The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

30. Avoiding Branding and Marketing Mistakes While Driving Fast w/ Dave Knox

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

No one can tell the future.

And if anyone claims they can, walk away… slowly.

Yet, there are ways to anticipate some of the biggest turns your business will encounter.

Brand builder, digital transformer, venture investor, and startup advisor, Dave Knox, opens up about three major mistakes he sees startup marketers make. As an independent strategic advisor and host of the Predicting the Turn podcast, Dave has seen the entire gamut of startup mistakes, big business blunders, and enterprise slip-ups.

He has turned all of his experiences into a career of helping businesses anticipate market changes. In this episode, we cover the struggles Fortune 500s are experiencing, holistic customer experience, and more.

The great marketing teams are the oneswhere the marketing leader is comfortable enough with their own skinthat they say I am great at this, and I'm going to hire somebody better thanme in this this and this area. The single most important thing you cando today is to create and deliver a better experience for your customers,learn how sales, marketing and customer success experts create internalalignment, achieved desired outcomes and exceed customer expectations in apersonal and human way. This is the customer experience podcast. Here'syour host beef and beaute hey welcome back to the customerexperience podcast you're, going to love this episode, our guest works atthe intersection of brands and technology, with a focus on startups,seed funding and venture capital he's currently a strategic adviser atpredicting the turn he's also a podcast hoast of the same name predicting theturn he's a managing partner at Vine Street ventures cofounder at thebrandary, which is a techiccelerator. I look forward to learning a little bitmore about that and also interesting hereis that he spent seven years of CMOat rockfish. This is a company that's owned by WPP, formerly known as aglobal advertising and PR agency, but now they call themselves a creativetransformation agency. I can see that becoming a conversation theme heretoday and so our guest today Dave Knox. Welcome to the customer experiencepodcast. Okay, thank you for Everymin Yeah. I'm really excited about this. Ithink there's, obviously a lot going on with with brands technology disruption,innovation and you're kind of in an interesting seat around all of that,especially over the past decade. I look forward to getting into it, but I wantto start where I always start, which is your definition or your thoughts oncustomer experience. Yeah, so custmer experience you being a brand guy bytraining. I started my career proctor and gamble back in the day and I thinkof customer experience is being everything. That's the front of theHouse, anything that touches that consumer and can influence how theythink about your company, your brand, your business. So that's everythingfrom the essence of the brand design to marketing to sales, to how you show upa retail that customer experiences every single one of those touch pointsrolled together. That's awesome. You've given me language that I haven't heardon this question before I've asked it dozens of times it's this cleardelineation between front of House and back of House back of House being, ofcourse, the things that most people don't see in front of House being toyour point, everything that everyone experiences. So I love that so Gointoyour branding background. You know, I've had I've had a couple brandingexperts on the show and and ID put you probably adjacent to, if not in thatcategory iwl. Let you decide how you feel about that, but there seems to bea fair amount of overlap from time to time in talking about customerexperience and brand experience or...

