The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

20. Why Obsession Is the Missing Ingredient in Your Customer Experience w/ Matt Knee

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

“Obsession is the complete micromanagement of the customer experience.”

According to Matt Knee, Founder and President of MyCompanyWorks and author of the book Startups Made Simple, obsession is a superpower.

Steve Jobs, Herb Kelleher, and Jeff Bezos each have/had it. There aren’t a lot of great companies whose founder wasn’t obsessed with seeing their vision of the perfect customer experience come to life.

Listen in to hear Matt share why obsession is so important and to hear about another superpower he thinks is even more important.

If you have something to get done, it will get done. You will impose your will on reality. You'relistening to the customer experience podcast, a podcast dedicated to helping today's growing businessesrestore a personal human touch throughout the customer life cycle. Get ready to hearhow sales, marketing and customers success experts surprise and delight and never lose signof their customers humanity. Here's your host, Ethan Butte. All right, ifyou are looking for better ways to start, grow or systemize your business, including the customer experience, you are in the right place. Our guesttoday makes starting and running a business simple, fast and inexpensive for entrepreneurs and advisers. His company landed on the ink five thousand. They have helped morethan Fiftyzero entrepreneurs start and manage their businesses over the past seventeen years. And, of course, as someone who knows startups and entrepreneurship so deeply and sowell, he's also the author of startups made simple, mattne, welcome tothe customer experience podcast. Thanks you even glad to be with you. Awesome. So we're going to start where I always start, and that is thedefinition of customer experience. When I say customer experience, what does that meanto you? What do you think about? Well, when I hear is it'sa very emotional thing to me. You know, it started a longtime ago when I just had these really fans plastic experiences with with other companiesand I started realizing that chess is an emotional thing that I'm having here.I'm actually connecting with these Tu I feel like this company knows me or theycare about me. Maybe they don't. They don't even do that in reality. It could be a scaled kind of automated thing. But even if it'sjust a feeling that that I get when I interact with certain companies, andyou can see it it sends to brands like Apple, people are fanatics aboutit. You make an emotional connection with someone and they will wait in linefor days to get your products and they...

...will love you and seeing your praisesforever. So for me it's always been kind of just an emotional connection.I love it. I've asked that question to more than two dozen awesome peopleand I've not heard it express so closely tied to the emotion in the feelingbefore. For you personally, what was an Aha moment? You know,you just mentioned apple there before we started recording. You talked about Southwest Airlines. What was a moment where you knew that southwest, for example, madeyou feel different? It started very long ago when I first started taking southwestairlines. Then you just got so entertained by their stewartists or Stewart attendants orwhatever, and they were actually hilariously funny and that was such a different experiencefrom playing don't talking back in early two thousand one, even before their earlytwo thousand what flag, I was just awful and it was just so sterileand southwest. Really it really made a difference in that industry. It's doneis as recent as of course, you mention an apple. You know I'ma fanatic for their products. I see them, I almost have to havethem. It's like they know me when they come out. So just thevery those are kind of very standard answers, but I have noticed in my owncompany if things don't feel right on how we're building stuff, whether it'sa very it can be very tactical stuff like emails. How do they look? How does the website look as a field? To The colors match tothe it does it emotionally come together as one whole? I guess is iswhere my concept comes from and it's what I try to assess on as afounder. I like that. I like that you said the word obsession andwhat you're talking about there none of us consciously says to ourselves, unless you'rea designer. Man, this website really comes together and nicely and makes mefeel like I'm going to, you know, a smart, clean, safe,productive place. But it's that feeling that we get. So the coolthing about what you did in your book, startups made simple, is that youbroke it down into superpowers, is...

...what you call them. You havethem in four categories, energy, vision, execution and leadership. I'd like tospend a few minutes on because I think it's the one most closely tiedto customer experience. I'd like to spend a few minutes on the superpower numberseven, product obsession. What does obsession mean to you in this context,and who should have this obsession? Very simple. It's complete micro management ofthe customer experience from the beginning by and it has to, almost always hasto be the founder. It's pretty if there's a you know, another seniorexecutive that that is passionate about it. But there's not a lot of company, gray companies, that don't have a founder that wasn't the driving force.If we go to even all the ones we've are we're all going to talkabout over and over Steve Jobs at apple the driving force, or Kelliher atsouthwest the driving force. On that, Jeff bezos Amazon the driving for thesepeople are micro managers when it comes to the experience. They go down.I mean we're talking Jeff Bezos knows that product page on Amazon like the backof his hand. It's not like he delegates that out. He knows exactly. I mean for better or worse. You know, there's a lot ofcriticisms on the Amazon product pages, you know, but it's what his visionis of an ideal customer experience. And then I don't even need to gointo the store, as I read a few in my book about Steve Jobsand his obsession. I mean this guy, this guy would not purchase a vehicleor would purchase a new vehicle every few months just so it didn't haveto have the California license played on it, because it broke the esthetics that hewanted to have on a day to day life. I mean just amazingstuff like that, and that's what I'm saying about obsession. Like if there'sa misspelling on my website, the email design, it does not vibe withthe actual website design, if we've done a logo change and the logos aren'tmatch up or something that drives me bumpers. So in I think it has tobe the founder that says hey,...

