The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

28. No, Your Customer Isn't Always Right w/ Jaime Casap

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Today’s guest is Jaime Casap, Chief Education Evangelist at Google

Jaime helped launch G-Suite and other applications in schools, and he sincerely believes that education can disrupt poverty and transform lives.

In this episode, Jaime talks about what Google’s doing that didn’t seem possible five years ago, why he thinks the customer is always wrong, why “What do you want to be when you grow up?” is the wrong question, and how companies should prepare for the arrival of Generation Z.

If you think about Gmai Gmail was aSALV Disha, you know email s, a solg problem. No, it wasn't right UNSO. Whatwe found were the problems in thet. We didn't ask customers, Hey. Do you wanta new email platform right? The chromebook was solving a problem. So soit's about identifying a problem, and sometimes your customer doesn't knowwhat the promise doesn't Ean. You shouldn't ask him: doesn't EU Shourdn'ttalk to him? I'm just saying that you got to go beyond that. The single most important thing you cando today is to create and deliver a better experience for your customers,learn how sales marketing and customer success experts create internalalignment, achieve desired outcomes and exceed customer expectations in apersonal and human way. This is the customer experience podcast. Here'syour host, ethen Beaute, Hey. I am so glad you're with us onthis episode of the Customer Experience Podcast. I know you're going to be gladyou're here too today, we're talking about education, technology, innovation,generation, Z and a whole lot more. Today's guests spent several years atExcentur and Charles Schwab before joining Google. Where he's been formore than a dozen years now, as the education evangelist, he helps launchGE, sweetend, Google aps into schools and universities. He believes thateducation and technology can disrupt poverty and transform lives. Jamiecassep welcome to the customer experience podcast. Thank you very much.That's one of the best introductions. I've ever heard that great, I you knowso we're all in the right place, so good, hey. I have a bunch of questionsthat I know you're going to enjoy thinking about and talking about, butI'm going to start here where I start with every guest, which is yourthoughts or your definition or characteristics. When I say customerexperience what comes to mind to you yeah, I think it's funny that youmentioned that because I just had one of these. It's a delight. It's it'slike your. You feel great about the interaction right, so this idea ofhaving this interaction- and I don't know if I can show the story you canedit this out- maybe if it's not appropriate, but I had one of theseinteractions with polar pro. You know, as you know, I'm shooting these youtubevideos and I bought these filters and I lost one of the caps for these reallynice filters, and so I emailed polar p pro-- and I said, Hey- I lost you know.Where can I order another one? I need another cat for my for my nd filter andI'. Like Hey, we got a bunch of me office. Don't worry about. It will justsend you one right. No, no churchwosshipbeing, Kno. Nothing likethat kind of experience is how I define really good customer experience. It'sthis idea of having a positive experience and they send me one andit's great, and you know- and I couldn't be more delighted and I get toshare tholl stories right and that's the whole point of having a goodcustomer experiencis that you get to share those stories with other peopleyeah. So it's there. I hear kind of two themes. One is kind of thisfrictionless thing like. Oh, that was easier than I expected and then two isthat I have a friend or an advocate over there. They just happen to sellfilters and other related products, but it's this we're in this with you. It'sa relationship so good, so you've so much great content available online. Soif anyone wants to see keynotes or a tedx talk or Jamie's youtube channel,just Google Jamie Cass of Ja, IME CA S AP we might get into some of thosethems. I highly recommend any of the key notes that said that several thepeople he spoken for Hav put up there. So we may not get deep into thosethemes, but I do want to start with this kind of competitive landscapesituation. What are you in Google doing in education that a kind of frustratesMicrosoft and apple and B was maybe thought not to be able to be done, butfive years ago, like you guys can't do that like? What are you doing so forfolks who are listening just some context like what are you doing in theeducation space with Google yeah, and this is going to part of this- is goingto sound like a corny answer or some...