...branding. What do you see therelationship there as being and where they similar, where they different? Doyou have a line between those two or do you see them as approximatelysynonymous yeah? I think, frankly, they're they're, similar in theire? Ifnot completely overlapping customer experience is definitely an emergingfield that the language has really only come about. I'd, say in the last decade:You've seen it in the public eye. It wasn't something that when we weregetting the training and branding back in the day was ever really talked aboutis its own thing. It was just the essence of one of the things that youhad to do, but with the rise of B to B marketing and the right of direct toconsumer efforts, I think that's what's given rise, the language of customerexperience, but if you're not doing branding the right way, if you're, notthinking about it as part of your core efforts there, what is the essence of good branding toyou? What what is this outcome if someone is committed to brand building?What are the obvious consequences of that yeah? So the essence of I thinkwhat makes great branding is evoking emotion, because that's what a brandcomes down to is it sparking something in a person when they see what you arehear, what you are when they hear your brand? Do they know something and does't invoke an emotion with it and there's a wide range of what thatemotion can be, but great branding has thought about that has dictated it andit's been planned across the board and it's where it goes back to its beingacross every touchpoint think about a company like Zappos. You can think alot of things with that, but essence, it's going to be a great experience,that's probably what you evoke and that feeling of happiness that goes into it,love it. The feeling part of it is often something that someone will offerin the definition of customer experience and so to rap both of thosetogether. They are very, very overlapping. This is just a personalcuriosity. For me, I mean coming up in PNG. I imagine you got essentially theequivalent of an MBA in your in your onboarding and training. What was thatexperience like for you and how dod that shape your career yeah? It's funny.You use those those words of like an MBA, because for me that's exactly whatit was PNG, especially brain management, 's kind of unique place in that. Probably about ninety to ninety fivepercent of my colleagues as assistant brain managers were coming from an NBAprogram and coming from usually a top tier, whether it was a a booth or aharbard or something of that nature. I was a twenty two year old kid comingfrom a Public University with you, K, ow, just a bachelor of science andbusiness. So for me it really really was the MBA, because one of the thingsthat's amazing, of a fortune five hundred company that invest in theirpeople. Is You get that trading you probably every week for my first two,if not three years, there was a training that I was going to. Thatwould either be a couple of hours or full day. Every time when you gotpromoted, you went to assistant brand...

...manager, college, then brand manager,college and so forth, and so on, and you know those were week long all day,events that they flew everyone in from across the globe. That was in yourclass and at your level. So for me, it really was that NBA that kind oftraining, but I think where it was differed from just a classroom. MbaWACD you combined that learning with the fact. At the same time, you wereputting those principles to work the next day you weren't just talking intheory and CSE studies, but you were owning a twenty million dollarmarketing budget the next day and doing something with it. So that's why youknow I do a lot of Tok at college campuses and especially when I talk toncrenur students. They want to go start a business right away at twenty two andI'll encourage a lot of them of go, find a place that you can get thattraining first, because me at twenty two made a lot of mistakes and it was alot better to be making those mistakes on the budget of a several billiondollar company. Then my tiny budget, if I was an metrepreneur right, you knowyour error in that context- is arounding your versus and error withyou as a you know, a twenty two year old, maybe startup founder, could befatal. Yes, that's exactly it and it's one of my first bosses. He said thegreat thing he goes. You just remember that we've created a system that has asafety belt on you, so drive the Fark car as fast as you can, and we knowthat we've got the sea felt you'll be safe. I love it, it's it its such goodpermission. It sounds like there's a really good culture there o like when Ithink about. Are you familiar with the service profit chain loosely but not into it at it? Soundsit basically, the premisis. You know so many people focus on the far end ofrevenue and Growth, but these are outcomes of a whole series of eventsthat walk back through the customer all the way back to employees, and so the premise is that when you invest inhiring on boarding training developing and you produce a good employeeexperience that everything else falls out from there's a consequence sofocused there. It sounds like that was part of your experience there PNG. I'mglad I ask that's great, and it actually leads me into a pair ofquestions that that I had prepared, which I'll ask the first what'shappening at the intersection of brand and technology from a startupstandpoint, and then the and then the followup is what's happening there fromyou know, maybe a fortune, five hundred or just a generally a medium Ol LargeCorporation standpoint like at that intersection of Brandon Technology,where you kind of live and work and talk and advise, and probably, studyand publish Etcera talk about that intersection from kind of a startuppoint of view. Yes, so I think one of the things that's really emerged is thefact that you have that prominence of branding and marketing coming into play.One of my good friends is a guy named Tim Cop, who was the CMO for exacttarget and when Tim joined, is the CMO there in two thousand and seven he kindof had the premise that most of the B...

