The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

29. Making B2B Marketing More Personal w/ Brett Chester

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Most companies forget that an actual person is on the other end of their marketing campaigns. Brett’s experience working with companies all around the globe to help them improve their marketing reminds listeners that every touchpoint is going to reach a human at some point. The better equipped you are to ask smart questions, the more effective your customer’s journey will be, and the more sales you will make. 

As a customer acquisition expert and the VP of Marketing for SiteTracker, Brett shares his secrets to making customers want to engage with your company through asking the right questions, and personalizing the marketing process.

He reflects on his experiences working with major clients around the globe and informs listeners on how they can be more effective marketers. 

We need to be celebrating theindividuals that are successful in order for us as marketers to recognizeand learn from the challenges that our customers are experiencing. The single most important thing you cando today is to create and deliver a better experience for your customers,learn how sales marketing and customer success experts create internalalignment, achieved desired outcomes and exceed customer expectations in apersonal and human way. This is the customer experience podcast. Here'syour host, ethand Baute, hey thanks! So much for clicking playon this episode of the Customer Experience podcast today we're talkingdemandgen and growth, marketing, we're talking customer acquisition andnurturing today's guest is a selfdescribed marketing. Geek he'slaunched an advertising startup and worked at traditional AD agencies inAustralia. He was the customer Acquisitions Manager for Europe, theMiddle East and Africa for a chain of online casinos and he's presently inthe Silicon Valley, as vice president of marketing at site, track or aproject management platform for critical infrastructure like telecomutilities, renewable energy and smart cities. Brettchester welcome to thecustomer experience podcast. Thank you so much for having and it sounds likeI've had ben amazing and ellustrious career. It seems like it's gone passedway so fast, that's good! That's Gooisit! It always looks that way. Inhindsight, it really is cool. I love that's one of the most fun things aboutdoing. The podcast is obviously connecting with folks, like youdirectly and allowing other people to listen in on the conversation, but eventhe kind of the research phase alone and see the shape and the arc ofdifferent careers and and how people find themselves. I feel like just theway you talk about your Workso. I'm excited to speak about it with you theway you write about your work. It feels like you're, absolutely doing the rightthing and that that really lights you up. Thank you so much. It does believeit or not. I started UFF at law, school...

...and haded the law so much and wassitting on a beach and Sunny Sydney, Australia and that's how I fell intomarketing. So there's a chance for anyone out there. You know what, beforewe get to my standard opening question, look what was the moment like what wasthe flip there where you said I'm out and who did you disappoint in thatprocess? Didn't it disappoint in that process? Iwas on track to be the youngest barrister in Australia's history.Actually, so aside from disappining my family, I didn't really end updisappinting them over the long term, actually now that I think about it, butI was literally standing at the Little Beach in Sydne Australia called CampCove, which is just a harbor beach, and I was introduced to somebody who saidHey, we're looking for someone, that's pretty smart to come in and think aboutmarketing challenges, and my favorite subject at at university was a marketing subject.I thought Ohey like I'm coming and have a chat, see what happens and that wasthat was my startin in online casinos, where I standed in marketing back, thenit was really interesting, demand marketing men, sending a million CDs toa suburb in London and seeing how many people would respond, and that was Alalways obviously associated with a code of some description. So we couldattribute it back and you have to wait two months before you saw some resultsnowadays, of course we can do everything in real time and it's youknow that discipline that I created back then that drives the success thatI have now that's awesome. It is, I call the shipping out of CDs, that'sobviously the the AOL model exact most fames. I I wonder how many millions ofpieces they sent so before we go any farther. I like to start with withgetting folks to kind of talk about customer experience when I say customerexperience, what does that mean to you? What are some of its characteristics?How do you think about it? Yeah customer experience for me is...