...kind of corporate answer. But it'sabsolutely true. I've been O go over thirteen years and I have no idea whatapple and Microsoft are doing. I could I don't care what they're doing? That'snot what I focus on, and this is a sounds like one of those answers, butit's absolutely true. All I care about are my users right. All I care aboutare the users that are using out our tools and being able to provide themthe best experience and also to be able to take their ideas and take theexperiences that they're having and used that to build whatever. Is thatwe're building? So that's the mindset that we have hat's the mindset, my teamhas and look microsolt products are great apple products are great aveand.You know I have an IPAD. I have lots of different types of tools, that's aboutfinding the right too, for the right job, but what we focus on is being ableto provide our users and that's always a bad word in the technology sfake, ourcustomers, if you will the best experience that they can have, and sowhen we launched Google AP for education, it was this first. It wasthis tool for universities, because lots of people and lots of universitiesWeren' giving their customers their students a goodexperience, and this is away for them for the universities to give them agood experience, and so that's why Google APS that we not drove call youknot. Called g sweet took off and did really well, but the thing I think thatpeople thought we would never be able to do. Illin is with the the release ofchromebooks right th. I think people ha thought that chrome books, weren'tgoing to be very successful or people would say, hey what are you doing? Idon't understand what why R you getting into this and again, if you think aboutwhat a chromebook can do in education, it has two really good benefits numberone is it gives the individual good experience right? They boot up in acouple seconds, they're, OPF and running the battery last all day. Youknow you have a simple experience is great, but the real benefit is for theadministrators, and I used to have this joke that when I did these chromebookpresentations, I used to say the day I dread the most out of any day of theyear. The day I wish I could work is December, twenty fifth and you get thatpuzzle. Look as to December twenty. Fifth, I'm like yes, because that's theday my inlaws get their new technology that I not have to implement and if two college educated people can't dothis can't implement technology. What is it like for an organization as athousand people, ten thosand people hundred thousand people and what theCromebook was able to do for those customers is be able to give them thetools that they needed to be able to launch a large number of devices andmanage those devices, and I think that's why the crome books have beensuccessful, and so I think that we are in the education space, because webuild really cool tools and we have really cool platforms that can be usedin education and that's what we're doing so hin the two layers. There, youhave this studentsas customers and you already listed a few very specificbenefits of the chrome book there. But then, of course, the decision maker orthe buyer in this scenario is the administrator and so you're providingeasy implementation and backend reporting and these kinds of things forthem, yeah. No, it's more about like so when a student takes that cromebookthat that administrator can control that chromebook an this determine whatwebsites that student can see. There's no chance of viruses getting on thesedevices, so so h, n, when they, when you do a take home program, for example,one to one take your machines home you're, not worried about all theseother machines coming back and dropping a bunch of viruses and bugs into yoursystem, because you've basically extended the CO the school system towherever those students are because, when they're using that device, it'slike they're using them at school, it's not like the even if they connect youtheir home network, they're, still going through this through the setupthat you have for them. So it's you're still responsible for love it going tothe...

...going back to the you know. Let's say acouple college: Educated Parents Bi bet they wishe. They had this ease ofimplementation, just the children's own devices before we get into a wide rangeof stuff because we're a very interesting and expressive person.Let's stay on. Let's stay on this, this evangelist roll with Google a littlebit. I did a chief e angelast series for another podcast with Evangelis fromapple and Amazon and insihe and terminous for you. What is the role ofan evangelist just just gives a quick ones over here. How did you findyourself in it? What are the benefits to Google and what might someone who'slistening to this? You know a salesperson or a marketer or a leaderlike what are maybe some signs that they might need or want a similar rolein their organization. Yeah, no, so think's a great question, because thisis not something that I set out to do. This is not a job that I wanted. Itjust kind of turned into one, and I think that's part of it too. Is thisorganic growth, and for me I actually was listed. You know I listed myselfwhen we launched Google ast for education. I was working withuniversities and I was working with Kay twelve institutions. I was likeeducation manager, a Google or something like that right. Our team wasvery small. We started out with two people, you know at this point. We havelike three or four people, and I actually went and did a presentation inMichigan and the executive for technology for the State of Michiganwas in this presentation and he came up to me after my presentation he's likeyou're. Not I don't know what your title is, but you're, not whatever yourtitle is. You are an evangelist right. You are bringing good news and I'm likeOh okay, and so it kind of stuck- and I kind of grew from that and, as youmentioned in the technology space, there's lots of these avangelest roles.But for me I think idimade a decision ten years ago, where I didn't want tobe a sales person and there's nothing wrong with being a salesperson. I justthink there's a place in time. For that. I wanted to have a point of view. Iwanted to have a perspective, so I can get up on stage and talk abouttechnology and education and generations in the future work and hasnothing to do with. Google has to do with these ideas in these concepts. Ibelieve, obviously, that google builds the best tools or I wouldn't be workingthere, and so I think that's the tiing and so an evangelist isn't about nobeing a salespitch person for your products and services. An evangelist isthere to bring good news to people and for me, n the can us, like one of thethings that I say in my presentation, because people in education hear thisall the time they hear this idea that education is broken, that it doesn'twork, which is a funny concept, considering that we built the superpower of a nation on the back of the education system that we built in thiscountry right and by the way, it's also work for millions and millions andmillions and millions of people- and I get and has it worked for everyone.Absolutely not. But it's a different conversation to say: Hey Education isbroken everything you do sucks and you should go away. Compare that to look.What we need to do is bring education to the next level. Educations been verysuccessful for the last hundred and fifty years now we need to look at thefuture and ask ourselves and do what our forefathes and education did andask ourselves. What's the right education system for the future that weface, so I becomes a calling rather than a defensive mechanism that peopletend to. I get it. You spend your whole life ind career, working in a space andsomeone comes in from the outside and tells you that you're terrible. It's aso. I think it's the approach right. So to me. I always im part of the way Ithink you you talked about my youtube. Videos is to have a differentperspective, to have a different point of view that doesn't necessarily fallin line with the conventional wisdom and to be an advocate, even ifsometimes it's against what your company's doing or against the policyor an idea. So it's sticking to those...