Ta Bee World wasn't practicing brandmarketing. They had demand generation and they had traditional B TobMarketing. But really this essence of bringing brand into the world oftechnology was something that not many people had done, and so that'ssomething he really focused on, and I think he was a pioneer in a lot of waysbecause fast forward, you know ten years later and I think actually, someof the most exciting marketing that's going on and the most exciting brandwork is actually being led from the btob world. Instead of the BTC worldand Iraqly the BT s world is becoming more about Demanen and performancemarketing, which used to be the premise of the beat of the back in the day. Soyou've got this blending where I think people are switching in between boththose worlds kind of interchangeably. As a result, welhe kind of answeredboth questions in one there and it sounds like there's just a little bitof a flip flop there, which is really interesting. Why do you think that isthe case? I id just a couple ideas that came to mind as you were talking aboutit, but you know why do you think that's the case that BTC has to yourview, maybe historically been less demandgen based and moving in thatdirection, and startups and tech being less brand focused and started movingthat way or so be to be rather yeah. So I think the BTC one is a really simpleone, which is the rise of direct to consumer brands, has changed thebusiness that these guys have to be it because you know you look at a PNG orUni leaver and even a Ford Motor Company. We called them the biggestconsumer marketing companies out there, but they actually didn't sell directilyto the consumer. You know the auto guys had to go through their dealerships.The PNGS and the UNI leavers had to go through Walmart and target they neveractually own the n customer, and that's why you would hear in those worlds theytalked about a customer in a consumer. Walmart was the customer and theconsumer was the person that was buying the product. So that's one change.That's played out, I think, in a lot of cases and then on the flipside. The way,the reason for B to be is the isay infusion of technology into the livesof BTB has caused a cold that has taken place and what I mean by that is thinkback two thousand eight, two thousand and nine is you know the iphone wasjust coming out, t used to be the you know the enterprise and the it guysthey dictate what technology you got issue you get your blackberry get yourlapptop and then you had all these people that had two phones. They hadtheir work blackbeiry and they had their personal iphone and the iphonegot started dragging in and you know more and more into be to be, and whatended up happening is the consumer and customer experience that you had withan iphone with facebook with every...

...piece of technology? You would thenwalk into the workplace and expect that same level of high and experience, andthat's really, I think, driven that behavior- that in turn cause all the Bto be marketers have to elevate their game. In the same way, I love it's areally interesting, pushing pull there. He mentioned earlier that some of themmore exciting and interesting marketing is being done in the btob space. Whatare a couple things that come to mind there yep, so you one of the ones andial. I know you have a favorite question around WHO's. Doing customerexperience right. So one of the companies I love is terminus andterminus is one of these great startups. That's really redefining this world ofaccount fase marketing and what I love is it's a two fold thing one I justthink account base marketing as a whole is one of the more interestingtrandswere seeing in the world ofd marketing today, and the orchestrationand coordination of a great abm campaign requires you to just be agreat strategic marketer. It's about an art and science that combines so one. Ilove the fact that they're helping rise, you know, give rise to that, butthey're also practicing what they preach, and you look at the work thatthey're doing with flip my funnel creating the community around that thepodcast that creates the content with it. All of those efforts together arejust truly truly top notch across the board yeah. I love it. It's a greatexample: Sangram vagere leads it as kind of the face and the personalityand the in the podcast host a often a speaker as well, and really coming froma place of value and education and building a community around the conceptor the problem of contemporary be to be marketing today,rather than being pitching software pitching software pitching softwarepitching software, it's so funny the way one just naturally rolls out into theother and we're both here. Several my team members are both consumers of thestuff that they put out in as well as being subscribers to the software aswell. I love that you took it there anything else you want to share about,like the large corporate standpoint like what are some of the challengesthat they're facing. I think the one big thing that that I took note ofalready is that the market has changed on them and that they are now direct toconsumers a consequence or more often than before. I obviously they still useretail, but anything else going on for like someone, that's in a large brandor large company that should be on the radar yeah. So one of my favoritepieces of content out there is something was done by StanfordUniversity, actually that Aaron Leevy who's, one of the you ow the founder ofbox. He did a class along with another colleague that was called theindustrialist dilemma and you can go watch all the videos they put all thecontent up online for it and what I love about that whole premis is. Itplays off, obviously the innovator...