...the whole life cycle of engaging with abrand. You know, there's not a single,touchpoint or channel that we should ever ignore when it comes to customerexperience, if you think about it, you've got everything from the firsttype. I walked past a store and smelt it all the way through the follow up.Email after I've bought something because I wanted the receipt sent to myemail rather than to me in person. I think that it's not just one singlepoint of touch and the challenge specifically for me as a marketer. WhenI think about it, is you know how do I make sure that all of those touchpointsare considered when we're building campaigns anywhere? So you know, ifyou're out there thinking about customer experience, just remember thatthere's somebody at the other end of that thought process that you're tryingto not only inspire to perform an action but to engage with you at the most human leveland that's you know really difficult and Beter base oftware, which is whereI work. You know I've had a raft of experiences, obviously from onlinecasinos, where we're speaking immediately with somebody WHO's tryingto engage in an activity. All the way through to you know be to be marketingwhere we're trying to solve for problems that those people have thatthey might not necessarily agree. They have or want to admit, having. So everysingle time that you touch, that person is a time for you to be selling, and Ithink it's a God and GECO quote: Wasn't it always be selling or always beclosing something like that? But you need to remember the other person atthe other end of the spectrum that you're talking with love it. That's athat's a really popular theme in general. I've seen it for several yearsnow is like btob BTC, really it's all just age to ah human to human, exactlywhich is a really healthy attitude, and then the other thing you offered therein particular, is that having some forcesight in imagining the the touchpoints in advance is always really helpful. You'll never get it completelybecause you know it's GOINGL touchpoint,...

...but so before we go farther for context,just talk a little bit about sit track or really interesting platform,especially, I was interested the way you talked about. You know problem theymight not know they have or one they might not not like to talk about oracknowledge, and then the other side of that too, is you of fer solution thatthey might not know is available. It's a problem they're just going tocontinue suffering with you know it not imagining that there's a solutionavailable, so talk about site tracker in the work that you guys are doing asa team. There yeah it's it's a really interesting product and a reallyinteresting space. I've had the pleasure of working across a couple ofdifferent startups, and this is the first startup that I've been at wherewe've had not only amazing product market fit, but an amazing managementteam to support it, and so obviously our growth numbers reflect that, butessentially what we do is we are a project and asset management platform.So if you imagine one of our customers is a company called Vorizon, yyouve,probably heard of them, and what we do for rerizon is allow them to deploy andmaintain their network so that we can all maketelephone calls and watch Netflix on the go. So what that means is that they have mobile cell towers and, alongwith Mybol, sell towers, they have small cells and, of course, that'swhat's supposedly going to be powering Fiveg, which is the new wave oftechnology. That's coming down the pipeline, and what we allow them to dois make sure that the deployment of all of those assets that the small cells orthe tower and Tenos get put at the right place at the right time so thatthey can hit their roadmap and that they can do it efficiently andeffectively. So it's a really interesting challenge and it's quitefulfilling to know that, where you know powering critical infrastructure forfor the country, but at the same time, if you're a project manager thatstarted out twenty years ago in the...

...deployment of of Cell Towers forVorizon or any of the manifestations of that company over the last twenty years,you probably would have been working in a spreadsheet of some description andfor the longest time that basically meant that you'd build out this twohundred line chart. That would say I do this and you do that and maybe, if youwere lucky, you had a project management software like Microsoft,project and you'd, assign again chat to it. So you can share that with yourboss, but in reality the world that we're moving into now ewe're, goingfrom two hundred thousand towers that Hav supported the infrastructure in theUS to eight hundred thousand small sells over the next five years. So Isaid that again, twenty years two hundred thousand towers five years,eight hundredthousand small cells. That's a lot of work, so the inevitableconsequences that people are falling behind. They're not able to do thedeployments that they need to do. Thankfully vorizons one of ourcustomers and so they'r deplying on time and on budget, most importantly onbudget and they're, bringing their cell towers on air much faster than anybodyelse, which basically means they're fulfilling their promise to theircustomers and we're helping them do that. So it's quite rewarding andthat's happening across all sorts of different businesses and the utilityspace and in alternative energy, ev charging and believe it or not partycities, one of our customers, because they need to spring up new stars whenHalloween comes around and guess what it's a repeatable task. That's supereasy for you to complete in our platform, so it's really rewarding anda great software. So good I hear thenor. I imagine that I s it's a relativelycomplex sale and it probably has a a nice medium size sales cycle. So foryou is VP of marketing. Having just come off that definition of customerexperience in knowing that it's all the touchpoints were a few for a complexsale for for a problem. People might...