...you know what, this is incrediblyimportant to me. Maybe I'm a little obsessive, please understand this is soimportant to drive this experience and I think it has to be founder again.So that is a great answer and you you went to these high level leaders. The cool thing about that is that typically I would think that an earlystart up founder would be obsessed for a while and then maybe kind of turnsome of that off, but you've you know, you're talking about multi billiondollar companies and still having that leader that's deeply obsessed. And that actually goesinto one of your primary tips in that section, is is having written standards, talk about the importance of documenting or organizing, because because what you're talkingabout here with this micromanagement, in this obsession is very, very high andvery specific standards dictated from the top, and I use dictate specifically, andso you know, to make it work and to make it work across largeteams and large organizations. I'm assuming that's that's where you go to. Writtenstandards talk about the importance of organizing the standard specifically and documenting and sharing them. Well, you know, it's right in the title of my book aboutsystem so it is. It is. You can systemize these things, thesethings that are supposedly creative and intuitive. You can make systems for this andthere's a lot of companies that have a very, very good system at buildinggreat experiences for customers. So, whether it's a roadmap, whether it's dogfooding, you know what we call a dog food and using your own product, and you wouldn't believe how many people don't use that. Many founders don'teven know their own product having and use it and once they do, theirhorrified to find out that it's all over the place. It doesn't have agreat vibe it. It doesn't have to feeling at all. There's miscommunication,you know whatever. So systemizing to me involved at least at least an annualtouch point experience. That means you document what the customer goes through step bystep for your product or for Roducts,...

...your main products, as it were, work dog food it yourself. Order, go through your website, order it, go through your catalog, whatever it is, go to your retaillocation, you go there and you experience that whole thing and too end andyou find out work in the magical touch be added throughout that thing. Andit can be very difficult to do depending on the complexity of your company,but I think it's critical to do it at least once a year something someplaces probably even more that it if it's so important. But I was readingrecently that every and be storyboards the hut, the entire thing. So they putevery step of the way from going to their website to actually walking inthe front door of that rented AIRPNB, they did a storyboard and they makesure each touch point on there was kind of, you know, a magicalkind of sirs, and I think that's what it takes. That's a greatrecommendation. As you were talking, of course, I was walking out.As you were saying, this can sometimes be very complex or time consuming.I'm already thinking about the multiple subscription levels we have in the different ways peopleengage with us and walking through each of those. You know, it's anindividual or for a team subscriber and all these other things, and we alsohave storyboarding up for different aspects of it. So great tips there. You alsoadvocate their focusing on the customer. Right. So, you know somepeople think, when they think of like a Steve Jobs, just go backto him again, that he's just an obsessive person. He has a veryparticular esthetic and he really wants to focus or talk about the importance of focusingon these things, not just to control them, but specifically for the benefitof the customer. Well, I mean you have to you have to thinkas the customer because as founders, as you know, employees at that companies, we've tended to believe just, you know, the whole company is ourlittle little piece of it. You know, you're doing marketing, you know,I'm doing product whatever here. Maybe I'm doing customer service. So yourcustomer service person thinks you're a customer service...