...dilemma and talking about the strugglefor love the fortune. Five hundred today is that the very things that gavethem their competiment vantage over the last few decades or now a liability forthem in a world of six IGMA. You got your factories to be at this perfectbalance line of profitability, and you had all these other things that went toperfection, but when the business that you're in changes, what do you actuallydo with those historical things that once gave you an advantage? You takeyou K, what's happened in the world of shaving, it wasn't. The Gillette densee dollar shape club comic. It was they couldn't go in until Walmart, heyby the way, we're going to launch something that competes directlyagainst you. So those relationships become a liability. And what do you dowith hat and that's kind of at the heart of what I wrote about inpredicting the turn and the work I'm doing with the podcast is: How can youone address? That fact realize it's happening and then do something aboutit? How can you go practice and learn from this world of innomation and thenbringhimg the bring that learning back into your hallways and for me, it'spracticing this concept of market intelligence. That gives you theability to see the how and when the future of your industry is going tohappen by being externally, focused an learning from what's happening withventure and with startups and everything else across the board. Whatare a couple ways that someone gets so so it's one thing to see these trendsand do identify them recognize your own liabilities. How are how is like a youknow, a thousand person or ten thousand or even Hundred Thousand PersonOrganization? How do they kind of make that turn? Are they startingessentially doing startups inside the larger organization, giving themfreedom to explore and learn in a practical way like? What have you seenor heard around that yeah practical sandpoint yeah, I mean there's dozensof models that you can look at and not one is ever going to be the right thing.You need to do a little bit of all of them, but a few that I personallyreally love. So one is corporate venture capital. One of the reasons Ilove corporate DC is, I think, a lot of people try and Getin corporate VC. Forthe same reason a VC gets into it, which is the financial retards. That'sactually the least valuable thing for corporate DC. You need to do it. Youneed to make a good return on capital and everything else, but the amazingthing about a venture capitalist is every single day. They have dozens of people walking into theirdoors and telling them where the future is headed and a great investor is ableto see all those things have their own thesis of where they think the world isheaded, but combine that with breadth and depth and pattern recognition ofI'm hearing this this and this. I think...

...that means something to my business anda corporate VC is a great way to be able to do that, to bring that in, tolearn from it and not just look for dealflow and good investments, butactually uses as market intelligence. For Your Business, so that's one thingthat I love that I think a lot of you know nearly every corporation shouldhave their an effort in that space. The second one is involvement in thestartup community, because corporate VC, while supervaluable, youonly will catch a company at that moment that they're looking forinvestment, so you might limit yourself if you're only doing that. So that'swhy you need o get involved with a lot of different versions of startupengagement and that startup engagement can be partnerships. It can beaccelerators. It can be any of those elements, but the mistake mostcorporations make. Is They pick one version of startup engagement and thatdoesn't give them anough brepth? You can't throw your name on a corporateaccelerator and said I'm seeing ten startup. So I've done everything youneed to get out there and do a lot more. So I'm at least of the belief thatgreat engagement in the startup world and the way to predict that turn is youhave to do every thing that you can and that means doing investment that meansdoing partnership. That means looking at launching your own efforts, and thatmight even mean acquisition and finding companies that you can bring into yourhalls as well love it. I just occurred to me, as, as you said, predicting theturn again for you. What is the tone yeah? So the turn is the moment whenbusiness changes, so the analogy I play off of is, if you play poker, the turnis that fourth card that comes out and if you're in the game at the the fourthcard coming down, you think you have a chance to win, and the thing where Iwatching right now in the world of business is there's some people sittingaround the table that don't realize they're actually playing a differentgame than they originally sat down with, and so the turn is that moment inbusiness and in the game of business where things change and you need to beanticipating what that change is going to be it's a great analogy, I'm glad Iask so shifting it just a little bit. You know I've heard and observed thatthat vcs are giving a higher multiple to companies with low shurn rates and,of course, highertention rates ind their clear customer experienceimplications. There is this something you've observed and are you doing anyadvising around what you know smaller younger companies can do out of the gate to be successful andget and get better multiples down the road yeah. So I mean the game of multiplesis always an interesting evolving one in the world adventure because it flowssomewhat in line with the public markets that as multiples change anddifferent metrics matter more or less you see that constant evolution. Sowhat I always encourage companies is,...

