The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

22. Rehumanize Your Business by Building Relationships Through Video w/ Ethan Beute

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ethan Beute is on a mission to connect people. His method?

Video.

More specifically, his company BombBomb wants us to use the power of video to leverage our personal connections, and provide meaningful social interactions. 

Video is the way of the future. In this episode he shares how easy it is to get deeper in your relationships to improve your video, by using your smartphone and connecting with people around the world. 

 

One of the reasons some of you chosethe business that inere in is that it allows you to connect with other peopleand allows you to help people or challenge people or support people orlove people or Pak people on the back or give people a kick in the ass whenthey eat it. We are here to be in relationship with other people. You're listening to the customerexperience podcast a podcast dedicated to helping today's growing businessesrestore a personal human touch throughout the customer life cycle, getready to hear how sales marketing and customer success experts surprise anddelight and never lose sign of their customers. Humanity here is your host.EFEN BEAUTE, Hey! Welcome to a new and uniqueepisode of the Customer Experience Podcast, you ave been with us for awhile. First thank you and second you've probably identified that werelease a new interview every Tuesday, with people in a variety of roles, in avariety of industries who are leading the way in improving the way we createand deliver experiences for our customers. It's a really valuable,important and fun ongoing conversation that helps us all. Be More effectiveevery day, because there's nothing more important that we're doing every singleday as individuals, teams and his organizations than creating anddelivering better experiences for our customers. Now I also fold into thatone interview with a fellow bombomb team member every month to round thatconversation out and talk about some of the things that we're seeing and someof the things that we're struggling with and improving on in our ownbusiness. In this episode, you'll hear a presentation I gave recently now I cowrote a book with Steve, Passinelli, longtime friend and our chief marketingofficer here, a Bombam. It's called rehumanize your business, how personalvideos accelerate sales and improve customer experience. So I share in thispresentation three fundamental truths that were revealed to us and thingsthat we were reminded of in the process of writing the book and what you'regoing to get when you listen to. This is a new way to think about the wayyou're connecting and communicating with your customers and some of thereal deep reasons and motivations and excitements and opportunities andpassions that we can have in that process. For context, I delivered thispresentation, as the closing session at our first ever live event calledrehumanize. It was a video summit, it was two and a half days long and I hadthe privilege and challenge of closing the event down was something that wasmeaningful, valuable and that tied the event together. I hope I achieve thatand I hope you enjoy this presentation called Rehumanize Your Business. I knowyou've picked up tons of ideas over the past two and a half days been absoluteprivilege to share this event with all of you. This is withfor and by all ofyou, this is a community advantage, O privilege to share it with you. Youprobably have a lot of tactics, you've written down someod, maybe thinkingabout got lit up on. I want to leave you or start this and leave the eventwith a couple related questions and the first one is how many contacts do youhave in your phone right now or how many people are you connected to onsocial or how many people are in your database or your crm? How many is thatI don't need everybody. I mean the good ones like the as and the bees and thefamilies and the friends people you could call up and say I need a hundredbucks and you probably don't need a hundred bucks, but someone that youwould ask that to, and they would say yes, I'm all in right. How many is thit?Is it two hundred and fifty five hundred? Maybe a thousand people, maybeand now think in the past year, how many of thosepeople have ye spoken with or spent time with in person? Half, maybe if you're super lucky andyour starting number was low, a third a quarter, probably ten percent right.What would it mean to your business if you just took two three four minutes inthe morning and send two videos a day to people in your phone or people thatyou see on social that had something good or bad happen that you maybe mightwant to convect with what would...

