years,working with so many different types of companies. I want to give you thechance to talk a little bit about about your company, which is called mycompany works, and you know what type of experience are you providing them?What is a typical engagement? Look like a- and maybe what are a few things thatyou know over the past seventeen years as you've been building and runningthis company in order to help other companies or help other people buildingroun their companies. You know what does that engagement? Look like whatare some things you've learned about the way you're serving them that you've,maybe tweeked or improved, or stop doing or added to the process? Well,yeah. So my company works by Coving Workscom is our central. We take all ofour orders on theline, so many many years ago there was kind of thiscomplicated process where you had to approach the secretary state ore, yourlocal county, filing offist, to go. Do all these things. Obviously thisprocess has been massively digitize. Even some states do the thing, but whatwe do is we help people start companies in all fisy states and all types. LFCscorporations, s corporations, you name it. So we provide a lot of kind of the silly red tape, paperwork,Corse startups and we've served over fiftysand people at this sowe thinkwe're pretty good. As far as the experience it's a very simple thing, soI mean it's so simple: It's actually panicky to some of our clients. Theyactually think. Oh, my God, that's it! It's five! Ten minutes on like yes, itreally is so we simlified it to the point where we can very basic data. Weneed to know the company name, we need to know a few names of and addresses of theowners and a little bit of data, sometimes Yoou stock. If wo're Goin todo a corporation, you provide plenty of...

Hellein walk through is about thesethings. We know the questions are going to ask, so we've answered them athousand times already and you know, and either on our website or an heworterforms themselves. So what we've done over the years hat? We continue tosimplify that to the point where, again, it's actually panicky to some people.They hit SOE men and Jeez. In a couple of days. They have a whole company,even when the tax id you know, everything is already done, and theycan't believe it so and at bragging about that. That's justsomething we. It took seventeen years to get there. You know, so the customers now are way moredemanding than they were two thousand and one. They thought this was magic,that they could do this online wie ton thousand and nineteen. They they havemuch higher. We have competitors all over the place, they're trying toundercut us so we have to. We have to really up our game. So what we've donean we built a lot of tools, a lot of free tools, a lot of customerexperience tools. I guess you could call them, for example, once colorstartup wizard, it shows a exactly step by step to do the post formation thingsa lot of people, don't know how to issue a stock in their company or adoptthe operating agreement or there's some weird things. If you want fechalcapital, eighty three BLECO thes Vario this- we organize that and a'm very,very simple step by stepwizard as custom ie, your stayin aie. So each O,the Delaware and I'll see everydhing is already there for you step by step toguy. So that's ver important. We Gon s lot of our clientites over ther fo'rehaving a hard time staying on top of the recurring stuff. So that's likeyour anyou reports. You know any wer neels stuff like that, so we built in in a reporterlork, so tit's justanother betfodt of using our service. You come in. Not only do you have tonot think about the whole starting of the company, you don't really have tothink about the mainteance of it so witl this we'll send you these alert.Well, se even show Yo. If you don't use us to like, for example, file your inyour pourt. We show you how to do it, so you do yourself. Youen Hav O pay ast SOS, is another free kind of thing...

...that we've provided over the years, butI will mention that two thousand and one customer is a dramaticallydifferent animal from a two thousand, and nineteen pustomer expectations areway higher. First Service experience, everythingelse yeah, you shared a lot of really really good stuff there and I'm goingto bottom line it. This way and correct me f. If I skip anything not tominimize it, anyone could just bounce back and listen to it all again, butit's know who your customer is pay attention to the way that expectationsare evolving. Look for places that add value and by ad value I m not using theword value generically. I'm saying find ways to solve other problems that yourcurrent customers have and use that as part of the service experience todifferentiate yourself from competitors Jeez. I don't disagree with one oneSetella of that. That's exactly perfect, exactly how I was CRAE, awesome 'm. Igot one more question for you just because it's you know it's somethingthat we talked about talking about before we hit record before. I go to mystandard clothes here. I want to know what or one or two of the most fatalmistakes that you see startups, making that can take them under and maybe howcan? How can those one or two fadal mistakes be avoided, so I go really heavily into avoidingmistakes in my book and the reason why I think mistakes, avoiding mistakes are,is much much better strategy than a thousand differnt to do list items thatyou can do that are like a positive thing. So what I mean by that is, ifyou can just avoid some of the big Tig mistakes, your change of successincrease dramatically. I mean dramatically so I discussed before thatsome of the life choices you know smoking drinking divorce, drugs. Youknow these things, bat relationships just just try to just avoiding the badthings that bad decisions in life ly...