...you need to pay attention to yourmatrics, be super focused on your matrix, but you should be doingeverything about building a great business, not building a business basedon what multiple you help you're going to get, because we're not going to bein control of that. You know next year when, if the world of Martech somelaybecomes unattractive on Wall Street, doesn't matter what you did with turnrates or anything else you're going to see your metric blow up. You kn justask any of the poor adtat companies that went public three four years ago,how much they were out of their control in that, but with all of that, that'swhat our job is. Marketers is to figure out how to make the best metricspossible for our business and to really be driving to put ourselves in thedriver seat, because the the single biggest thing that will influence youknow later sage, investment, valuations or anything else is not needing venturecapital. If you don't need the money, because you've created a business thathas great metrics and maybe even as hit profitability because of those greatmetrics, if you don't need the money everyone's going to want to give youthe money right and that's our job, to kind of put yourself in those controls.So that's exactly why I've been doing you mentioned the title strategicconsultant. The work I've been doing since Livin, leaving wppand rockfish iswhat I call being a strategic marketing coach. So I'm not doing consulting init. What I'm doing is executive coaching in terms of how can marketersposition themselves the best way within an organization how to mentor and Coachand help you get there faster, because marketing is a thing that anybody canfigure it out. It's not something that requires a PhD, but it requires yourten tsand hours of practice and what I'm trying to help marketers do is gettheir ten thosand hours of practice a little bit quicker by stealing some ofthe hours that I've had at the Pligt love it. Since I have yau her since Iam a marketer and we have a lot of marketers listening as well, what areone or two or three common things that you see in that coaching opportunitiesfor growth or common errors or whatever like what are? What are a couple thingsthat you tend to speak to frequently in these engagements yeah? So I think thethe most common thing is what starts with talent, and it's amazing, howoften it comes down to that that great marketers hire other great barketersand where I've seen marketing organizations that have not beenrealizing. Their potential is generally where the marketing leader was, if theywere, they were hiring below their level, andwhy mean, by that was they were maybe not comfortable withsomething, and instead of hiring an a talent that would show how theirweakness and expose their weakness they...

...hired a B or a C player. That was maybeat parody with their weakness, and I don't think anybody does it maliciouslyor intentionally, but almost every single time, I've seen a weakness in amark that marketing team it comes down to that and on the flipside. Thoseorganizations. Theyare great is when a Marka realizes you can't do everything,and a great marketer is probably only actually going to be great in two orthree areas at best and weak in a lot more than that, and the great marketingteams are the ones where the marketing leader is comfortable enough with theirown skin that they say I am great at this, and I'm going to hire somebodybetter than me in this this and this area and what ends up happening is theentire team ends up elevating in a great place so that in pretty muchevery company I work with the ones that aren't hitting on all cylinders. Thatis the common cause and ninety eight percent of the situations. So I alwaysstart with that. One, the similar one to that is, I think, a fear of thinking. You have to build everythingyourself. There is a real value of tapping into expertise externally andusing that to your advantage, because you get credit for success, you don'tget credit for doing the work yourself, but I think a lot of marketers. We feellike we have to get credit for doing the work ourselves. So if you can gopull in a demand, GEN agency to help you for four or five months that getsyour foundation built built, get your marketing tack in a great place. Do ittake advantage of it? Don't spend the time to hire that person bring them onon board them like just go off and do it and that's something that I thinkwe're afraid at sometimes to do. But we don't have time as a startup. Your mostvaluable thing is executed, executing quickly to bring an experts to help.You hire great things when you can but bring in partners help you get thingsdone faster as well, and then I think the final thing that marketers kind ofmake a mistake is in not building up building up enough credibility withtheir peers and other functions. They put their head down and say I have XYZto accomplishin marketing and I'm going go off and go do it, but what youactually first need to do is figure out. Where can marketing help your peersacross the organization to do their job even better, so sit down with your peerover in sales, with your CEO with customer service go across that board,and how can you help them? Because if you have that give first mentality,that's going to pace maximum dividends for you later on down the road yeah thssuch great advice there, all three of those were fantastic. That last one isreally something I'm trying to explore...