...principles and having a perspective, ina point of view, I love the constructive approach there of you know.There is a better way to do this than that's all broken right. There'snothing constructive about! That's all broken, in addition to it being just agross exaggeration Ur. You flip another question on its head, so I just wantyour thoughts or feedback on this. So in one of your presentations, you offer.What do you want to be when you grow up as the wrong question, yeah and flip itand say what problem do you want to solve and offer that as a betterquestion and for me as someone who gos shit's been several years since Ifinished a master's degree, which was several years after an undergraduatebachelor's degree and which was you know, four years after a high schooleducation for me that s superresonated? For me within my own job- and I knowthe folks listening will kind of like this contrast to speak a little bit tohow you arrived at this thought and how how you talk about it yeah and again.This is using the same kind of model, which is you know. I talk to students.I ask students, Hey how many of you have been asked, what you want to bewhen you grow up and every single hand goes up and what I say to my audienceis. It was a great question again. It was avery good question for a very long time when we have like a hundred jobs whenjobs youre pretty stable, when you could do an assessment in fourth gradeabout what you were going to do in a future and mine was an irs agent, wehad jobs that were pretty stable. Change happened much slower back thenthat course you made sense. Now we need to come up with a new question giventhe fit given what we face. sixt five percent of the jobs o the future don'texist today. Jobs are castly shipping and changing much faster than everbefore. I'm working for a company that then exist twenty years ago right. So the better question is or the newquestion. If you will is what problem do you want to solve? What's theproblem that spins in your head and by the way, there's a other part to that,which is how do you want to solve that problem? How do you want to take theskills and the passions t of what you have to solve that problem, becausethere's ten thousand ways to solve a problem which your angle on it? What'syour perspective? What's your point of view on solving that problem, becauseif you, if I was a student- and you said- and I said to you hey I want to-I want to SALV climate change, your first instinct does an adult might beto come to me and say: Hey, you need to be a scientist. Youneed t go studyscience, but if I'm a videographer, if I'm a film producer, I am someone wholikes to take photographs. The way I might solve that problem is to godocument, climate Changeer, to go, educate, other people about climatesand there's lots of ways to solve a problem. So what probl you want to sop?How do you want to solve it, and then you can start thinking about what doyou need to learn? What are the knowledge, the skills and youbilities?You need to have the solve that problem, and how can you start building thoseknowledge, skills and abilities? And I think this is where it comes in, wheretoday you have the whole world at your fingertips right you that that's! Thegood news is that you can learn anything today at as speed andit'snever been possible. Before what classes can you take online offline?What at Mi t at Stanford at Harvard what you know who's solving thatproblem today, and how do you connect with them? What I have a student reachout to me a couple of days ago and she's like Hey, I want to solve theeducation problem. Here's my angle on it, love to talk to you. AbsoluteyLES's set up a cals I'll talk to you right so so there is so many differentways to think about this. But it's basically based on D, I'm sure you'veread Daniel pinks book drive right about what motivates all of us. IsHuman Beings? It's the same three things purpose. What Problem d you wantto solve autonomy? How do you want to solve it and mastery? What do you needto learn to solve that problem? That's where the whole package comes from sogood. I love that translation of the book I haven't. You know they resonatewith you and if anyone has not read the book, it's a highly recommended read orthere's a really nice animated video.