...put you on the top twenty percent andthe same principle applies for business. So if you want to talk about one or twofirst, one founder disagreence, I speak from literal experience on this, but Ihave spoken to hundreds, if not thousands of people we have to dealwith this at my company. You Know Oh Jeez, I' it's not working out with mypartner. How do I get rid of a you know? It's like no there's stock involved now,there's legal issues. You have you know things that you need to take care of.So what I always say is you, you figure out exactly how much that person isgetting in stock and how much it work it requires for them on an ongoingbasis, because there's nothing that's going to hurt feelings more thansomeone who who its twenty five percent of the company, but they never evenshowup for the meetings or whatever they did. One thing for the first,maybe three months, maybe six months and then just disappeared Wut they own.You know he cort of the company, but everyone else is working ete ar so justat absolute devastating thing to companies thit's destroying morestartups than way. I can imagine, even before it doesn't matter how O Proctis,if the founders Don Ben along wow, what a really really bad time you're goingto have and then here's my second kind of a debt into that really reallyreconsider. The fifty split- and I stop if your have two founders or the thirtythreethirty three O. If you have three, really reconsider that a lot of people,a deadlocks, your whole company. So even if flip a coin someone's going naget fifty one someone's going to at forty nine that allows someone toprevent the deadlock in your company so to kind of moving along the secondbiggest one is easily parketing. I think a lot of people. You know theyreally have the field of drams, you don buildit and they will come, and that isJez that Ishe read about greak products or that happen, and I just took off andwow demand just kind of generated itself and in the rel world chees. Youknow the better marketer winns every...

...time. So if you don't think you're coolenough to say OAS cool enough to be marketing cool enough to have toactually go out there and actually work at that forputting your product, Iwould avie you to rethink that there's a whole chapter in my book aboutgrowing it. We go over that very simple things. A again it's just not makingmistakes have a decent website have some decent marketing materials. Youknow have a strategy for dealing with leads. You know, having a posted noteon your computer is not a strategy for dealing with leads yeah, even a Sprensheeis way better than that have something build some systems out, andyou will dramatically dramatically those two alone: The the founder issuesin the marketing easily Ao simple, but proven and difficult toexecute advice, really good stuff and just to tie the avoid mistakes thing tocustomer experience. Try Not to Piss people off and you're already ahead ofa lot of really terrible companies, thetd be a fun separate podcast, but weneed to wrap up Youre Mat. I've really enjoyed the time, and I always like togive you because relationships are our number one core value here at bombomband here on the customer experience podcast, I like to give you theopportunity to think or mention someone or people who've had a really positiveimpact on your life or career and to give another shout out, even thoughwe've done a few to a company. That's doing customer experience really wellwell as far as a person, and I'm not sayingit's relatedg to customer experience, but it's more of a philosophy ofbusiness is all robicant. I don't know if you know him he' famous long twitter,it's at n, Te Ball and aval. His footer count is the source of so much wisdom.I mean thet they're, calling him the angel philosopher at this point. He'she's also a startup boy been just so influential and he's not one of these.You know agro go get hem, you know pustate Husle, hostile business. Youknow he met takes for an hour day...

...before een gets to workand. He doesn'tdo anything, he doesn't like tistime and he's got he gruns Angeles. IfHEU've heard of that yeah so and Ans Angel Lis, the Guyis, the mostunstressed low stress, you know insightful guy, Awa Seein, my lifereally really aprocated. I used a lot of thispose in Y in my book, so lovinghe's been very, very influential. I Mea. As far as the compani es you know it'shard t to not sound. You know. Kind of just mundane, but you know southwest,has always been just a beautiful experience for me over decade. Literaldecades I used to live in Texas in the so you know I was a kid n the S, but inthe s that' even t back, then they were awesome, Amazon and Apple. I think I support those two companies right now,like basically unconditionally tr'there's. Almost nothing TEC. Do atthis point to disappoint me going to keep a going yeah keep the good stuffgoing and then recently I will just have a shot out to select quote. I was buying a simplewant to talk about Monday and I was buying a life insurance policy. Youknow your getting older, you have kids, you think about these things. You, likeGodit's Goinna, be awful, so that quote in an amazing job I mean their emails.EENO show. Do you get an email at the top of it's a little tracking meater?They show you exactly where you are in the process and how many more steps argoing to Gohere's the signature and here's t the quote and click here toaccept it Bam a couple days later after they get the medical reperds which theydid on their own. I didn't have to go to my doctors. I mean the whole thingwas done nd I was like this is really amazing so that he shows you what agood buser experience they do and I'll tell everyone about it. ' Telling youright now, oh your listeners. It's awesome that is tho benefit right thereof delivering great customer Ex custeer experience and superior service to usesome words from your book is that it ought your existing customers make newcustomers for you, because you've done...

...so well by them mad. This has been apleasure. How can someone connect with you or with my company works? Well, my company Workscom, obviously,is our eadquarters for everything. WERELATED START POC. We have a ton ofcontent on there blo. He rains INA twitter that my my company works mepersonally. You can het me up it. Matnycom Matt, kN eacom for twitter,matny and my emails on on the website as well. If you need to reach out orjust want to say, hi awesome man, I really really value your time in yourinsights, continued success to you. I love what you're doing. I thinkentrepreneurship is so important, so vitally and fundamentally important tothe health of our nation and to the world in general, just people gettingout there solving problems and creating jobs for each other. I think it'sawesome what you're doing wish you continued success and if you thelistener enjoyed this conversation, I encourage you to subscribe to thecustomer experience podcast. So you don't miss more great conversationslike this one. You are listening to the customerexperience podcast, no matter your role in delivering value and servingcustomers. You're intrusting, some of your most important and valuablemessages to faceless digital communication. You can do betterrehumonize. The experience by getting face to face through simple personalvideos, learn more and get started. Free at Bom Bomcom you've beenlistening to the customer experience podcast to ensure that you never missan episode subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player or visitbombomcom. Thank you so much for listening until next time.

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