...not know that there's a solution forwhat are a handful of the key moments in the life cycle or tea moments, inthe experience that you like to really make sure are well managed and welldelivered yeah, it's a great question and I think Al Lonsrer with thequestion that I asked myself all the time, which is if there are people outthere suffering with the problem, and they don't know that they necessarilyhave that problem. How do we introduce that concept to them? And that's that'sa challenge for be to be marketers everywhere right, no one wakes up inthe morning and says I need a project management solution. I've been doingthis in Excele for twenty years. I need to change unless that's the brand newbusiness or it's a transfer of knowledge from one company to another.It's not really the day that somebody wakes up and goes. This is what I needI'm going to search for it in Google, so it's quite hard for you to thinkoutside that paradigme, if you're not used to it. So the way I like to thinkabout this is in a couple of different ways. The first is, let's create someawareness, let's get it out there. Let's get this thought process outthere and I'm not sure when this is going to airbut we'rreleasing a campaign next Monday, which is talking about being ahero of change and literally about empowering people at companies like theones we're targeting to be heroes of change. So it accepts that they have anopportunity to help their business out and to step up and raise their hands,because one of the big barriers is s that I don't want to say anything. Whywould I buck the status quote so? Making people feel empowered that theycan change? The status quote is super important for us and creating thatawareness that there is a problem is obviously aligned with that. So, whenI'm thinking about the the types of marketing opportunities and challengeswe have and how that relates to customer experience, I want to makesure that we have both the awareness...

...problem checked off as well as theexperience checked off and yeah. What does that mean for us next week onMonday, when we launched this campaign, it means that, quite literally, we'regoing to be ate to show we're going to have the best booth that anyone has itthat show by far- and I don't say that in an arrogant way, just that I can seethe effort that we've put into it, and I know that it's going to be the bestbooth and so the most minute detail at that booth we've got hero packs forthese heroes are changed to take away with them very very targeted messagesinside that park is like a Cape, quite literally with our logo on it. Sopeople can run around like lunatics talking about how theyare a hero ofchange, but more actionably, we've actually gotten to the grandyeerdetails where weave said. How can I take my learnings from this event andaction them when I get back so we've, given them a step by step guide onthings that they need to do so again? What I'm thinking about is activatingpeople to think this is what it is that my challengesbe giving them in an experience that they can take away with actionablesteps. So what I've done is actually sit in theie their shoes, so whal, I'mat a show, I'm at an event. It could be a boondoggl where I could just sitaround and Y. U have a couple of beers or I could actually take something awayfrom this. So you know we've thought about all the little details from theshade of grass that we've got on our booth. We've got some beautiful, big,green walls to the fragrance that were actually putting in the booth so thatwe make feel people feel welcome and at home. So it's all about the experience.It's about the enter end cycle and putting yourself in the shoes of yourbuyer to let them know that you know. There's a solution fall them out that Ithink one of that most valuable and important things you share. There isthe idea that your customer is the hero and that you are there to equip andempower them to be successful. Exactly exact Sosari side trackers, not thehero, no exactly yeah, we've got some...

...fantastic metrics that make you thehero, but you're the one that uses our solution, you're or customer, and andmaking sure that you can champion not only yourself but our solution to yourpeers and your bosses or your reports even is: What's going to grow yourcareer and it's what's going to make you successful. You know we have a blog series that we write calledprojects of life and in projects life. We interview fearless project managers.People are just getting ut there and changing the game for their business,but at the same time we're also interviewing. You know a professor fromrutgers who basically wrote the book on Project Management, and so what I'm?What I'm trying to share here is is that we need to be celebrating theindividuals that are successful in order for us as marketers to recognizeand learn from the challenges that our customers are experiencing. Otherwisewe're just going to be bashing our heads against the wall, so good. It'show I learned so I've been I've, been here at Bombom, the software company. Iwork at for almost eight years and over that time I've told so manycustomer success stories and shared use cases and things, and you really it'sin that process of organizing that information and building thatrelationship to get not just the permission, but all the details and thetactics for how they're being successful with the software thatreally allows you to speak to other people like them really well, so I lovewhat you're up to there I'm going to stay on this kind of like human to human track here, becauseyou're right there, you know speaking to the individual and celebrating theindividual and then empowering other people to give themselves permission tobe successful as well. Ecaus a lot of people just don't want to Welcomei.This is it's part of a common superhero story to just to walk out your CapeRight. It's like this. Exactly I had been given this power, but I need toyou know: I's part of the origin store is like. I need to deny this power. Ican't accept this powers. Hitch...

