The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

25. Why Friction is a Customer Experience Killer w/ Brian Gilman

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Brian Gilman has decades of experience in product/service marketing. Right now, he’s the VP of Marketing at Vonage.

He was kind enough to come on the show to talk about how friction is killing companies, as well as how products and competitive intelligence relate to the customer experience.

Friction is the thing that is killing alot of companies today in terms of their customer experience, if you canremove that layer of friction through having better intelligence, moremachine learning to get from the appropriate a greaht customer to theappropriate agent Uin you're. Listening to the customerexperience podcast a podcast dedicated to helping today's growing businessesrestore a personal human touch throughout the customer Lice Cycle, getready to hearhow sales, marketing and customer success, experts surprise anddelight, and never lose sign of their customers. Humanity here is your hostbeef, an baute welcome back to the customer experiencepodcast. If you want to talk product marketing and service marketing andmore you're in for a treat here, we've got Brian Gilman, who has decades ofexperience in Product Marketing Service Marketing, go to market strategynationally and globally, with companies like Palicomanavia he's, currently theVP of product marketing at bondage, a position he's held for two years: BrianWelcome to the customer experience podcast Bekaver Havingman, lookingforward to it yeah me too, we'll start with you, where I start with everyonewhich is customer experience. What does it mean to you? What are itscharacteristics? How do you think about it? Yeah, where the Wwado we thinkabout customer experience here here advantage, I think, has been anevolution when you look at you know. You mentioned my previous lives, a Oviaand POLYCON. I think the customer experience is really changed. I thinkhistorically, customer experience was about. Let me flip out the number ofchannels with which my contact enter conserv, you ND. It was always a verybusiness driven experience and for a long time I think that that reallysatisfied the needs of most, but in the past several years you know, I thinkthat the market is really flipped on its head and customer experience now ismore about serving the customers needs in thechannel of their choice, and I think a lot of that is being driven by socialmedia. A lot of that is being driven by video a lot of these news tools andsolutions that customers have that they're communicating with themselveswhether that be college, kids, communicating with their parents- oryou know with my kids. My kids don't talk to each other on the phone anymore;they talk totheir friends over their xbox and so the expectation of how theywant to interact with one another is now carrying forward to the businessand the businesses who are evolving are suheeding, those that aren't ar fallingbehind. I love it. I think something relatively unique that the that you'veoffered here about it to dozens of people now is this very explicitly. Ithas been business driven what dis the business want to do. How does thebusiness want to dictate what the options are and customers have a lotmore power than they did before? They have a lot more choices than before,and so there's there's an evolutionary layer to it. What are just to follow upon that? What are some of the things that a for looking company might bedoing in order to accommodate the...

...customer to meet or exceed thoseexpectations that are now more important than ever? Yeah. Absolutelyso I think when we look at the leaders in customer experience today, you'relooking at companies like Amazon, I'm gonna, I'm probably gonna Goin to Kell.One of my answers for later in the PODCAST, but a company that I alwayslooke to is dominos. You Know Dominos is a historically a pizza company butthey're, not a pizza company anymore they're, a technology company thathappens to Bitrer pezas to people. I think that when you look at companiesand how they're having to evolve, you know the retailer. The average retailerisn't competing with the bootikue down the block anymore they're competingwith Amazon, the local Credit Union or Community Bank they're not competingagainst one another anymore, they're competing with Chase Bank of America,and these are companiess that are providing next generation, selfservicethe solutions to their customers, and so, if I'm not being dealt with in themeans that I want to be dealt with as a customer today, I'm going to go to theguy down the block and guy down the block once again, is only down avirtual block. It's it's not a literal block anymore and you're going to gowhere your needs are best served. So today the companies that are evolvingthat are looking at. How can we change where the conversation has takeng placebefore we started the podcast? Today we were talking about the fact that Idon't call my kids cell phones anymore, because Hiy know they're not going topick it up, but I know that within thirty seconds and me sending them atext message I'll get a response. The companies that are thinking throughthese challenges of where can we serve a customer better? How can we solve forfirst call resolution when a customer calls with a complaint? Sometimes thatmay be coming in over video and not having an audio conference at all? Itmay be solving their challenges. You know you think about to me. Customer experience always hasto have to do with context and experience without contact withoutcontaxt really is meaningless, because, while we're having at thecommunications level a very generic conversation between in some form ofcommunication, that form of communication is going to look verydifferent, whether it's a doctor to speaking opatien on a teacher steepspeaking to a student, a High Network Advisor speaking to their client, andso you have to look within the realm of what is the context with which thatbialogue is taking place. The companies that are really addressing thatChanlenge, first and foremost, are the ones that are going to succeed inTomorrows today's ind tomorrow's economy. Great, I heard in there a lotof idea a lot of really good and interesting ideas. The one I want todouble back on is this kind of Selfservice pieace. Just from yourperspective, an your experience can sell service, be truly personal, or isit just personalized talk a little bit about that relationship there. You knowpersonalized being I'm keat up with options based on my past behavior orwhatever personal being there's actually a human representative. On theother side, or a human touch of some kind talk a little bit about thatrelationship. Yeah I get. I got T ask a...