...company. Your engineers, if you'rean engineering company, your CEO, thanks, you're, you know, on operationstide company. That's actually not what the customer seas at all. Theydon't see your day to day. They have no idea what you do ona data they don't care about your problems day to day. They just careabout what it's like for them to deal with your company. And that's whyyou got to you got to turn around, you got to make it about them. And it's hard because you have to basically forget how your company works. And this is, I've called this before, almost a scheduled the amnesia. So when you're going to do your walk through, you have to forgethow any in the back end works. You know, may I'm going onmy owner forms. I'm thinking about, oh Jeez, the engineers that fixedthe load speed and love. Well, you know, you need to approachthe whole thing as if you have no idea what the back end looks like, how the procedures work with that company. All you care about is your experience. So if you can kind of get at that level, I thinkthat's where the true geniuses like Steve Jobs and Jeff beagels kind of lie atit. Just they know exactly. They're able to look at it with,I guess, kind of crush out. I guess would be the main thingthat. Yeah, the Amnesia is definitely hard to come by. I knowwhen I've tried to do the same thing, you know I'm always a one stepahead. Like I always try to is word daydreaming and strategizing these otherthings. I'm always just kind of like, that's cool, but we're going toneed to do this, this, this, this, this to makeit happen, and so it's really difficult to to create that separation. Ithink that's probably why some companies higher secret shoppers and that type of thing,to create a little bit more of a true objective view. You also talka little bit within product Obsession About Superior Service. You've already given several examplesof that, but you have anything you want to share on either the importanceor some some executables around truly providing a superior service? Like what a superiorfor you? It's actually that one. I take straight out of our coreD that's one of our core values and the reason why it's so critical superiorservice. And you will see that a...

...lot of the companies we talk about, pretty much all of them can can be tagged with that kind of adescription, because it's pretty much the only differentiator you can have when your competitorsor one click away these days. So you know, I can go.You know, when I'm researching a product, I'm on Amazon, maybe I'm onanother website, maybe I'm on another person's, you know, better companies, website, whatever. I have no idea the real difference, you know, in the products, you really don't experience you know until you get it. It's the support and the actual service that you get that's probably the easiestdifferentiator to do. This is amazing to me that a lot of companies,especially startups, don't, don't focus on this. You know, they won'tanswer emails for days, they'll have in a lot chat, they'll hide theirphone number. You know these things and I'm like, wow, that's easilyone of them. That's easily one of the ways you can differentiate yourself betweenyour thousands of competitors or hundreds or even dozens. So if you're not focusedon service, you better have some other really, really good aspect of yourproduct. Like it. It has to be so good that they don't careto services back. You know what I'm saying? So, so, eveneven then, if you had had a great product and great service, cheese. I don't even I don't even know how you lose with that. Frankly, right, that means that every customers producing additional customers because they can't nottalk about you, like the companies we've already been talking about many times.I loved it in that passage there you offered very specifically communication channels as thespecific mentions around service because, just as you know, you don't have toget everything perfect. If someone comes in with a question or even a complaintor a problem or something, you don't have to nail it on the firsttry. You just need to communicate with them and let them know they've beenheard, let them know that you're working on it and let them know thata solution will be or some kind of resolve will be forthcoming. I thinkthat that communication, and timely communication,...

...is so key because in the absenceof no you know when someone's waiting for a response or waiting for a returnphone call or whatever. I don't know about you, but I think onaverage, you know, our minds go to the negative, like, Oh, it must not be going in my favor, or else I might haveheard back by now. Or what's going on there? Maybe there's no onethere, maybe I'm not going to get my money back, all these otherthings. So availability and communication is is one of the easiest ways to setyourself apart in terms of service. Let's go to superpower number eight, becauseI think it's really important. I think it's especially important because you've already alludedto the you know, the cross functional nature of customer experience and and howa lot of people are responsible for it. Talk a little bit about the agencymindset. What is agency in particular, and how would you, how areyou advising early stage people to build that mindset? So agency mindset.A lot of people probably aren't aware of the word being used in this banner, usually agency. They think like advertising agency or whatever. This is theconcept of if you have something to get done, it will get done.You have in you will impose your will on reality and you will get thingsdone that need to get done. You don't have to be reminded, youdon't have to be prodded, you don't have to be constantly retrained, coachedor anything. Somebody with an agency mindset they have a task to whether it'sgiven to them or whether it's you know internally, you know from their ownwill they get it done, and we've translated. Is the easy you know, agency is kind of the fancy word. The other one that most people arefamiliar work is the phrase get or dumb, and it's the country rightnext stars and whatever the that comedy was. It just get or done, dude. Do they get the task done? And this is so it's easily thenumber one superpower, I think, in my out of my sixteen,it's my my number one favorite. It's...