...happened if you sent two videos a dayto Geu about five minutes, it's ten videos a week, ot five hundred videos ayear. He might look back and say Gosh. I can never do five hundred videos in ayear, but what, if you just reached out to two people a day, just to say hi orthank you, wor I've been thinking about you where I saw timmy made captain tothe soccer team. That's so awesome! I hope he has a great season or I'm sorryto hear about your grandmother or Gosh, I'm so proud of you. I'm really excitedfor. What's next in this phase of your life, what would happen if you just didthat a couple times a day? Would it be good for Your Business? Itprobably be amazing for Your Business, but let's put that on the side for aminute, because this is rehumanized, it does all tie together. That's not allof what it's about think about what it means for you to be in front of all thepeople who matter most to your life and your business ind, a truly personal wayfor you to be seen and heard and felt and understood moreoften, every single day the conversations that start insibility foryou to be seen and heard it's all. You really want. So many of the decisionsyou make the clothes you wear. The way we carry ourselves is all fundamentallyaround wanting to be seen and hurt. I need people to know who I am. I needthat in my life we all needed a DAB, fundamental human level. Even moreimportantly, what would it mean for those five hundred people for you toreach out in a personal way, with a video one to one that allows them toknow that they've been seen and heard and fell and understood? I'm so sorryto hear about your grandmother. That's a big deal. That's all any of us wantswo are so desperate, especially so much of our work and our lives becomedigital were so desperate for that, and so that's, where we're going to starthere. This is rehumanize your business. Raise your hand if you know that thisbook exists. Awesome, that's great! An now, keepyour hand up. If this is still true of you, you can put it down if it's nothow many F, you have ordered this book awesome. How many of you have startedreading a book good good hand still up if this isstill true? How many have you read most or all of the book killer? Laugh whane.I promise keep your hand up. How many do you've left in Amazon Review need those amosators? No guilt, noguilt! Thank you! So much no GE, we need those amons out. REVEWis Jave said this book has been very, very well received. We just released ittwo weeks ago. It's been a number one best seller and Amazon and businesscommunication, business sales and customer relations. It's superrelevant!Thank you when you help make it happen again. This is a community event andit's the number one best selling book for eight hundred CEO read, whichexclusively does business books in bolt for the entire month of April Thas, thenumber one best seller and it's week of release. It was number twenty threeoverall in barns and noble and number seventeen overall and hard cover soreally well received, and our names are on the cover steves in Mineare, butobviously represents the work of dozens and dozens of people and and act. Infact, many of you in the room are included in the book and or we couldhave should a would have included you in the book. But editing is going to bea theme here. We could not get everything in there, and so this isreally a celebration of all of you, so I don't want to get an oprah on you,but wwe brought kids. We've got one for all of you look Utdofyour chair, I'm just kidding stot Ou of your chair, they're, all outsidethey're, all outside beautifully stacked on tables, and one of those isyours on the way out, and so it's a twenty fivear book I mean I sawwith these hotel rooms, cost so clas to you. It's just our way of saying thankyou and leaving you with something that you can carry forward and maybe pick upon what you're going to get when you getthat book. Is it's the definitive guide, Tho, better business communication? Ithink you all understand it after...

...spending two and a half days with yourfriends and peers and with all of us in this community, it's all about therelationships through video movement. You've learned a lot of tactic. Some ofthose we buck it into marketing through video. This book is exclusively aboutrelationships through video. What is it and what isn't it? Why does this matter? Why does thismatter to you? Why does this matter to your clients? Why does this matter toyour family? What does matter to your your business partners and other peoplethat are involved? Why should you participate in it who's actually doingit again. This is kind of a great woomb for it, because youalready get it, and many of you are included in the book already, we'vetaught from your examples, but for the person who would never come to thisevent. They don't know that it exists. They don't know that this is a realopportunity. They don't know that every day, they're rere lying on plane, typedout text that doesn't differentiate them. That doesn't fueld trust, itdoesn't feild report and it doesn't communicate nearly as well. If you justlook someone in the eye through the Lens just spoke to them person toperson, that's a book that can serve these people as well, so they want toknow who are these people and what are they doing? What are you actuallysending video instead of playine typed out text? I think you're going to findsome great examples in there and how do you actually do it most y? You probablyunderstand how, but how to put a video in an email. How do yo put a video in atext message? How do you put a video in a linkedon message or a facebookmessage, so we go wit, go through all that and we have a ton of advancedstrategies. So how do you get more email opens? How do you get more linkclicks? How do you get more replies and responses? How do you get more peopleto play the video way of all that and follow up strategies? What do you dowhen you send a video email to sixty people, as Jeff wagener did he'stalking about here? What do you do with all the people who opened it but didn'tplay the video or, let's see you, send a oneto one, video email? What do youdo with that person who opened the email they played the video, but theynever replied, responded click the link or tip you up on the opportunity thatyou presented to them in that video email. So we have all of that Antalucto the future. It's funny wily when Theyre, our publisher was writing aboutit. They talkd about the last chapter, the book and they say they opine on thefuture of this dynamic movement. I was like that sounds really good, and thenI looked up opine and it's just the verb version of opinion. That isexactly what we did, but it's you know that hind of thrilling it sounded realylike really cool. When I read that, so here are three fundamental truths thatreymerged top of mind in the process of working with so many people on theBombam team and with Steve I'm getting this thing into your hands againwaiting for you outside the room. First, one this one should be a no brainerrelationships are the whole point they're the whole point. They are whywe are here. We are here to be in relation with other people. One of thereasons some of you chose the business that ore in is that it allows you toconnect with other people and allows you to help people or challenge peopleor support people or love people or Pak people on the back or give people akick in the ass when they need it. We are here to be in relationship withother people where social creatures were fellow human beings and ultimately,our experience here, no matter what we do is about being in relationship andbeing in connection with other people, and so it's we went through thisprocess. Hese you just three quick and easy examples. I could have given youdozens, but they only gave me thirty five minutes and it's a privilege as westarted going down the road of how to write a book and how to publish a book.It immediately became clear that there were all these multiple pats like,though, how to write a book had all these forks in the road and how topublish it all these forks in the road like what are we going to do, and so,instead of just taking some guesses and making some bets, I decided to rereadbooks written by people. I personally reach out to them and say what you talkto me about how you wrote and publish your book and, of course, all sixpeople. I ask said yes, because people love to help each other. We love toshare our experience. I is just wonderful. I got so much great advicefrom these people. I talke with people who self publishing people who hadpublishing deals. I talked with a...