That's a twelve minute introduction tothe core concepts of it. I haven't. I didn't make that connection so easily.I love what you did with that. The customer is always wrong. Do you have any thought this SARS Arimoving out to a new idea, new tapic Heer, the customers always wrong wwttalk about that yeah. So so I this idea that the you know this old again oldmottel about the customers always right. I always found that as fascinating. Ialways found that that idea to be not first of all, not true like whatdoes it's the old Henry Henry fordquote right. If I askd my customers, whatthey wanted, they' ask for a faster horse right, like sometimes yourcustomers, don't know what they want and it's better to solve their problems.And so, if you focus on a customer and try to solve their problems or be ableto create stuff that that makes their life easier, they might not always knowwhat's right, and so it's being able to do that, and you do that throughobservation through data collection through as I'll give you an example,the one of the things that I was working with the university with theArizona State University with the their union, people right, they had a fire,they burned down part of the union, so they were rebuilding and they wanted byhelp and thinking about what it should look like. What are the what are thethings that they need to build, and I always think about asking customers thestudents right like a passive, aggressive suggestion box right likelike asking them what they want. They might give you an answer, but thatmight not be the right answer or they might just give Ou an answer becauseyou're asking for one, they might not have thought of it or they might notcare about it as much as you think. So. What I suggested was, let's just watchthem: Let's just see what they do and what we found were students coming intothe union with their c the end of their cord of their laptop like lookingeverywhere for a plug right. They might not have said Hey. We want more outletsthat might not be top of Lomi or we would see students coming in and it'sthe middle of summer and they're wearing hoodies with their hood on,because the air condicioers too cold right. So we can observe and get toanswers so much better than asking them t what they what they want. In that scenario, Gosh, it seems likeyou could ask them what problems they think they have as part of it as well.Yeah I supposed to ask them for the solution. Ask them about their problems.Sure yeah now ask them. You know. What's your experience like there'snothing wrong with that? All I'm saying is that this idea that you know youbuild what your customers want. Isn't necessarily like you know, if you thinkabout Google, for example, as a company, not even because I work there searchwas a Sol problem. When, when Google started right, we had all o this Stufh,we had Yahoo, we already had searchintons right. If you think aboutthe crome browser right, the brows Internet prowser was a so issue right.We already had it. If you think about Gmail Gmail was a SALV Disa. You knowemail as a solv problem. No, it wasn't right unto what we found were theproblems in thet. We didn't ask customers, Hey. Do you want a new emailplatform right? The chromebook was solving a problem. So so it's aboutidentifying a problem, and sometimes your customer doesn't know what thepromise doesn't mean. You shouldn't ask him: doesn't EU Shuldn't talk to him,I'm just saying that you got to go beyond that Yep, and that is justthat's the essence of an iterative and innovative approach that these selfproblems aren't actually necessarily solved at all, even if the custem mightfeel like they are right by the way shark. You know if you watch Sharkteck,I'm like I love watching. I my life and I love watching shorttank and everytime you sit there you're like why didn, I think of that or, like you know, likethose the solutions that some of those people ve come up with, were solutionsto problems that you never identified right. So how would you ever identify,even though this clear Aftr, you see the thing You'e like the scrum, Daddy,of course right like here's, a gazillion dollar company, the guycreated this thing and you're like you...

...know, we've been watching dishes for athousand years, and this guy came up with this idea and it solved theproblem, lots of problems, and it was just brilliant like so so yes askingcustomers talking to customers absolutely, but observing them watchingthem. You know getting to know their. What their problems are by doing thosethings is absolutely beneficial so good and for all the folks who are listeningthat work at softhware companies. Obviously your data can give you a lotof you know. If you can't stand in a student union watch where people arecoming and going and how they're behaving you can still watch theirbehavior through feedback channels on how the software is being used, ind,where they go and what they do and how long they spend there and all that newidea. Generation Ze doesn't care nearly as much about satisfaction as they doabout relationships, yeah yeah. So I've been speaking a lot about generation,Ze and the things that they care about, and I've been talking, the mostly theuniversities and businesses that are about to face generations e right,whether they are potential customers, clients or even future workers. Here'san example: Three different studies shows showed me that seventy percent ofgeneration Z doesn't want to work for you at all right. They want to do theirown thing, and that is going to have a huge impact. Now, when you- and I yourmight- you might not be as old as I am, but when I was a kid, if I wanted tostart a business, I had to get an investment. I had to get a storefront.I had to get equipment and material, and whatever I was going to sell to,customers had to be something that's common across the bar, because I wantedto bring the most people into my store that took a lot of effort. Today welive in a longtaile economy. You can create a niche about anything and focuson that specific Nich and sell things from your basement. Sell things fromyour from your garage, I can start a flat earth, Tshirt company and sohundreds of flat ell. Unfortunately, thousands of flatterf based on that, like so there's so manylotle niches that you can start it now that we live in this long taile thatyou do not, you don't have to have a solution for the common person. You canhave a solution for a niche and and a problem, solving issue for a niche andthen focus on that. So to your point about you know so part of so so that'sgenerations, the in terms of work and what they're looking for and what theywant to be able to do, and if they, this ties back to what you're saying ifthey do want. If they do work for your company, they want to have meaningfulemployment. They know that seventy percent of Americans are disengagedwith the work. They know that this idea of status and what kind of car youdrive and what kind of house you live. Ind doesn't matter to them. They wantexperiences they want, they want to have a relationship, and so, whetherthey're going to work for you or where there they're one of your futurecustomers, they want the relationship, they want the experience and they wantto know that you're doing things an ethical way. They want to know that youare doing the best you can for humanity and society, because this is theclimatcane generation. This is the problem, ogeing generation right sograta the girl in Norway or Switzerl, and I always get those countriesconfused. She started a environmental movements with students and that she'sgot billioes of students and hundreds of countries protesting climate changeon Fridays from school. She did this off from her home and she was justnominated for Nobel pieace prize and if she wins that will be two teenagersthat have won the Nobel piece prize in the last five years. That's who thisgeneration is. I lovely made the connection there between employees andcustomers, because the the theme is the same. It plays out the same. This kindof you know something that I didn't expect, although in hindsight it makesperfect sense and starting the podcast and out you know a few dozenconversations in is the relationship between the employee experience and thecustomer experience how they both matter, if you're going to attract andrecruit and engage and retain this...