...lot about this question. I've been onpanels where they've asked you know when when will the robots take over,and I think that I think that, where we're at right now, Werewe're at apoint in time in terms of a technology evolution where AI and machine learningare really helping the self service experience where you can now have a botof some sort, interject between costomer and business and on certainlevels, there's a certain level of intellect with which that Bot can serveselfservice needs. I want to track a package. I want to cancel anappointment or set up an appointment. These are all things that could veryeasily be selfserved. The way I kind of look at it is you have your you, haveyour very easy transactional behavior and then you have kind of like thosemoments of truth. A customer buying a a couple lying a first home someonesettling in a state for for for a decease love, one more complexinteractions, which will then require a face to face interaction where I thinkthat you start to talk about self service, I think that AI and machinelearning can help direct the call so that you're not dealing with going fromagent one ageant, one going. Oh, you wanted an international flight. Let meput you over to sally over and International. Having to you know, Ithink you saw for a lot of the friction within the men in the communication,and I think friction is the thing that is killing a lot of companies today interms of their customer experience. If you can remove that layer of frictionthrough having better intelligence, more machine learning to get from theappropriate, a reght customer to the appropriate agent, you win. That'sgreat. I like tha the human examples you share there, where there is somelevel of empathy and comfort that a human can provide during a difficult orcomplex or potentially intimidating, experienceis great. So I've had a tonof sales professionals. Marketing People Customer Success Folks, someexecutives, I think you ere the first productmarketer, especially at at an executive level, to be on the show. So let's talkjust for a few minutes about product like what is the role of product in thecustomer experience to to someone that maybe isn't working in a softwarecompany or company that has a title like product marketing. What is productind? What is its role in the customer experience sure? Well, I am Te. I havethe worst named title kit coming into this podcast because- and this isactually something that I joked with my company CEO when I was interviewingwhen you look at the technoloogy today, an and most of this most of thistechnologies now sitting in the cloud product is kind of this antiquatedterminology. We don't have boxes anymore, that we're going to go dePloyon Pren. We have platforms, we have solutions, and so the way that I lookat how product starts to impact is one: how easily can I get it deployedwithin my network, but two an the CLA. The cloud brings with it. A lot ofbenefits like Apis, so ipis, take on...