...gentleman who strayged, U hold thimselfin a room, wrote for fourteen to sixteen hours a day and got his bookwritten in less than two weeks. I also talked with a guy who said a goodfriend of mine, an active consultant who could only just ship away at iteach morning it took hem about two years to do. We took a couple two weekperiods here and there where he could to really knock out some larger piecesof word. So we got in this full picture of all these different forks and whichones might be right for us and ED. You Know Chris Smith, curator, so wrote theconversion code. It's up here on the screen. I sent him a video email oneafternoon about nine or ten months ago, and I saw because, of course, we trackeverything. I could see him open and see him play the video immediately andit was with this request. He didn't reply to the email he didn't text me.He straight up picked up the phone and called me. This is like at four thirtymountain, which is six thirty in Orlando, where he is. He just called mealmost instantly and gave me about seventy five minutes of his time. He'sself published and been published. Super Super Helpful people want to helpwhen someone reaches out to you. Are you not Enger to share your experienceand be a value? Of course you are because it allows us to be inconnection with other people, and so these folks were awesome and helpful.Zinon recognize these real estate mortgage professionals. Good, I'm glad thate was a laugh, I'mglad that was a Clab, because you were just here with you and they're stillhere with you. These are just three of about three dozen customers whoseexamples we share and talk about Iin the book. The reason these three peopleare in the book is the same reason that these three people are on the stagewhich the same reason that they've been an ablog post or a Webinar or stagepresentation or one of our downloadable PDF, is because they get out there.They do it, they try it. They learn, they fail Ruby's. The process sheiterated on it multiple times before she got to work. We saw here, but theydon't hoard these things when they work, they don't hide them and keep them tothemselves and say I have a really great strategy and when t keep it allin myself, you are your own best differentiater. So why not share?What's working with video and that's what these people do, these peopleeveryone reached out to to say heys it cool. If I share your story in a book,because our publisher waneed that kind of level of clearance they didn't wantsomeone to be surprised and get angry, I don't know why they would ever thinkthat anyone would, but it's because of the nature of the community that I workin. Of course, no one gave me resistance or flak. Of course everyonewas super excited. Of course they shared this with their family andfriends, because that's the type of community that we have all builttogether. This is your community. You might recognize two or three of these gentlemen. Theyare three of ten people who are kind enough to review, advance copies of thebook and Say Really Nice things about them. We went a little bit traditionalhere getting nice words on the on the back of the jacket and inside the frontcover of the book. We went that rout in and so several bombomb team membersknow town ferry personally he's a text. Messager of phone call away number onereal estate coach. He was very helpful instantly. What can I do? How can Ihelp? When can I buy Hem? No Dude? We just need you to look at this advancedcopy and say something nice about it right, but it's amazing, Adam Conto,Staran Gauson has been building that relationship with him because they justgot along famously from the Getgo years ago, when he was running franchisesales. He was in charge of a team of people that was responsible forgenerating remax, franchises and five or six promotions later he's the CEO ofthe company and he's a personal friend of many people on the team. But it'sbecause of all that time, that's invested along the way, sincererelationship, and so when it comes time to say, Hey woald are you interest inparticipating, an email or a phone call away. Daniel pint did raise your handif you're familiar with Daniel Pink in his work. Okay, cool, not as Muny as Ithought, not as impressive as I thought he's a number one best selling authorhe's written about a half dozen Number One New York Times, Wall Street Journal,Washington, thost, best sellers drive, which is the science of motivation n.What motivates us, when is his newer book? The science of perfect timing inthe book that we lean down was to sell as human, which makes the argument thatliterally all of us are in sales.