...easily, I think, the mostimportant for any founder. It's basically imposing your will on reality. So ifyour person that can get things done, you're unstoppable in life. Yeah,I will, especially the way you described it right off the top. They'reof imposing your will on reality. I'm going to make this happen, eventhough it doesn't exist right now. is about to existent, as about tohappen. Let's say someone is a little bit I would say this is probably, as in a characteristic of most hardcore entrepreneurs and founders. But let's saysomeone needs to develop that more as a skill or you want to cultivate itin one of your team members. How do you develop that mindset for someonethat might not be strong in that area, because what I'm thinking of here is, you know, based on what you've already shared here, is okay, know what the standards are. I know I need to experience the productand get a sense of what's good and what's bad about the experience and Ineed to focus on the customer and I need to be great at service.But that involves getting a lot of things done. Some people aren't as strongwilled or don't necessarily even have that sense of of I guess it's considered aninternal locus of control. Is another way to talk about agencies like I controlwhat happens. How can someone cultivate that in themselves and or in their teammembers? I believe everyone has an agency. With that you just have to likethe fire. So the example of the book that I use is thatsay, you know, just casually I mentioned to a friend maybe they onlya thousand dollars. I say hey, you know, I kind of needthat money back and I have it. You know, at the end ofthe day, and you know most of the way, he's going to happenis not going to happen. That's you know, just you know. Let'stell you a pas on stamp basically. But if they needed a thousand dollarsfor a life saving medication that they could only acquire by hustling, running around, maybe bagging, pleading, maybe even stealing to save a loved one's life, that's going to get done. Okay. So it's just it's a matter kindof changing your mindset on is it important for me to get this done? Am I going to place importance on...

...that? If you can kind ofchange your mindset on that, I think that's set number one to change yourmindset on how you even think of the concept of how you get things stuffis it? Is it a must do, or is it maybe I'll kind ofdo it and, Geez, it's not working out as harder than Ithought. I just you know them. You need to work on developing justa little changing your mindset on the second very important thing is that a lotof employees, you know, when they think about mind you, like youmentioned, they said they get intimidated. I think I think the reason isa lot of them overthinking. You know, what I read about in the bookis there's a very, very martial mindset to people with agency. Sohow do you lose weight? Well, you exercise and you eat less.I mean literally, that's a person with with agency. That's kind of howthey think they're not going to go into well, depending on your bottom type, and if you adopt the lowcarp Diet and you know a thousand things andOh Geez, you have to do this specific exercise for you know, ifyou overthink it, which is the bane of intelligent founders, by the way. They just overthink everything, if you start having this Marshall kind of mindset, also military mindset. I mentioned the famous yoga quote in the book door do not? You know. It's there's no truck. So I thinkit's just a mindset change, but it's also just a stop overthinking change.Yeah, it's really great. You also had another great quote around there fromCarl Young. You are what you do, not what you say or do,which is just not that far away from there. To love that devastating. It like if you don't have because I found that quote many, manyyears ago and I was like, Oh my God, I'm not even youknow a lot of people say what they you know, and that's their wholeidentity. But it just people care what you do, not what you say. So, and that's a big way to get to agents take because startingto think like that, that's great.

Also produces integrity. When you dowhat you say, will do, you know, and it's a wholeness withinyourself and in your relationships with other people. I want to give you a chanceto talk a little bit about, you know what I think we've beentalking about a lot of the things you've learned over the past twenty years workingwith so many different types of companies. I want to give you the chanceto talk a little bit about about your company, which is called my companyworks. And you know, what type of experience are you providing them?What is it typical engagement look like? And and maybe what are a fewthings that you know over the past seventeen years as you've been building and runningthis company in order to help other companies or help other people build and runtheir companies? You know, what does that engagement look like? What aresome things you've learned about the way you're serving them that you've may be tweakedor improved or stop doing or added to the process? Well, yeah,so my company works like company Workscom is our central we take all of ourorders online. So many, many years ago there was kind of this complicatedprocess where you had to approach the secretary of State or your local county filingoffice to go do all these things. Obviously this process has been massively digitize. Even some states do the the thing. But what we do is we helppeople start companies in all fifty states and all types, WELC's corporations,as corporations, you name it. So we provide a lot of kind ofthe silly red tape paperwork course startups and we've served over Fiftyzero people at thisso we think we're pretty good as far as the experience. It's a verysimple thing. So I mean it's so simple it's actually panicky to some ofour clients. They actually think, Oh my God, that's it. It'squite ten minutes on. Yes, it really is. So we've simplified itto the point where we take very basic data. We need to know thecompany name, we need to know a few names of in addresses of theowners and a little bit of data sometimes about stock if you're going to doa corporation. We provide plenty of help...