...two forms, so vonage bought a companycalled Nexmo, which is our communications API platform, whichallows us to do embedded communications so think of your ober at think of orBNB, where you can embed communications into another form, whether be yourdesktop or or your mobile lap. But with that there's also more simpleApis, where now one platform can hook seamlessly into another platform, so ascompanies start to grow, they start to bring in you know, sales force or Zohoor sugar, crm or even g sweet, and you can now start to take your technologyor your products and Hook it into these other productivity platform, so forevery dollar that a companyis going to go and spend on a communicationsplatform like a vontage or one of our competitors, they're, probably spendingFivx tenx on these other productivity applications, which is all part of thiswhole digital transformation. Ano. Another term that we like to throwaround that everybody has a has a roll in somehow the product needs to workand interoperate in terms of impacting customer experience. What do I mean bythat? You have a company that that's dropped, five ts, what they're going tospend on their communications platform on sales force, a good, rigoroustraining, theyr implementing sale force appropriately. Their sales team isentering all their information, but every time they have to make a phonecall. The they're entering they're entering and all this information byhand manual from a product ivty perspective on the employee side,incredibly inefficient and then take that to the next level and inbound callcomes in forget the sales guy calling out to someone and having the ender inthat call. As now coming in- and I don't- I have to go- look up thatperson after they've come into my call it's highly effective. So how did yourproduct be able to seamlessly interact with all these other productivityapplications to drive a certain level of intelligent interactions with it?Where you know, within a business, one improves the employee productivity, butto create a better customer experience where they're no longer having tohaving Awkward Weight Times or having to be handed off from one agent to thenext, because that's all dealt with seemostly through the through theinteroperability of those two products and in that setup, of course, removingthe friction that you described before so you're a product marketer or atleast by Tisoluson market. It's just call it back. Okay, Sokay so reallyhard. So we'll go here too yeah. What are you know, one or two or threelaters or levels down? What is the datoday success metric around productmarketing? What are team members of yours doing daytoday, and what doessuccess look like in terms of marketing your solutions and your products yeah?So I hope I'm not an odd voll, an saying this, but every product markerthat I brought into my team there's been a couple of characteristics that Ispecifically look for, and part of this is edicated on some of my history androles that IV played in the past, where...

I need people who are technically Sadywho can handle the day today. Product Marketing, work with product management,work with sales work with sales enablement to make sure that asproducts are brought to market they're responsible for the go to marketactivities. Theyre working with the demand Gen teams to create robustmarketing to drive leave, you know top a funnel middale funnel bottom foll,okay, that's great, but the one characteristic that I've that I'vebegun. Looking for- and you know I've been very deliveretd about- is findingpeople who've had some level of vertical market, expr expertise. So mybackground, I started off my career and finance and when I first started intomarketing you brought up poly Com earler. It was to lead a solutions.Marketing function, which was you know, help us not sell boxes anymore, becauseboxes were killing the video conferencing market. We would go andsell a company six boxes so that Joe CEO didn't have to travel from New Yorkto London. Tehong Kong we'd go back six months later and say: Let's Stoll, ouse,six more boxes and they'd said Nope fore good. What it didn't work, notwork flawlessly picture quality s fantastic. The boxes are being used,five percent of the time when I don't have to travel, it became an issue of that solution cell. We didn't reallyunderstand what their needs were, whether that be interviewing andrecruitment distance learning. If it was a doctor how d your doctors look atthings like tell em medicine, not only within the walls of their network orthe university, but we had one of our one of our Prima customers wasdelivering telehealth services to oil. Riks in the Gulf of Mexico person getsinjured. They posste cost that company forty sanddollars to Metovac them off.Of that off that platform yeah the building not O, see face to face to adoctor. You know solving for bigger challenges which drives adoption andutilization, and adoption and utilization is a thing that will killanybody in the cloud today. I can go and buy all of your solutions today, ifI don't use them, you're very easily, replaced because you're in the cloudI'm not making a massive patbacks investment in your product, which kindof pies me into a you know five year ammoratization before I can rip you out.So to me it's you know. Bringing people o have some form of vertical expertiseas well and as this company and as we are, transforming our business. My teamcan evolve with the business to say that going back to experience withoutcontext is meaningtless we're going to bring a product to market, but we'regoing to tell you. How does that work for a doctor trying to help a patientthroughout the patient pathway, not just fren the time the patient getsinto the doctor's office, but in terms of postcare treatment, whether that bemy company's ability to send sstoe to a patient whoseprescription s? I needs tobe refilled well after they've ever left the doctor's office, because, as adoctor, I want to make sure that I'm you're no longer being readmitted intothe hospital, so I'm going to start getting penalite by insurance companies.These are things that we need to start to think through and all of thoseworkflows are different, albeit from...