Everyone's room is pretty much in sales,but other people outside this community don't necessarily see themselves insales. Even though every single one of us is so, we go way way back Dan Pink,and I you know we don't. I didn't know him at all, and he didn't know me, butI reached out to him he's going to blow your mind with avideo email and but but it was awesome, subject line on page one hundred N,seventy eight of Tasella's human dot, dot dot what authors not going to openthat right and then when he opens it up, of course, we present a nice littleanimated preview and I have written on a white board. I quote him and hisargument for why video is such a great tool and it's because it blends theefficiency of electronic communication right. We like to live in these digitalchannels, because it's quick and easy, but it blends it with the warmth ofyour face and voice and personality. So we love his ideas. We love hisarguments. He advocates for video. Why not reach out to him see if he wouldengage on it? It was kind of a long shot. I guarantee you one hundredpercent hundred percent that the reason he engaged on this because I guaranteehe also gets many unsolicited manuscripts in hopes of getting someonewho's done. This a half dozen times at the highest level to helps to help themdo it. I reached out with a sincere personal deal. I didn't blindly reachout to a bunch of best selling authors to say, Hey and throw a bunch of linesin the water and hoping something would go. I said: Hey Man, I love your work.I saw you speak two years ago I read, the cell is human three times in fact,stephe and I lean on it multiple times in this book that we just wrote herethe reasons we did that and by the way you lean down video in there. That'swhat this is all about, and so I guarantee that is exactly why heengaged targeted personal. He felt a little bit like he knew me even if hedidn't like me, he at least felt some sense of socialreciprocity like at's, guys pretty sincere. He means it, and so, when wereach out to people with video, it can build relationship even where there wasnot one to start and it's a zillion times better than plaing type out text.Now you, if you remember Steece presentation yesterday, this is fromour visitto eight hundred CEO read again. These folks have beenspecializing N, bult, purchasing a business books exclusively for thirtyfive years. They are experts in what they do in a way they're kind of ananti Amazon so that gentleman arrand behind the stack of book there. He wasan email signature to me and we'd, maybe spoken on the phone once superresponses and Professional. But we didn't know him, and so we madecommitments to sign about eleven hundred copies of the book. Stephen Idid and in. In fact, your book waiting for you outside is signed by bothSteveand me and Sureand, and so we knew that that was going to happen.So we reached out to ar and like Aron Man, we got ta sign like eleven hundredcapies e book. He said, okay, I said how do we do that? He said well, whatwe typically do. Is We SHIFP them to you? You open them all up, sign themall box them up and ship them back. It's like Thatcause, that's not soundskind of stupid, so I talked to Steve Two seconds later we're like no. That'swe're not going to do that. We're not going to shit the books, we're going toship ourselves we're going to spend the day in Milwaukee Wisconsin at eighthundred cgeo read this guy's going to be a business partner with us for years.Just on this book alone, if we decide to write another one which we aretalking about its years away, don't pressure me these arethey're awesome people and,and they do exactly what we need done it and they do a great job of theirbusiness partners of ours. Why not for almost the same cost, much faster, justshow up in person? ND spend some time, so it took us about a half day to signall those books, and during that time we got to know Aaron really really well.We talked about music, we talked about sports, we talked about food, we talkedabout beer, we talked about books, we talked about business, we talked aboutbusiness books, we talked out there's a...