...responsie to all this stuff right, soyeah yeah, exactly so so, like you've worked globally, obviously in Australiaacross North America, Asia, Pacific Europe, Middle East Africa, with withthe casinos talk a little bit about the differences, maybe in customers orcustomer expectations were in customer experience across all these differentregions or flip side of it. There really isn't any fundamental difference.People are people are people. Are People like talk about that and you'vetruly worked globally in a really sounds like you've done, some a lot ofdirect response marketing so like there's a lot of like? Are theredifferences around the globe in your observation and experience? Yeah,definitely, look I think the short answer is yes, and the longer answer isobviously more nuanced. I think that you, if you start to think about let'sjust park a language for a second. Obviously, language is important. Ifyou're going into the French market or the Japanese market, you need to be inlocal language. So if we just assume for a sepond that there's you know, weaccept that local language is something that we have to do, particularly inspecific markets. I think that, at the end of the day, there are things thatmake it culturally different for you to communicate. You know I was inLuxemburg a couple of weeks ago at a trade show called arch summit, which isvotophone's largest supplier conference, and there I had the pleasure of meetingeveryone from Nobel Lauriat to the Prime Minister of Luxemburg, throughthe average Joe who is using the software, and the reality is thatculturally, your difference is Eur opeans attending to be more polite thanYanks, which is okay but they're, also moreformal. At the same time, so I think respecting the cultural noms in thearea that you're working in knowing those cultural, nons and obviouslyaddressing them in advance makes sense.

It's Dear Mer, something in Germany.It's not hey frank until you get to know them so excepting those culturalnorms is super important. That No side of things is that ultimately they'resuffering with the same challenge as you are. They are the same person, youknow Frank in Midwest, Ohio or wherever it is, is the same as the the frankfrom Badenbadn. It may just be said, frank or frank. It's the exact samechallenge, so you know as a marketer as an individual who is constantly lookingfor a way to humanize the experience. What I'm trying to do is forget aboutthe cultural noms and cut to the rout of the value of what solution we'retrying to provide or the problem that they're experiencing, and that's the atthe core of everything that we do and, of course you then wrap that in thosethose subtle differences, but I think it's a yes no address the subtledifferences but make sure at the end of the day, you are speaking to thechallenges that you're solving for an. I could give you loads of differentexamples across different businesses from a guy called. Why won't share hisname because he's from onmy casinos, but he he lives in Qait where gaming isillegal, but he's still to this day has one of the largest affiliate networksin Cuaite for this online casino chain, because we established the foundationwhat it means to be a casino goern in Qa back in the day and he's stillbringing in a hundred to a hundred and fifty thousard us a month out of hisaffiliate network him and five guys all the way through to you know what I justshared with you about the PM and Luxemburg the prime minister. Overthere it's yeah, I asked him or I asked his aid. How does he like to bereferred to Mr Prime Minister, and he...