...once again that generic communicationslevel they look the same. So I always look for that added level of expertiseto that way. As we get smarter and we work more with sales yeah, they need toknow the products, but knowing that when they go to speak to a credit unionthat they can't use the word customer because credit unions have membersreally important things that let them know that we're a trusted advisor. Weunderstand their business and we're going to be able to sell a more robustportfolio to them. I May I guess so many places I could go with this. Athat's such a great passage. I want to get into the the multiple productPortfolos, you know, younew already mentiond Nexmo, and how you how you andyour team manage that, but I want to stay right here, where you just were,which is their subtleties nuances, product base solution, based that thesales folks need to know about, so that they can really speak in a meaningfulway to prospects and customers. What does that look like for you all? Howare you, how are you communicating this? Are you doing? How are you getting thisinformation to sales people sure, so I'm goingto deviate a little bit. I'mactually going Ao answer your first part of your question, which was themultiple product line. So one of the challenges that that we've had hereadvantages were a company WHO's grown through acquisition, a lot ofacquisition we bought next Mo. In the past year, we bought talkbox, which wasa video API platform which we've now tied into to fill out our APIcapabilities. We bought new voice media, a contact center company, so we nowhave these three legs of this school. You Know Youby Communications, contactcenter and Hen, your communications, if Youi Platform, I'm going to bring thisback to rel an is into an answern N in one second, but you. What you've nowdone from a sales perspective is you've taken three different sales forces,three different types of buyers who would normally come to us you're, goingto have your your oobers and lits, or your digital natives whou want to buildtheir next eration capability know their mobile afh. They don't reallyhave a need to transform their contact center or their UC platform. Today youhave your company WHO's, looking at uprating from their on Prent PBX into acloud base, unifyed communications platform, and then you have yourcontaxt center company. You got dusiness all different personas. Theyall have different needs. It's a very challenging environment for sales, toone get their arms around everything. Oh and you have to know the verticalmarkets as well. Well, what I'm not trying to do is verticalize ourbusiness and what do wi mean by that? Where we're going and creating veryspecific vertical solutions, that gets to be you get into a lot of rat holeswhen you get into certain vertical markets where you have to deal withregulatory and compliance issues, you have to go and get certified fordifferent things, and there are things that we are attacking. We just announcehigh trust certification in the healthcare space. There are certaintable, staks that you have to have, but my verticalization perspective we'renot trying to do that today. But what we're trying to do is to show customersthat, if they lost opportunity, especially as a marketer for me to justgo and create a demandgion campaign...