...lot of books designs. We d a lot oftalking and and ther CEO came in. She was amazing, super personal, so happyto have us there Steve mentioned yesterday, were like the third authorever to do it this way, even though it was instinctively what we knew wasright like. Why would we pay all the money to shift these books back andforth and we can just get on a plane and go hang out in Thi Waukee? It wasso much better and the CEO gave us a great lunch recommendation that wewould have completely missed. Had We not spent fifteen twenty minutes withher? So, of course we shauter a video outside that restaurant that videos todate has been played twenty two times. It was a onedo one, video email. Iguarantee she shared it with the whole company. Who Do you think they're goingto invite to their next party Steve He's so much handsomer than I am so by the way these boxes no joke on thisone. So these boxes, each box has twenty books in it. We decided to dosomething fun here am going to get Oprah on you this morning. At sixthirty, while you were at starbucks or sleeping or at the gym or watching thesnow out your window, I was down here. I taped five of these. They look justlike this they're under five cheers in this room. Right now, so feel free tolook directly under your chair. There's one right there. Congratulations and ifyour neighbor has left congratulations, you can clean his or her box of books.Just connect with me, afterward or I have two email addresses on there,connect with me in person or reach out to that email address next week. Wewill send you a box of books. Sure othis message is super importantand we want to get it out there. We know that you understand the message,so those books are for your team or your clients. It's super appropriate toalmost anyone working in a professional capacity check out this bootlegstanding desk. This is buleg. That's a that's a step, stool! That's anexercise step! That's a stack of cookbooks that is do like in it's Ot,an old fashioned TV stand. If you were in the first chapter of the book, youknow how important it would be for me to go, live and work for my dad's housefor a month build thisleg standing desk, because I really like standing while Iwork. If you read the first chapter and when you read the first Chapper, youknow how important it was for me to spend that month with him. He'llunderstand why I got zero resistance and in fact, a lot of encouragement andsupport from my team members in going away and spending a month there and my dad seventy six he still works everyday leaves, it least you work at five thirty in the morning es a childpsychiatrist. So I would get up at five every day, hang out with them for ahalf hour, drink coffee make a green drink for later in the day and see himoff to work. And then I would just go to this pootlike standing desk andright for about two hours and then I go outside for a run, take a quick showerand then I would meet up with Steve by zoom he's outside Philadelphia. My Dadlives in Michigan and the really unique dynamic here is that typically, I'm twohours behind Steve so sometimes I'll show up at the office at six, thirty orseven, which is eight thirty or nine his time and well do like an earlymeeting before the rest of the office kind of gets going. But here on thistrip, we had a different working dynamic, a deeper like we've workedtogether for years. We worked together great, like it was a no brainer tocoathrough this book together and but this brought a different dynamicbecause we're able to cowork side by side in Rheel time for two or two and ahalf hours a day, while the rest of the office was still kind of getting itselftogether back in Colorado. So so many moments along this journey wereunique to me and special to me and and reminded me that relationships are thewhole point. So here's the takeaway on point, one of three, your success isenabled your real success. Your true success. Those moments in your lifethat make a difference are are made possible when you unlock theopportunity to work with through and for other people. Is that true? It'scompletely true and it's so easy to...

...lose sight up. That's why I made it.One of my three points. Relationships are the whole point number two. Youcannot edit what is not written. You cannot take the second step until youtake the first step. You cannot optimize a process that is not running.You cannot improve something that does not exist. You cannot edit what is notwritten so those things that you're sitting on could ave shit of WOATA. Youneed to start those things and they're not going to be perfect out of the gatecheck this out. That's a super legit standing death. That is so real. Lookat that an so tidy. That is, if you're wondering that is in the corner of mykitchen, in one tousand, nine hundred and fifty two brickanstacco ranch inColorado Springs about two two miles south of the office which is indowntown Colorabi Springs. If you were to list this home for sale, you'd usethe adjective cozy, and everyone would know exactly what you meant so in the cozy corner in my kitchen, atthe super legit standing death Steve and I continued to work together. Thisis where the final third of the book was written and you can't edit whatisn't written was a mentre throughout the whole process. So we had a table ofcontents, then we hung in some ideas an example so had a really rich outline,and then I would just write iwould right right, right, right, right, right,right and Steve is right on my heels, like what about this story check outthis example check out click, this link and check out the story. We could leanon those statistics. What about this? What about that? How about we flipthose things, and it was this constant, give and take, but he had nothing toreact to until I was able to hack it all in some of it was good on the firstpass, not perfect, but good, and someone who was terrible. That's whythese gentlemen were showing their first videos to let you know that thefirst pass ain't. It there's no reason to expect it. It's going to be it andwhen you can have other people work with you on it, it's even better. Weturned in tried to turn in a seventy thousand word manuscript and our editorat Wiley, Richard Narmers, like sixtythousand words Max that was semetiting like going throughto rip out tenhousand words, but it's funny, if you remember Steve'spresentation yesterday talking about the sales process as well asphotography, you want to strip as much away as possible until the subject isseen as clearly in n. The exact context that you wantid to be in this book isway better for having ripped out those ten thousand words. Here's another one.Our design team is awesome at Bombom they're responsible for all thegorgeous franding. On this event, the event website they also avad Gretzingerdid the cover of the book, and this was the original illustration we put fortha proposal to try to get a publishing deal. We had the title relationshipsthrough video, and this was the illustration that went with it and on the call with our editor, he hadan assistant editor that he was on boarding a like late, twenty somethingyoung lady and her question relationships, trough video, this image, so thiis a book about online dating, and I like, okay back to the drawingboard. Literally, that's not what it's about so here was an interinversion ofthe cover graphic right, a little bit different. You notice some changesthere and t ultimately turned into this. You Dol notice. Three changes inparticular one that kind of Fussy, playbar and record button and playbutton detail, is now gone. It's much cleaner. In addition, the two peopleare now truly connected in conversation through a giant playbutton which evokesvideo and the relationship through video without saying it. Of course, wechange the title as well, and then third you'll notice that these peopleare clearly business people. The button is now a tie on the gentleman and theBlouse. Color is now a jacket collar on what is probably a woman or a man withsome really cool hair and and so together, with a revised title andsubtitle, you have a book, that's clearly a business book about videoright and so there's no reason to expect that the first thing we wouldput forth would be perfect right. So why do we do it to ourselves? Itdoesn't make any sense. We need to work these processes out. Here's one of thereasons why that happens. We get tied...