...generation of workers. A lot of thesefactors come to come into play, and so you recruit differently, and you know our Friday. Lunch here at theoffice looks and behaves a little bit differently for that nature ofmeaningful and purposeful employment, and Oh by the way, when you go downthat road- and you start installing these things in your business, in areal, tangible, practical, meaningful way. It's not just scratching the itdghof a younger generation, it's good for everybody, yeah, absolutely yeah andit's attractive to customers as well Howardstern as one of the bestinterviewers of all time yeah. These are great topics the so so I dida Jim just for you by the way Y a Yeai did a video. I did it. One of my Tuvideos is the joke. Is Howard Stern, as t a voiceof my head and I wal Tryi to make a point with that video which is you havea voice in your head? Who is that voice in your head and oftentimes? We think that we're the voice in ourhead and we're not the voice in Teur head comes from our experience, lots offactors and, for me, Howard Stern, was that voice on my head. Since I was inhigh school, I've been listening to him in high school and he is developed intoone of the best interviewers of all time, because he's engaged like you arein this conversation in the conversation he's just not thinkingabout what the next question is he's not thinking about like what theresponse is he's not thinking about what he sounds. Like he's asked somevery stupid questions over the years and listening to him do interviews, but he gets to somereally good answers and he gets some really good questions because he'slistening, he'Spu and, as I said in a video he's playing jazz and e interview,he's going off whatever it is that you're saying and then taking thattrack and at the same time he's trying to understand not so much about likewhat you do but who you are and that those are important things ind. I can'ttell you how many times someone in a howird certain interview how many timeshe makes news, because somebody will rereal something and a Howard, certaininterview. But I can't tell you how many interviewes have said. I can'tbelieve I'm about to say this or I can't believe I just told you that or Ican't believe you knew that and and they dived deep. The great one of thegreat stories is Coin O'Brian, who you think of? Is this poofy guy on TV who's,a funny guy? And he an interview in in the interview he talks about mentalhealth and how he's Di dealt with depression and just hes such a greatinterviewr, and I feel like when I talk to people when I talk on airplanes, forexample, I don't get into this to be like where r you from I'm from New YorkIain' got a friend Ad. You Know Damn Right, like you, I don't like thoseconversations. I get into deep conversations about things becauseHoward stern has been the voice of my head of all these yers. That reminds meof something I literally just engaged in on linked in. It was a quote of aguy who, who was on the podcast. Is Sales Coacha with the trusted advisoris the name of his company Gyname, Charles Green, and he said, stopfocusing so much on your elevator pitch and start focusing on your elevatorquestion. As you were, sharing your observations about Howard Stern. I wasthinking about how valuable that approaches to a to the discoveryprocess in a sales situation, where a good salesperson is going to askmeaningful questions. You know and truly listen not just to move throughthe list of questions and take a note down. So I know how to you know. I KnowWhat hath to send them down, but but to truly listen again, getting back to tosolving problems that the person may not know they have, or you have asolution that they didn't anticipate and then to hear you talk about theairplane made me think of that, like elevator questions to evelevator pitchlike what roads do you like to go down with strangers on airplanes yeah? So Ithat's a great EA. I don't so. I have these giant headphones people confuseme because I'm in Te Public Space and...