...goes no just call him his first name,it's like! Well, I'm not going to do that. So there are cultural noms. Youneed to be sensitive to, but selling the value and selling the solution tothe problem is always what everyone wants to hear and what they should here.Yep and then there's the human nature layer where we are all a lot moresimilar than we think so. You are a great linked in post onthe process of process to generate in marketing theright information to make a sale, and it was based on your effort and failedeffort to tell a laptop bag in just a couple minutes. Can you unpack that alittle bit, I found your steps just as sensible as your approach to workingwith people across cultures and regions. Look, it was. It was the most iopeningopportunity for me and then to tie it back. Obviously, many years later I hade the fortunate experience between finishing high school and going off touniversity to work at what would be the equivalent of best by in Australia. Iwas very lucky to start there and en operations role and then very quickly,move into the head of operations position that came with its ownchallenges like how does a seventeen year old manager, team of six peoplewho have been there and done that but yeah. Once you kind of ignore that andmove on, I was in a situation where there were no sales people on the floor.Looking to sell and the head a sales comes over to me andbasically San get out there, and you know you know all of this stuff get outthere and sell to this lady. So I walked up to ther and had a chat, andshe told me that she was interested in he laptop bag and by Golly did I showher every single laptop bag we had. I was so proud to no every single fixturefeature wherever zip was what color or is it was whether this was nappeleather or just plainold bake leather. I showed her. Everything that you couldpossibly imagine on over fifty or sixty different lapsop bags bless her heart.Forty minutes later she kind of turned...

...around to me and said you know whatyou've given me too much to think about. I I'm Goin to have to have a think onthis and come back. Oh really, that's you should bet choosing one of theselike. Why are you leaving Si you've just told me too many things. I need tothink about this. Meanwhile, what I realized afterwards by walking in andhaving a chat with Kent Hi, was the head of sales. He goes like whathappened. You know she was primed ready to buy a lapsup back a d when I toldher everything that she needed to know, and he basically slapped me over theback of the head and said you know what laptop did she by what Lat uptod shenade the bad for. Oh, I never asked and tying that back to modern day marketingand even modern day sales. When we're thinking about software selling, weneed to do discovery. We need to ask simple questions of the people that arevisiting our website ar are engaging with us in some fashion and just get toknow them like you know, we're selling to people that are looking to buythings, but if we don't understand the paradigm in which they are operating inwhich their life exists were never going to be able to sell, tor them andwe're just going to confuse them. Sou know if I think about about what we'redoing here at sidetracker. If I'm not asking a simple question like what isthe paradign that you operate your projects in right now, it's as good andRESPONSOS, not asking the lady with Er laptup bag. You know what is thefifteen inch compact that you had that? No one actually probably even knowswhat a compact is anymore. I think they got bought by Fhilett Packard, but weneed to ask questions. We need to diagnose in advance and removeobjections by asking smart questions by doing the Discoveryng, the diligence tounderstand the paradim in which our prospects and customers are operatingit so good. I mean it's just an advocating forgetting in conversationthan ultimately getting into relationship, which is obviouslyfundamental to a longer sales cycle,...

...ind a more complex sale, but itobviously as well lends itself to writing better content, an runningbetter ads from an Seo sem standpoint, because you know it's not about thatindividual. In particular. It's about that persona that you learn by talkingwith enough of those people so good. I just got a few quick fun questions foryou before we hit us kind of a standard close here. What do you wish more salespeople knew or understood about marketers or marketing? I think that the effort that it takesto get an answer to their request right, yeah, I'm Gonto, talk about eventsagain, just because it's just top of mind for me: We've Goit a big event.Next week, as I said, you know, there's three or four months of effort thatgoes into an event. The salespeople show up at the booth. We've got eightdemostations, they do what they have to do, and they don't appreciate the eightmonths or three months of effort goingto it so there's. There's eightsales people standing around thinking. This thing came together by some sortof miracle behind the scenes. There's four or five people working on all ofthe collateral making sure the booth smells right, all those types of thing. So I'd lovefor sales, people to actually appreciate the amount of effort ittakes to complete tasks that they may think its frivolous, but actuallyrequires some nuance thinking and effort, that's good how I've been there. What do you wish more customer successor customer support? People knew about marketing or marketers the channelsthrowe available to them to execute on their plans right. I think that you K OCSM struggle with communication on Thas and there's an opportunity to leveragemarketing tools and marketing grunt to be able to allow that to happen,particularly when you're dealing at scale, it's impossible for you to dothat. SOM. My advice to anycsm out there is to sit down with your head ofmarketing or ahead of any department in racketing, and just basically say youknow: What can we do to have you guys...