...up in all the things that are urgentand important, the things that are urgent and important. You have to doright now: Phone rings or text message, lights, up, client situation on firedeal with it immediately right, but we also have things that weredealing with that are urgent, but not so important, but we can maybe treatthem as if they are. We need to be very intentional about what we're doing andwhat we're not doing to create the space to start and try new things andto improve the things that we've already brought to life. So these arethe things that we might punt or better yet assign to somebody else to takecare of this is my favorite quadrant, not orgint, not important. Why are youdoing it or why are you doing it outside your leisure time? You need tobe real honest with yourself about what these things are and what you should bedoing and not doing, and then. Finally, no one was begging for a book. I hopeyou're glad that it's here, but no one was saying yeah I like the software. Ilike the training. I like the Webinar. I, like my support person mand. I can'twait to read a book about this right. Important though super important thisisgoing to be so good for the community and for the movement, but no one wasbegging for it's the same thing with like no one is begging for you, yournew Youtube playlist. Is it important to get it up there? It's superimportant to Karen car. That's why she got after and the results bring herback and back and back again to building out a youtube channel. Thesethings that you're sitting on you need to be really clear about yourself. Whatis truly important and make the time to make it happen. So a couple summarieson you can't edit what isn't written you have to start before you caniterate you're not going to be perfect the first time that should be obvious.One of the reasons we don't start is at it seems intimidating man,sixtythouzand word two hundred and fifty page book. I don't know about allthat. It's not a sixty Thousan word book. It wasn't a seventy thousand wordmanuscript. It was about twenty thirty five hundred word pieces, that bydesign come together and do a coherent Holeso. If you can take something thatlooks really big and hard and just kind of chip away at it, break it into fourpieces break it into eight pieces, break those eight pieces into eightmore pieces, all of a sudden becomes immediately manageable. This one I love.This is another thing that was echoed at the conference here, tell people andmake it public. So I knew I I knew this book needed to be written. I knew I wasgoing to do it, so I just started doing it between five and six in the morning.Those some mornings. Of course my wife's wondering what are you doing,and so I start talking to her about it. My wife, Magand who's, just so lovingand supportive and kind in all things, told me two important things. This issomething you can do, and this is something you should do. That wasreally encouraging to me and of course, as I started, spending the better partof a Saturday or Sunday writing. My son was wondering what was going on fifteenyear old son Owen, and when I told him what I was doing, he was super proudhe's like Buk Hmmean, author, it's really cool he's a reader he'ssuperjacked about it like that was motivating, and then you know, five,six, seven, eight thousand words, and I start talking to Steve about it andSteve. He got really excited really quickly. Don't know how many of youknow Steve Well, but when steee gets excited the eighteen people anywhere inarms reach or a ten foot pole are going to be Jack, so Steve Gets everywhereelse excited about it, so the executive team gets on board and we startharnessing the resources we're going to need to pull off this project at thescale and on the timeland that we wanted to. When you tell people and youmake it public you're going to get solicited and unsolicited supportpeople love to be a value in service. Just as you love to be a value inservice, and so the more you can tell people the more accountability and themore supportand momentum you're going to get along the way at some point inthis process the thing was just rolling downhill and it was just happening. Itwasn't really even an effort anymore. That's a lie was really freaking hard last one here make a deadline. So inthis dynamic, where you know something is important, but it is not urgent. OneWay to create some urgency is to make a deadline. That's it e make thedeadlineing? U Honor it. Our editor...