...because I'm ot a lot because I do a lotof presentations, they think I'm an extra vert and I'm not an extra vert,I'm an introver. I like the best time in my life, is when I like all week.I've been home and I will sit in my studio and not leave like I love beingin here and because of that, I, when I travel, I have giant headphones on andI and and I don't usually talk to people, but if you get into aconversation at the end of thet conversation were either friends or Ihave Your Business Card, you have mine and we're connecting and because I tryto get into these deep conversations. So, for example, I said a friend of mine she's, anartist in Pittsburgh. I met her on an airplane and she had was Shewas sittingnext to me and her boots were all pinkedit up right. They were like alllike drops of paint, so obviously she was an artist, and so I looked at herand I saw her boots and, I said Hey. I think you got something on yourboot right, like as a joke and that started into Ou knowsht. You think, andwe got into like and Hin she'll sayshe'll say I'm an artist and I'mlike you know like what like finger painting. So I try to be sarcastic and blunt and funny, and Iskip by the like: What's the weather like in Texas, like we don't get intothat, I try to get a Lokal. Did you always want to be an an artist ID likehow Wi wall show me what your work looks like well? Why did you do it thisway, so I get into these deeper conversations with people and that myrelationships with people have started on airplanes because we get into thosedeep conversations, so good, specific insights for sales and for customersuccess. They're, really Fr aningwon work in their professional capacity besincerely interested in the people around you. A people love to talk aboutthemselves and be you're going to learn a ton by engaging people in unique ways.The other thing that that I find when you ask people questions that are kindof unexpected. I call it how's the weather like when you move past thehouse, the weather question rihtpeople learn a lot about themselves and itbecomes a meaningful experience for them. It's like yeah. Why did I becomean arist right? Let me conjure a story. I haven't told in some time for his foryou, my neighbor at the airport here, so that kind of goes into something Iwant to to explore with you, which is you travel a ton? You speak a ton. I'veSeen Your Business Card basket in your utue videos, you don't get rid ofbusiness cards. I've seen your badrack. I only have one badge by the way. It'sfrom e. We did our first ever event just earlier this month than it was. Itwas just awesome, so I only have I spoken that nearly as much as you. Howoften do you travel and speak? It marries, but last year was a crazyARA. I had three hundred thousand miles of travel last year, but I also went toAustralia twice. I went to Hong Kong. I was in some European country at some point, sothis year I just actually checked yesterday. As a matter of fact, I juston American Airlines. I was like seventy five hosand miles this yearalready so I'll easily cross a hundred hosand miles for year, but it varies soI've been home all week. I am next week. I'm in La Twice, I'm speaking, I'mdoing a commencement speech for for College at the end of next week, and sothese day trips here a d tnere, so it all baries it depends and I turn downyou know. Ninety percent of the request that I get to come speak mostly becauseHof schedule you can't, I can't call myself. I can only be in one place at atime, but also I'm trying to limit the amount that I travel because I have afamily. I want to be home. I got projects. I got my youtube channel thatI want to kind of crank on a little bit, but I also can't pass up an opportunityto change what I say change minds right. That's really! I don't go speak to makemyself feel better, I'm an introvert! I don't go so I can hear my own voice. Igo because I'm trying to convince you or something I'm trying to change yourmind. So my talks ar persuasion talks. I try to change your mind, or at leastfor a very split second, give you a different point of view, a differentperspective, and I can't and my favorite thing that someone can say tome- and I just got this linked in you...

...know linked in request, and you know inthe introduction paragraph it a you know Jamie. I heard you speak ninemonths ago and that question that you ask is still bothering me today likethat's that to me is success. Do you have any specific techniques or like?Where did you get your your kind of philosophy or approach with regard topersuasion in particular yeah, and you can tie that also to the question,because I also teach a communication class at the school that I help startthe fingers Coding Academy in Phoenix, and I was going in there every coupleof weeks and teaching tenth graders communication skills and presentationskills and how you will get this question allt time? How do you become agood speak Er, a good presenter, and the answer is a very boring answer,which is you do presentations? That's it you just you just do them and that'show you get better. I don't get nervous when I the last time I got nervous. Ispoke in the White House in the east wing with George Washington staring atthe back of your neck. I was very nervous then, but I usually don't getnervous. I get excited about these presentations because I get to changepeople's minds and I like like being up on stage and talking to people, but howyou become persuasive to me is, by sharing a different point of view, adifferent perspective through stories right and so, for example, one of thethings that I'm focusing on lately is this idea of digital skills right, howare students we've, given our students of paths, we say to them: Oh you're,just born on technology. You just naturally know how to use technologyyouare just around when technology. Therefore, your n exprint technology,we give it we've, given them a pass and we and wrethat's harmful to them. Theydon't know how to use these tools. They don't know how to search. They don'tknow how to this a Spanford say that chose us that eighty percent ofelementary school kids can't tell you the difference between a sponsoredwebsite and a real new site right, so they don't know Haw Uasy toos, and so Iat my Dask, because I'm writing I'm thinking like. What's how do I makepeople understand itright, hi and usually it's by tying something totheir life? And so I came up with this analogy. The best one I can come upwith- and I say it's like cars, all of you are brought home in a hospital in acar. You sat in the back seat of that car facing one way then facing theother way. Then you graduated to the booster seat. Then you moved up to theFRONCI. You spend your whole life in a car. Did any one of your parents say toyou? Look. You were just born with cars. You just naturally know how to use acar, because cars were around when you were born, here's a car. No, we taughtthem how to use cars. We, your parents, taught you had to use a car, they gaveyou the rules of the road, they gave you the official rules and then theygave you the culture rules right where you live. They gave you how not to be abad person how to be offensive, driver Hoo, be a defensive driver and thenthey tested you to make sure you knew how to drive, and then they freaked outfor the first year after you left the house with by yourself in that carright. But for that to me is the same thing just because they're born withtechnology, we just handid them to keep the keys and said: Okay you're goodthey're. Not so I try. My persuasion comes from trying to tell stories oretrying to relate whatever concept I'm trying to build to their lives, so theycan see it from their point of view. I love the analogy as a way to connectwith someone and again, as you offer earlier, just to make people seesomething differently to change the perspective, a little bit like o. It islike that, and that is messed up. I have been thinking about it incorrectlyfor people who are listening, who host speakers. You know people, you know alot of people put on events either internal or external, and they inviteguests and whatever, as someone who's spoken, hundreds and hundreds andhundreds of times yeah. What can someone do to make sure you have agreat experience as a speaker at their event like what could a host do? Whatcould a company do? What could the people you know supporting the event,do to make a better experience? That's a great question. No one's ever askedme that question before and it's...