...act as a false mall supplier for us andthen what is it that we can do to provide you any contental collateral oreven problem recognition or paternt recognition of problems so that I cancome back and fed into the prospecting cycle? Good stuff relationships are ournumber one core value here and I would love for you to thank ormention someone who's had a positive impact on your life or career and acompany that you feel is delivering really good experiences to their totheir customers. Yeah for sor, I'm a big shoe fan, so I'm a big fiend whenit comes to Nike's customer experience. I think they've got all the channelscovered. I never complaind about them and that's why my wife's probably takenmy credit card away from me so that I can't add to my hundred and twenty paircollection and growing. So I'm big fan an Ike. The person that's made the mostimpact on my life and I'd always Hark back to is the Xcoo of OGLV, Australia.The guy called Mike Bryan. He had such an amazing career and hes still got anamazing career, it's just no longer in ogovy anymore, but he was hugelyimpactful on my life and I'm always grateful and always thinkfondly of him and always reach out to him to tell him as much that's so good,it's important to double back on those. That's why I askd the question so good.I love those stories real kind of a practical matter here when you get intothe triple digits on shoes. How much is the? How much of this is? Iwant the perfect pair for every occasion and how much of it is. This isjust a straight cataloge collection, eating away at some space in anoversized walk in closet. Like do you do rotatin and out of these hundredhundred plus shoes yeah, I do it's more an aestheically pleasing thing that I'mgoing for. I actually like the design elements of them and I do rotate them alot. So I end up wearing any day of the...

...week a couple F, different Pars oracross the week I probably wear five or six different pesofshes. It's just Ilike them, they're aesthetically, pleasing and it's a great way for me tobe comfortable whilst Yeu, just still being a little bit cooler for my ye. Igot bold head and I fact out, I'm pretty old so going to keep up withthese young kids. That's great. It's I mean again. This is this: Is IMPA Nikea probably delivering you a lot of really nice purchasing and shoppingexperiences delivering on the product, basic product quality itself, butempowering you to express your taste, your a wonderful taste and ability tothat o matches you to addy outfit. In any occasion, my wife disagrees, butyes yeah it's good as, as are all thingsthat are subjective in nature. There's this exactly! This has been awesome. You arejust an really good spirit. I, like the work that you're doing in the way thatyou're thinking about it and approaching it, and if someone wants to follow up on thisconversation, how can they connect with you online or connect with site trackeryeah for sor just reach out to me as an individual on twitter? You can find meas at breachester or on Linkon, at rechester or on facebook at recchester.There's a bit of Patten ther. You can also email me directly, the chester atside Trackercom, but I'm across social. If you search for Breadchester Yourlfind my website and you can send me a contact us kind of note there as well awesome so good. Iencourage people to do so. I'm linked in by the way that story that Ireferenced. You need to go connect with Brett and check that story out, if onlyto see the repeated but varied and I'm sure very accurate descriptions of thesales manager at the Organizat...

...okant yeah. Thank you so much yeah,it's fun. It was fun to read it. You obviously had fun writing that one. Idid yeah cool. I appreciate your time so much. I know folks enjoyed thisepisode and, if you want to hear more like this, please subscribe to thecustomer Experience Podcast, obviously in itunes or apple podcast. It's alsoavailable and spotify sound cloud in a variety of other places, and if youwant to see video clips and get overviews of these episodes, you canjust visit Bombombcom podcast thanks again for listening and thank you,agaiing Brett, for your time today pleasure. Thank you, clear, communication, human connection,higher conversion. These are just some of the benefits of adding video to themessages your sending every day. It's easy to do with just a little guidance,so pick up the official book, Rehumonize Your Business, how personalvideos, accelerate sales and improve customer experience learn more in ordertoday at Bombam Fcom Bock, that's bomb combcom fuck, thanks for listening tothe customer experience. podcast remember the single most importantthing you can do today is to create and deliver a better experience for yourcustomers, continue. Learning the latest strategies and tactics bysubscribing right now in your favorite podcast player, or visit Bombomcompodcast.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (171)