...said if you can give me a manuscript byThanksgiving. I will give you finished books by the end of April. How doesthat sound? We said that sounds amazing. We're doing our first ever live eventin Denver in May. It would be great to have it there, and so we honored thedeadline, and here we are again stack of books waiting for ye outside Capinlast one year, CAPP into the power of Yiet, Steve, never said to himself I'm not atAmazon, Barn's and noble, and eight hundred CEO read bestselling author. Hesaid I'm not a bestselling author, yet I didn't say I've never written a bookGosh. I I can't do that. I never written a book. I haven't written abook, yet this is simple growth mindset, stuff right. So, if you're saying I'mnot the kind of person who sends a video to my database, yeah right, it's that simple and youstart entertaining the possibilities you're in complete control. I know thisyoure ru of entrepreneurs you're in complete control of what you do andwhat you don't do, and everything that you want to make possible can be done. It just hasn't been done yet. Last one, you were a pioneer Denver Colorado where you are right now, founded in Ad Eighteden and fifty eightnamed after James W Denver. He was the territorial governor of the Kansasterritory. Interestingly, the Kansas territory is what is now Colorado andabout a decade after this town was founded, the population exploded. Itblew up from five thousand to thirty five tousand people in less than ayear's time. It is because there were rumors of gold and silver in the hillsand mountains west of here flashforward, a hundred and fifty years here we aretoday city of about three million people, median home price in the Metroarea, about four hundred K in the city, Single Hou, single family house, fivehundred Kmedian, though most of the golden silver has been mined. Oil andgas remain aerowspace and defense, software and technology travel andtourism. So many rich and vibrant industries operating in this city. AtTop. Twenty US city really dynamic place. Companies that are coastal arebuilding headquarters here, just to create that that ability to get backand forth and to build in a place that people want to be really reallyexciting place really nicely developed a lot more expensive than it was even adecade. o Go so in a room like this. If Youre one of those people it's kind ofjust getting going with video or started a little bit, but don't reallyhave any habits in a room like this on breaks and on stages and Yor Yourewatching speakers and talking to each other. It's really easy for you to feellike you were in Denver, may w thousand and nineteen and literally you are, butI'm not speaking literally right. Now, it's easy to feel like you were inDenver, may two thousand and nineteen in this video movement. But you are not. You are in Denver, Eightenden D,Seventy when the population exploded. When I started Bombom in two thousandand eleven we had a couple few hundred customers. Now we have fortyfivehousand in dozens of countries around the world and so that initialpopulation boom is begun, but do not make a mistake. You are a pioneer andthis is denver o eighteen. Seventy there are millions of people on the waybehind you and, as we look at the way, were doing video today, which is theattraction of gold and silver, it is going to become much more diverse, muchmore interesting, much more rich and you have all those opportunitiesavailable to you. So do not feel like you are behind this thing. This is justgetting going and this movement belongs to you. These are all awesome peoplewho orderd the book. They shared the book they're excited about the book. Ifyou, when you get your copy in the back, if you want to shoot and share itawesome at mention me at mention Steve at mention Bombam Hashhaggrey humanize.We want to celebrate you as a pioneer. We want you to help lead the way forother people. That is our responsibility for people who knowthere is a better way. We do not hoard it. We share it and we talk about it.This is your book.