...something I've obviously given a lot ofthought to because it's my experience. So no that's a that's a really goodquestion. No one's ever asked that question. So it depends on what you'resayng you know. If you are someone who is paying someone to come, speak Y, youhave an expectation for that right. So there's a whole process. I'm you knowif a speaker's bural says hey, we somebody wants to hire you to go speakat this event. There's this kind of expectation about what you do. What theperson does and how you set the whole thing up, but if you are asking someoneto come, speak at your events for free or just covering their expenses, whichhappens to me a lot right because of the world that I'm in there are thingsthat you can do, even if you're not paying the person to h, even if you aregiving them a good experience and the the greatest experiences I have is.When I show a you know, you show up at midnight at a hotel that they book foryou and you go up to your room and on your room I's like a small bottle ofwine and some nuts in the car that says, hey welcome Mo Houston. Thank you somuch for Commin. That just means so much right. That's like oh! Thesepeople care that I'm here and they're thankful that I'm here that's oneexample something that you can do. Another thing I always find interestingis at the end of your talk it most of the time you don't get anything,especially if you're doing it for free. For your time- and I love when someonehands me, you know a bag of gifts and I don't Ben like expensive things. I meanlike a Tshirt from your company or you know a new speaker whatever it is, butsomething something that says I thought about you speaking here. I thank youfor you speaking here. Here's a little gift for you that you that remind youof this experience right, like that happens a lot, but it happens less thanyou would think, and so those types of like I guess they all fall into thesame category, which is I'm thanking you and thinking of you inthis process D- And here you go, you know something else could be hey. Whenare you coming in? We want to arrange for a car service to pick you up right,like just the little things that you can do to say. I'm thinking about yousacrificing your time and your energy and your and your passions to come. Dothis. Those are always great. I love it. It's just is really it's the gift ofattention, yeah forethought and a little bit of the time that goes intoit. It doesn't have to be expensive and it works not just for speakers, but foranyone Theys just showing people that you care hey. This has been awesomeyeah. I could go a lot a lot longer, but we both have other things. We haveto do today, Ih've, no idea where we are on time, but I'm going to closewith you, where I always close relationships or our number one corevalues you're at Bombam and on the show- and so I like to give you the chance tothank or mention someone who's, had a positive impact on your life or yourcareer and give a shout out to a company. That's doing customerexperience really well, you already did it off the top, but maybe the the onesure you and that's like that's great- that you're able to do that and youknow so for me. I and it's a group of people right, it's the educators in mylife, specifically when I think about educators in my life, I think about MrsReddick and fourth grade and the reason why I think about hers, because I stillremember handing her my first kind of current events, paper and- and I wouldskape by with school work, and I do the bare minimum and I would always pass orat least get bees. I didn't care that much, but she was the first teacher whotook one of my current event papers. This is fourth grade and like there wasso much red on that. I thought she spilled like blood on this thing right.So she handed it back to me and she she didn't give me a gray. She goes thisisn't good enough and then just walked away from me like like. She knew that Iknew it wasn't good enough right and that that ace just pissed me off andI'm like Oh yeah. I can do better than this I'll show you and so educators,like that there's my mat teacher in ninth grade people think they'reterrible at math. They don't know Mat. My Mat teacher ninth grade wasentertaining. He was totally into it.