...against our UC capabilities or ourcontact in or capabilities or if Youli capabilities, because I'm going to hitthis this universe of customers and twothirds of them may not be interested in what I just sold them because o what Iwas trying to sell them, because, while I'm seling in the UC campaign, they maybe interest in contact center. They may be n interested in Apis. That's where Ithink verticals come come into play, because I can now tell this entirestory of a patient pathway. I can talk about from the moment that they comeinto the health care network. All the way through do to the Tina that they'redischarged same thing with with finance with retail. The stories are muchbigger and more relatable. When you start to talk about the customerexperience and if I can go into a customer and say yes, we can sell youthis today. But how do you thought about? The point is not to go and getthe entire to swallow. The Wall today, because you're never going to get acompany or the dedicated budget today to go, buy everything that you'retrying to sell them, but one you're, giving them a pathway to something thatis going to be more advanced to you're, telling them that there are very fewcompanies who, in the space who can tackle all three of these things andthen through your future proofing their business and you may open up anopportunity for them to say I didn't know about you in the contact centerspace or Oh, I didn't even think about API, as I you know, yeah. Of course Iuse Uber, but wh t. How does that impact me were storytellers at the endof the day as marketers and wherever there's an opportunity? We need to bestorytelling, and so we need to be robust about what we're talking about.We need to be specific about the target audience with which our campaign maymaybe focused on, but we need to open eye balls up to a greater universe andwe need to use real ef ks studies. We need to use a better narrative around avertical market application and I think that's really the challenge that wehave, because we are threating a needle, sometimes where you're trying to do alot around a lot of different products and telling a very pincise story. Butwhen you can, when you can tell these great stories around these moments oftruth, that I talked about for bringing emotion into a play and emotion is avery good motivator for people to go and by yeah the other thing there too,that's kind of baked in is you know I'm going to bring you in on this, but wehave all these other solutions and once we're trusted partner, we can go aheadand proceed as appropriate over the coming months and years where we canhelp future proof, your business os one. Second, sorry, it's difficult because you knowhistorically, vonage is known as a residential loice Company and so a lotof times we're not even brought to the table for all three of these things,and so we're overcoming the hurdle of being a betb business company, wherethe overwhelming majority of a revenue is coming from. But nobody knows it,and so you have to open up some of these doors because one people think ofyou as a residential wave company and if they thinkit you as a BTB company,they think of you as a micro BTB company is you know, residential plusalmost, and so you have to open up these stories that people think of youin that van that's great. So, let's go...

...back then to where we, where we wentdown the the multiple product pathway and again, how do you communicate this,and I aske this because it's a challenge for us. You know from asoftware development, a product, development management, marketing, evencs in the feedback loop into sales, like communication at at really highlevel. The communication between teams is so critical so that you know a salesrap who might be the second or third touch of anything, that's beingcommunicated outward to the prospect in customer base. You know they obviouslyneed to be informed, an to manage expectations and to see all theseopportunities, for example, that you offered with the three legs of thestool. What are some basic? Tactically? What are some mechanisms or tools thatyou all are using successfully to make sure that your sales people are awareof these opportunities in the state of affairs and where things are going andwhat they can say and chance, they should they shouldn't, say, etcetera.Well, so I'll take this from an organizational perspective and I'lltake his from more tool, training tactics so because of the differentbierpersonasm because of the the very different custom journeys in which fromwhich they would come to a company like vonage we've separated our business ins,what we call our API group and our applications group, so the API group,as more of that developer, led journey of digital natives who want to go andplay with APIS and build their next generation communication schools, andthen we built out our applications group and our applications group is thecontact center and UNIFIE communications portfolios. The reasonwe broke it out that way is we're seeing a massive acceleration nowin terms of how people are buying both contact center and unify communications.It used to be back in the day when it would be rare that you would see acompany go and by joint it seats. The cloud is driving some of this nowthrough our acquisition having all all of thes technology under one roof we'reseeing now. You know one and two deals now looking at joint sead opportunitiesbetween YOUC and contact center, so cross training, the sales teams for UCand CC clearly in a space where we have to be at the forefront of that, becauset in the terms that been diagram a while ago, they were just kind oftouching we're now seeing like this, so that crosell training has to take place.But it's not a huge leap for a sales guy to have that you that type thatunify communications and contact center discussion, because a lot of times arealmost incepparable and if they're, only having a UC conversation, they'restalting the conversation. Well, how do you intigrate within my existingcontact, ener so they're having a lot of those discussions anyway? Tacticallynow, what we've done is Wa sales enavlement perspective. You Know We'veimplemented CCS training, which is you know, is as solution sellingmethodology with which all of our sales...