...and walk throughs about these things.We know the questions are going to ask, so we've answered them a thousand timesalready, and the online, you know, in either on our websiteor any order forms themselves. So what we've done over the years, becausewe continue to simplify that to the point where, again, it's actually panickyto some people. They get submit and Geez, in a couple of daysthey have a whole company, even when the tax id you know, everythingis already done and they can't believe it. So and are bragging about that.That's just something we it took seventeen years to get there, you know. So the customers now are way more demanding. And they were two thousandand one they thought this was magic, that they could do this online.By two thousand and nineteen they they have a much high we have competitors allover the place. They're trying to undercut us. So we have to wehave to really up our games. So what we've done is we've built alot of tools, a lot of free tools, a lot of customer experiencetools, I guess you could call them. For example, once called our startup wizard. It shows them exactly step by step to do the postformationthings. A lot of people don't know how to issue the stock in theircompany or adopt the operating agreement or there's some weird things. If you wantventure capital, eighty three be elections, these various things. We organize thatin a very, very simple step by step wizard as custom bies to yourstate and he so you chose the Delaware LLC. Everything is already there foryou, step by step, to guide. So that's very important. We noticea lot of our clients over the years we're having a hard time stayingon top of the recurring stuff. So that's like your in your reports,you know, any renewals, stuff like that. So we built in anda report alert. So that's just another beefit of using our service. Youcome in, not only do you have to not think about the whole startingof the company, you don't really have to think about the maintenance of it. So well, this will send you these alert and we'll huven show youif you don't use us to like, for example, file you're in yourreport. We show you how to do it. So you do yourself.You're not pay us to do it.

So this is another free kind ofthing that we've provided over the years. But I will mention that a twothousand and one customer is a dramatically different animal from a two thousand and nineteen. Customer expectations are way higher for service experience everything else. Yeah, youshared a lot of really, really good stuff there, and I'm going tobottom line it this way and correct me if I if I skip anything,not to minimize it. Anyone could just bounce back and listen to it allagain, but it's know who your customer is, pay attention to the waythat expectations are evolving. Look for places that add value, and by addvalue I'm not using the word value generically. I'm saying find ways to solve otherproblems that your current customers have and use that as part of the serviceexperience to differentiate yourself from competitors. Geez, I don't disagree with one one Sintillaof that. That's exactly perfect, exactly. I would describe it awesome. I'm I got one more question for you, just because it's you know, it's something that we talked about talking about before we hit record, beforeI go to my standard clothes here. I want to know what are oneor two of the most fatal mistakes that you see startups making that can takethem under and maybe how can how can those one or two fatal mistakes beavoided. So I go really heavily into avoiding mistakes in my book, andthe reason why is I think mistakes, avoiding mistakes, are is much,much better strategy than a thousand different to do list items that you can dothat are like a positive thing. So what I mean by that is ifyou can just avoid some of the big, big mistakes, your chances of successincrease dramatically. I mean dramatically. So I've discussed before that some ofthe life choices, you know, smoking, drinking, divorce, drugs, youknow these things, bad relationships, just just trying to just avoiding thebad things, that, bad decisions and like easily put you in the toptwenty percent. And the same principle applies...

...for business. So if you wantto talk about one or two, first one founder disagreements. I speak fromliteral experience on this, but I have spoken to hundreds, if not thousands, of people. We have to deal with this at my company. Youknow, Oh Geez, I'm it's not working out with my partner. Howdo I get rid of it? You know, it's like no, they'restock involved. Now there's legal issues you have, you know, things thatyou need to take care of. So what I always say is you youfigure out exactly how much that person is getting in stock and how much workit requires for them on an ongoing basis, because there's nothing that's going to hurtfeelings more than someone who who gets twenty five percent of the company butthey never even show up for the meetings or whatever. They did one thingfor the first maybe three months, maybe six months, and then just disappeared. But they own, you know, the Court of the company but everyoneelse is working a y r. So just absolute devastating thing to companies.It's destroyed more startups than I can imagine even before. It doesn't matter howwhether the product is if the founders, hope, get along. Wow,what a really, really bad time you're going to have. And then here'smy second kind of a Dendom of that. Really, really reconsider the fifty splitand stop if you're have two founders or the thirty three. Thirty three, you know, if you have three, really reconsider that. A lot ofpeople. A deadlocks your whole company. So even flip a coin, someone'sgoing to get fifty one, someone's going to make forty nine. Thatallows someone to prevent the deadlock in your company so to kind of move along. The second biggest one is easily marketing. I think a lot of people,you know, they really have the field of dreams. You know,build it and they will come, and that is Geez. That is youread about great products or that happened and it just took off and wow,demand just kind of generated itself, and that in a real world cheese.You know, the better marketer win every time. So if you don't thinkyou're cool enough to do sales, of...