He showed me the Matrix right when Icall mat like he said something and, and I've kind of made it my own sincethen, but the fact that math is everything right. If you understand tat,you understand the Matrix, everything has math in it, there's nothing thatdoesn't have math in it and when you see the world that way from thatperspective, that point of view it does so much for you so my teachers. MyFourth Grade Teacher, my ninth grade teacher, my college professors. I oftentell the story when I was in even in college and I was going to Grad. Iwanted to go to graduate school. One of my college. Professors said you shouldapply to the Kennedy School at Harvard, and I said no kids. Like me, I grew upin house kitchen. I grew up with single mom. I grew up on welfare and foodstamps. I said Kis like me, can't go to Harvard. I get eaten alive at HarvardRight. Obviously I was wrong. I could havegone a Harvard. I would have done well at Harvard I've spoken Ot Harvard, butI didn't know it at the time. And so when I talk to students, I say payattention to the educators and what they tell you, because they know youreally well they're, comparing you to the hundreds of other people andstudents that they've met so they've, giving you good feedbacks o payattention. So as a group, it's the educators in my life and that's why I'mso passionate about educators and teachers and the impact that they canhave, because when I one of the things I say to teachers is that the impactthat you have on students goes on for generations and generations andgenerations, because I have my kids and my kids are doing well because of thesame fourth grade teacher on the ninth grade teacher O, that's the impact. Soas a group, it's the educator's in my life, but someone who's, giving me agood customer experience. What you know the example that I gave earlier is thepolar pro example right. This idea that we've built a relationship like youknow, here's a free thing, because we think that we're going to do businessagain in the future, and I know you're going to buy more stuff from us, Ohere's a free thing, any organization that does that that gives you that kindof attention that gives you that kind of experience compared to a terribleexperience that I had with another company that I won't name because youknow, but that to me, is a good customerexperience and so polar I shot out to Pularprofer what what they've doneanother one just in the same kind of category is road. Microphones. Theyreleased Te Product. He wileless microphone that I've been using. If youwatch my videos and they one of he, the wind little guard, things falls off alot. So when I told him that they said send me, you ow give us your yourmailing address were making a new one. Will send you an you one when it's Ot.That kind of like we're in this together for the long all is the kindof experience that you're looking for and what I think the futureGenerationis going to be looking for as well. I love it. I specially love thisidea, because we do this with software right. So when people email us are callin with something that isn't working properly because software's hard and itdoesn't always work, you know we'll put them on a list. You know we'llcommunicate with them and we'll put them on a list. So when we make aresolve there, we'll reach back out. I've not heard that a story like thatfor a tangible physical product, that's really really cool thea. The otherthing too, and I'll just expand this for the for the common listener. Tothis show, you know this idea of teaching and educating you probably asJamie was telling you this you're, probably thinking back to some of theteachers in your life, but think also about your opportunity to mentor,formerly or informally, the people that are in your organization either on yourteam or not on your team. These impacts that you make on them. They carry youforward in their life and in their experience they carry the company'sname. Ford and ther are representative of yours and of your companies as I youknow. You hope some people stay forever, but you also need people to go ord.They need to go, and so when they go off and do their next great thing, youcan be an important part of that and you'll never know the impact that youmake on all the people that you work with. If you take care to pay a littletime and attention Jamie, this has been...

...awesome for folks that aren't familiarwith Google I'm just kidding. If people want to follow up with you,what are a few ways e could follow up with you. Yes, so first twitter, I'm ontwitter, it's at JCA SAP. Oh it s talk about customer as a customer service.Rap told me, five years ago, ten years ago, when Ilearned us when I said my user name was JC ASAP and Shes, she says back to meinstantaneously, oh just call as soon as possible, and I'm like I'm thirtyfive years old and I've never thought about that right. So so it's JC, asapby message. Button is open. Anyone in the world can send me a message linkedin is the same thing: it's JCAS, P or Jmie Casso reach out on Linkin and, asyou mentioned a couple times- and I thank you for that- I just launch aYouTube channel on this idea of you know, advice and career advice andthing in perspective and I'm trying to bring up topics, and I have a wholelist of topics that I'm going to be talking about on this channel and I'mtrying to do it in a fun way, while I'm traveling to wherever it is that I'mtraveling for different ideas and different topics, and so you can reachon subscribe on Youtube as well same thing as JC ASAP awesome and for folksI agan and you could just Google Jamie, cassip and you'll find a bunch ofkeynotes F. You want to learn about the future of work and go deeper intoeducation and technology, so much good stuff. I sincerely appreciate your timeI enjoyed it. I know listeners enjoyed it as well and ID. I appreciate youyeah. No I enjoyed as well thanks for having the time went by very, very fastcool thanks, Yo much have a great afternoon thanks you to clearcommunication, human connection, higher conversion. These are just some of thebenefits of adding video to the messages your sending every day. It'seasy to do with just a little guidance, so pick up the official book,Rehumanize Your Business, how personal videos, accelerate sales and improvecustomer experience learn more in order today at Bombamcom book, that's Bo, mb,bombcom fuck, thanks for listening to the customer experience. PODCASTremember. The single most important thing you can do today is to create anddeliver a better experience for your customers, continue. Learning thelatest strategies and tactics by subscribing right now in your favoritepodcast player, or visit Bombomcom podcast.

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