...guys are getting trained is to ask thequestions it's to go in without your pitch deck, but to have you know thosevery specific conversations to their business, to have of them really goodunderstanding of what their challenges are before they go in, and you knowundersell themselves from a you know. It's on the marketing team, then tomake sure that we have competitive intelligence pretty well sinched up,because we're going to be running into a much larger multitude of competitorswhere, if you're dealing with two different industries, instead of one,how do we get our guys comfortable with our UC competitors, as well as ourcontext, an our competetters, oh and by the way, there's a whole Slo of net newcompetitors that are coming down. Th coming down the PLAT and you know everyday, so it's making sure that those tools are available. It's making surethat, as we bring new campaigns to market that were training, the salesteams to let them know that we're training our bdrs for inbound leads, ifwe're doing outbound dialing, that it's my team, that's sitting down with thoseteams and giving them the verbige and the scripting that they need to havethose up front conversations. It's a it's a lot of work, but you know, as Isaid when, when you boil it down into those two groups as opposed to tryingto to do it all under one one umbrella. It makes it a little more manageablefor people to understand and yeah. Every group is trained up to have havethose questions asked, but you know if, if all of a sudden there's a big APIlead that comes in through a UC deal, we make sure that we're bringing in theright people on those theses or other sales teams from the other side of thehouse, whether Regald tess O, which side it comes from to make sure thatwe're covered. That's great, is really helpful. You know it's so fun. Talkingwith someone like you, who's got a great deal of experience in a muchlarger organization, because you know you've already walked through a lot ofthe things that were trying to figure out it's one of the reasons I'm soexcited to do the showand to have guests like you wan, it's reallyhelpful and interesting. So thank you for for that pass. That was reallygreat. You actually touched on something I wanted to ask about, whichis competitive, intelligence and market intelligence is something you have agreat deal of experience, and you know what's its primary role, is it and howis it structured in the organization? Is this just something that happens aspart of the processor? You have people dedicated on these tasks and then andthen you find ways to roll it into other communication throughout theorganization. What what is competitive or market intelligence that look likeas a function inside an organization like yours in every company that I'vebeen at this is probably been wonl want to be more difficult challenges. We'vehad to go and solve because no matter how much competitiveintelligence you do, your sales teams will never be happy with how muchcompetitive intelligence you've done. You're going to give me competitiveintelligence on our afim competitors, they want twelve, you do twelve, theywant twenty. So due to limitations, I don't have. I don't have a never endingbudget. I don't have teams of people within the Product MarketingOrganization. We have finite resources...

...to go and do everything that we'resaying, and so we've done a couple things. One is:We've agreed upon with sales leadership, the core competitors that we are goingto go and build out battle cards and and scripting against, and we said thatwe would keep it at. You know, depending on the competitor, a certainkidence of updates. That is something manageable that I can give me up in andamongst my team, myself included, I own competitive intelligence. I own certaincompetitors that I keep an eye on as well, because it's all hands on deckwhen you have a market, that's moving as fast as ours is: We've also gone anddeployed a competitive intelligence platform. So it's something for us togo and manage in terms of doing a lot of the heavy lifting and putting ininformation, but there are things that we can automatically set, so I can putpage links into the platform and any time there's a change on a Comon, acompetitors, pricing page I'll, get an alert, and it may be be, maybe thatthey just change some of the words, but it maybe that they had a whole wholesale change of their how they priced out their pladform things that give usbetter intelligence. That way, we can be ae a bit more drive a bit ob fasterspeech, O market than we would otherwise, because quarterly every sixmonths Dou would think that quarterly would be enough. But it's not in thismarket and so anytime, that you miss something you're always going to getcalled on it. So bringing some level of automation into CI has been a big helpfor us and also having an ear to the marketfor those next competitors. As I said, this market is moving very aggressively.There are large companies, everyone wants to share the deskpop, and sowhether it's a crm company, that's looking to move into the contact centeror it's you know everyone's always looking to have phone as well as aswell as the productivity APPs. It's going to shows waling the floor meetingwith analysts talking toth people that you may never have a conversation within your life again because they work at a competitor. But you hide your badgeNice enough that they're wolling to talk. It's anything that you can getjust to make sure that things don't slip, no matter how much you do. Youlalways miss things, but as long as you know, there's an agreement and at setupon course for how you're going to do with ci you you'll at least win morebattles. Tand you'll lose with yourself teams. It's great I'm going to go backa little bit to video, but maybe to the softer side of it. You know you. Yougave that great example of any. I think you were video at the time right, O forsixers, and then I video for twoyeah. I so that the ' thing is specifically the story you just sharedof a metavac being forty grand to get the person off the oil rig versus tellahealth. You know video conferencing, so there's the obvious practical side ofit. But can you speak to like the human side of it like? What is the? Why is video going forward such avaluable part of customer contact and Customer Communication? Not just frmanefficiency. Standpoint like I can put...