These are some of the illustrationsagain ar the whole thing is a beautiful branded experience from cover coverthrough the Pagan section breaks to the illustrations: at'Sta reallik E, areally cool fun brand, O Exchangese are smart designs, that's Nancy and Ruby,and Michael and Steve and Ken just a handful of people who are illustratedin the book. I Hade that one day about ten twenty years from now, we look backat these, of course, is printed in black and white, so it already lendsitself to this kind of mentality, which is how I got there. You know how you goto a team park and you can get those tin time photos where you and yourfamily dress up with like a musket and some of these other things like Lik,real frontier type stuff. I hope we look back in ten or twenty years W enwe look at these illustrations and we look at the examples and we look atwhere we all were together in two thousand and nineteen and really feellike tin time photos like we've come so far and we will, but only if we do ittogether. This is your community. This is your book. This is your philosophy.This is your practice. You've been in this room, the past two and a half daysand felt like these are my people. These are your people. This is what wedo. This is how we work, and we do it together. Right, likeBombamb, is enabling this we give you software to do it. We create an eventlike this to bring it together, we publish stuff, we have a louder voicethan a lot of individual people in the room,just in the way that we work in the scope that we're workngon. So we helpfacilitate it. We curate it. We celebrate s choiies and all of that,but this is yours and you need to live with this. The worst thing that couldhappen here, Jason Just said it, the worst thing that could happen. Is Youbuy your ticket to Rehumaneze you get on a plane. You come to Denver, you geta hotel room. You hang out for two and a half days. You have a bunch of notes.You have Photi, saw a bunch of people shooting photos of the screen. You haveall this stuff and go home you're like man. That was awesome and you don't do anything you need tolive this. You need to send. The easiest thing you can do is pick twopeople out of social media out of your phone out of your database and just say,hi or I've been thinking about your how's it going or congratulations totimmy captaining the soccer team- and I do want to end with one caution here-is the paradox of vulnerability. We lean down a number of awesome authorsand researchers and thought leaders. One of them was Bernee browns. I'mgoing to use her definition of vulnerability, which is the feeling youexperience in times of risk, uncertainty and emotional exposure, risk, uncertainty and emotionalexposure. Think about all the best times in your life, the time you decided to open up yourown business and just do it or the time you got your first dealdone or when you proposed marriage or accepted a proposal for marriage, yorfound ot t you were pregnant or had your first child or you made the teamwhere you set a personal best all of the best moments in your life, onehundred percent risk uncertainty and emotional exposure. That's what our lives are. We put ournames on the front of a book and got the whole team behind it hours andhours from dozens of bombomb team members, thousands of dollars what, ifit flappd and my name's on the front of it or Steves names on the front of it,I get to at least share that burden right. WHAT IF NOBODY BUYS? It were worse,what if everybody buys it and they hate it? What if the ideas aren't very good?What, if they're, not that original what if they don't resonate with people?What, if nobody talks about it? What if no one leaves an Amazon ReviewSeriously, you should leave an Amoson erview. It's a big deal, andit be reallyhelpful. Have you had thoughts like this aboutsomething you you' thought about doing your been in the middle of, of courseyou have because all the best stuff comes when you unlock it. By being whoyou are and being comfortable in those...

...vulnerable moments. I know it sounds alittle bit soft but as it is in life, so it is in video Michael said it thismorning, many many other people said it today to Michael Says: I've gotthousands and thousands of dollars in video equipment. I built multiplestudios. I got these lights and all the stuff, but if you were to pry one pieceof equipment, fror my cold dead hand, because that'd be the only way youwould get it it's my iphone you've heard from other people on the stage Ido video here I do video there. I did this series did that series gotazillion views here. I got eighteen thousand subscribers here, but the videos that come through thebest are my simplest ones. When you strip away production, you strip awayall that text by the way dont some of these social networks look like theyrdesigned for people, learning English as a second language words flying allover the screen. Like you strip all that stuff away, you strip away theproduction, it's just you and the camera and the person that the video isfor so that you can be seen and heard andfelt and understood, and so that you esspecially in a oneer one context. Youcan let that other person in your life know whether they're excited orconcerned or confused or anxious or nervous or sad or whatever, they'refeeling that you can reach out and connect with them and say I see you, Ihear you, I feel you, I understand you and we ere in this together, becausethat is what all of this is about. So we wrote a book about it in a businesscontext. We created an event. You brought this event to life is anabsolute privilege to share this with you. We sincerely appreciate being here.We sincerely appreciate you. Helping carry this torch forward is up to allof us to let people know that thereis a better way, there's a better way to work, there's abetter way to live, and it's in connection with each other. Thank you. There is a better way to live in workif you're interested in pursuing it. You can learn more about the book atBombamcom Book. That's just the word bomb twice bomb Bombcom forrd book.There also links there for various places to order the book, if you'reinterested in doing that again, it's the complete what why who, when how andadvanced strategies of using simple personal videos to connect with yourcustomers more effectively and the connect with the people who matter mostto Your Business? If you have any questions about the book, The podcastthat presentation or anything else, I welcome your communication. Email meethen Etha, N, at Bombobcom. Thanks for listening, you are listening to the customerexperience podcast, no matter your role in delivering value and servingcustomers. You're intrusting, some of your most important and valuablemessages to faceless digital communication. You can do betterrehumonize. The experience by getting face to face through simple personalvideos, learn more and get started. Free at Bombomcom. You've beenlistening to the customer experience podcast to ensure that you never missan episode subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player or visitvombomcom. Thank you so much for listening until next time.

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