...cool enough to do marketing, coolenough to have to actually go out there and actually work at that provoding yourproduct, I would advise you to rethink that. There's a whole chapter inmy book about growing it. We go over that very simple things again again. It's just not making mistakes. Have a decent website, have some decentmarketing materials. You know, have a strategy for dealing with leads. Youknow, having a posted note on your computer is not a strategy for dealingwith leads. Even a spreadsheet is way better than that. Have something,build some systems out and you will dramatically, dramatically. Those two alone the founderissues in the marketing easily. That talks to I think, simple butproven and difficult to execute advice. Really good stuff. And just to tiethe avoid mistakes thing to customer experience, trying not to Piss people off,and you're already ahead of a lot of really terrible companies. That be afun separate podcast, but we need to wrap up here. Matt. I'vereally enjoyed the time and I always like to give you because relationships are ournumber one core value here at bombmb and here on the customer experience podcast.I like to give you the opportunity to think or mention someone or people who'vehad a really positive impact on your life or career and to give another shoutout, even though we've done a few, to a company that's doing customer experiencereally well. Well, as far as a person, and I'm notsaying it's related to customer experience, but it's more of a philosophy of business, is all Robert Khant. I don't know if you know him. He'sfamous on twitter. It's at the ball and AB Al. His twitter countis the source of so much wisdom. I mean that they're calling him theangel philosopher. At this point he's he's also a start up boyd been justso influential and he's not one of these you know, agro go, getthem, you know huscle Hustle, hustle...

...business. You know he's he metTates for an hour day before even gets to work and he doesn't do anything. He doesn't like to fun and he's got to eat. Runs angelist.If you've heard of that company? Yeah, so and owns angelists. They thinkguy is the most unstressed, low stress, you know, insightful guideever seen in my life. Really really appreciated. I use a lot ofhis quotes in my in my book, so loving. He's been very,very influential on me. As far as the company's Jeez, you know,it's hard to to not sound, you know, kind of just mundane.But you know, southwest has always been just a beautiful experience for me overdeck at literal decades. I live in Texas and the S S, soyou know I was a kid in the S, but in the s that'seven that. Back then they were awesome. Amazon and Apple. I think II support those two companies right now like basically unconditionally. There's there's almostnothing they do at this point to discipline. stuff going. And then recently,I will just have a shout out to select quote, I was buying asimple you want to talk about, Monday and I was buying a life insurancepolicy. You know, you're getting older, you have kids, you think aboutthese things. You like that is be awful. Select quote did anamazing job. I mean their emails even showed you. You get an emailat the top of it's a little tracking weater. They show you exactly whereyou are in the process and how many more steps is going to go.Here's The d signature and here's the quote and Click here to accept it.and Bam, a couple days later, after they get the medical records,which they did on their own, I didn't have to go to my doctors. I mean the whole thing was done and I was like wow, thisis really amazing. So that is shows you what a good bust our experiencethey do and I'll tell everyone about it. I'm telling you right now, allyour listeners, it's awesome. That is to benefit right there of deliveringgreat customers, Customer Experience and Superior Service. To use some words from your bookis that it ought your existing customers make new customers for you because you'vedone so well by them. Matt,...

...this has been a pleasure. Howcan someone connect with you or with my company works? Well, my companyWorkscom, obviously, is our headquarters for everything related to startups. We havea ton of content on their blog. He rings in a twitter ors thatmy company works me personally. You can hit me up at Matt Mecom andMatt K and ECOM or our twitter matt me, and my emails on thewebsite as well. You need to reach out. He just want to sayhi. Awesome, Matt. I really really value your time and your insights. Continued success to you. I love what you're doing. I think entrepreneurshipis so important, so vitally and fundamentally important to the health of our nationand to the world in general, just people getting out their solving problems andcreating jobs for each other. I think it's awesome what you're doing, whichyou continued success and if you, the listener, enjoyed this conversation, Iencourage you to subscribe to the customer experience podcast so you don't miss more greatconversations like this. One. You're listening to the customer experience podcast. Nomatter your role in delivering value and serving customers, you're in trusting some ofyour most important and valuable messages to faceless digital communication. You can do better. rehumanize the experience by getting face to face through simple personal videos. Learnmore and get started free at bomb bombcom. You've been listening to the customer experiencepodcast. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to theshow in your favorite podcast player or visit bombombcom. Thank you so much forlistening. Until next time,.

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