...my face in front of anyone anywhereanytime as long as we both have an Internet connection and a device whichevery device is a video device at this point, but talk a little bit to the tothe human side of that as well yeah. So I think that video does a lot in terms of the emotionalamusing, emotional losely, but the emotional side of of a customerexperience interaction. You know we brought up a the tele medicine. Webrought up. You know the docor patient, but Ttak a contacts on our agent who'shaving to deal with volumes of calls that person could be sitting within afinancial institution, and I can be Kay I'll give an example from Y proma.Actually for when I was at video, you know one of the Talentis Hat, that acredit union that I used to work with had was was a small credit union. Ithink it was like forty ish fts. They had period pike periods of traffic intheir branches and woul happened. A lot of times is, you would go into thebranch you would go and speak to the person behind the desk, who maybe ayour or two out of college. You know the Guy Voes, your with tralls out ofyour account you'd, ask Moe question about a mortgage or whatever, and theywould hand you off to a hne eight hundred number, because they didn'thave all the answers they weren't a specialist and whatever you were askinga very cold experience. You get ragted through a diler and what this creditunion said was you know every opportunity that that person leaves ourbranch to go and call a one. Eight hundred number is a lost opportunity,because they're probably equally, is like theye going to go called chase orback of America or whoever down the street, so they started putting invideo keyoks within the branch you have now the face to face interaction andthere's proven studies about the effectiveness of having a Faseto face.Interaction in terms of close rates from you know how much it drops from Omin person to video to voice being the least common denominator, so you'regetting the emotional freedback. So whether or not really upset with you,because it's something you just said whether I'm happy, I can gauge thatinteraction a little bit more so you're getting these physical neuants of theconversation that yeah we can somewhat derive out of out of an audio call, butI can physically see it over video and Thtese are more on the basicinteraction side. You know when you're now dealing with the ability to takevideo and expand that into the fields of like field services, where myInternet's down you're going to try and deplay a truck to me a week from now.Well, if you take your phone and the camera on the back of it, let's go lookat the back of your roder. Oh that wires out of place. You fix to yoursolving for issues that are causing me emotional distress and when you have anamount of kids that I have in my house, the Internet being down is an emotionaldistress. So it's you know. How are you solving for my issues and that face tofase interaction or sometimes the ability to show what I'mu? What wbut? Ican't verbalize to you, because I'm not technical, and I don't know what wiresare coming in and out of my router and yet you know sending a guy a week fromnow isn't going to solve my problem. These are the emotional connectionsthat we see a lot with video, and I...

...still think that the more extreme tatextreme usecases, but beyond face to face interaction are still in theirinfantcy. You know you look at Tela Medicine Tell Hem. Medicine is reallystarting to take form now, and I think, is being driven now from outsidefactors outside of the medical community. Primarily insuranceinsurance is now going to reimburse for telling that tell hem medicineengugements. They are now going to penalize doctors for readmittance backin the hospitals of patients. So if I'm a doctor- and I can get on face to facewith you to check in on your diabetes, Perto call- you know several monthsafter you've left, it left the hospital, and I can check in on how your diet is.These are things that are now going to solve for challenge as well, above andbeyond, just being a phone replacement. Because, honestly, if we weren't overvideo right now, we would pick up the phone, and we would do this over our.We would do this over audio. The experience wouldn't be as good, but wewould solve for the majority of what most podcasts look like today, so it'ssolving for the needs, O bub and beyond replacement of a phone. That's wherevideo is filling the void, and I think that the faster we get their customerexperience will start to really shift fleets and balance. It's fantastic,because you went straight to where I spend almost all my time, thinking andworking and teaching around video, which is largely unscripted, unproduced,unrehearse, just true person to person communication with a little bit of showand tell Mixedin as well as necessary. So good, hey relationships are ournumber one core value at Bombam and here on the podcast. So I always liketo give you and thank you again so much for your time and your insights. It'sbeen awesome. I like to give you the chance to thank or mention someonewho's had a positive impact on your life for your career and to give amention to a company. That's doing customer experience really really well,so I had fad that I've had a little bit of time. To think about this. I thinkthat one person in my career that I would think actually goes way back tomy first job in marketing when I was at a via woman by the name of Sophia,William. She was the the vice president of marketing that I reported up intoshe's the first person who beated into my head this concept of big UNmarketing and that marketing is not just a LEGEN team, they're ot, the oneswho just build battle cards and data sheets, but marketing has a state atthe sales table. Marketing has a seat at the finance table. Marketing has aseat at all tables ind, while they may not be beleed the lead voice at thosetables. You know to always have that optic of you know. Marketing is is asclose to the customer as Sall, sometimes sometimes more so they'redefinitively closer to to the street than product is and finance, and soit's always been help helping my career in in orienting myself to that north.Star of you know, are you thinking, big and broad enough about how marketingplays in this world in terms of companies that are doing customerexperience? Well, I'm spoiled because I get to watch net. NEW COMPANIES COMEINTO MARKET WITH VERY COOL LL...

...applications every day through our nextMOA pis. I look at companies like Oober and dominoes, and I got kind of see yes,there's a lot of failed ways to go and order a pizza, but you know every otherday. It feels like you're watching wotheir dominos commercial, and it'slike I would never order apeat to that way, but but I'm inspired by by theaggressiveness of with which they want to sell me pizza e h. You know it'ssomething that you know in conterms of companies that are pushing the limitsin terms of companies that are, I think, really kind of pushing how far customerexperience can go. Those are the ones that I always look to, and you know whowould have thought a Maor three years ago that you'd look to a pizza companyas where you're going to draw your technology inspiration from it's a when you look at to really simplethings that we used to do without thinking about it, helling, a cab andordering a pizza, and how far that's really changed. I really I'm inspiredby those types of companies every day it's outstanding. This has been anabsolute pleasure. I love everything that you brought. I know folks aregoing to find it valuable if someone wants to follow up with you or withvonage what are some ways that they can connect with you or the company. Briansure me personally, you can follow me on Linkton. You can follow me ontwitter. I believe my handlas be Giln in thirteen one. L People always mightmiss that if they wanted to get in touch with vontage, they could reach usat Bonagecom and if they wanted to learn more about Ou Apis, they ca go toNex mocom that you reachd, that through Vonagecom as well, but a lot ofdevelopers like going straight to the neckt o the website. I love it. What Ilearned about Nexmo is was one of many many really interesting things here. Ifyou enjoyed this conversation- and you want more like it, you can alwayssubscribe to the customer experience podcast. You can find it at Bombomcom.I tunes Bombombcom, H, spotify Bombomcom podcast, where everywherethat you would want to listen to a podcast Brian Gilman with vonage. Thankyou so much for your time today. Hi'll give a great afternoon thank for havingme. I appreciate it. Thank you. You are listening to the customerexperience podcast, no matter your role in delivering value and servingcustomers. You're intrusting, some of your most important and valuablemessages to faceless digital communication. You can do betterrehumonize. The experience by getting face to face through simple personalvideos, learn more and get started. Free at Bombomcom you've been listeningto the customer experience podcast to ensure that you never miss an episodesubscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player or visit vom bomcom.Thank you so much for listening until next time.

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