...here on the show, because customerexperiences delivered in Park by all the people you mentioned and so in thecustomer looks different at different points based on what s Youre in in theorganization and so the more holistic view you can give yourself as amarketer and the more you can share your own understanding and point ofview with other people at other touchpoints. I think the better offwere all going to be the other interesting thing. There too isbridging one and two together the ability to hire that outside resourceor that outside talent, or that outside service is going to be much easier.When you have someone who is more expert in that topic area, you know toyour point of like hiring to compliment your weaknesses, as opposed to you know,hiring poorly to protect your strength or protect your ego, or you know allthose other things that we're not consciously doing, but we're doingwe're going to be able to contract, probbly contract and negotiate andevaluate that work in that partnership with a third party more effectively. Ifyou have someone who's more expert in that topic, area, Yep without doubt soat Bombom, here we are bootstrapped. You know we took some friends, indfamily money, early on we've been in and out of a couple debt deals, but youknow pretty much. The some of the primary owners of the company are inthe business every single day. Working here talk a little bit for people thatare that are at a point. You know, because we've looked at, we've lookedat obviously all the opportunities our CEOS phone rings regularly and getsemails unsolicited and solicited about opportunities. Talk about the kind ofthe prose and cons ind, the various like big buckets for someone that isn'tsuper familiar with ways to fund an operation and get it get a business toa healthy point. What are some pros and kinds of different ways to go yeah, soI think it really does depend on the company what your goals are and whatyou're looking to accomplish. The only reason to ever look at funding andwhether it's fundings, venture capital, friends and family debt rounds any ofthe different options out there. Funding should be about helping youaccomplish mile stones, and that needs to be the goal of any time. You evertake money because you know taking money, it's like getting a mortgage onyour house and we never go brag about how big of a mortgage we got when wepurchase a house yet a lot of times. We go raise money and we want to go bragabout how much money we raise and that's the wrong thing to be doing sowhenever you approach any sort of funding, it should be ecause. Thishelped me do a milestone, quicker, faster, better, etc and then know thatany of those models of funding will all c come with different things that theydictate from you. You know if you take a line of credit or venture debt. Well,that's something that has to be steadily repaid, and so you better havea consistent flow of cash. That's coming in to be able to do that,because if it takes you a little bit extra to get your product out orsomething else well, you still got to start paying back the interest on thatdebt, whether you like it or not. On...

...the flipside, you look at venturecapital. It's a little bit more patient, but it's only patient for so longbecause venture funds have to be, you know, usually they're, raising a tenyear venture fund. So they need you to repay that at some point as well, andthere will be pressures that come into that excetera, so with all of them,it's just being cognizant. What do you want to do? Is Your Business and thenwhat are the things that will happen with those different sources based onyour goal is, what's going to be the best way to go, often to do it? Thefinal thing I'll say on that is that realize that all money isn't createdequal either? I think the biggest mistake I see from startups in the latcases is when they do make the decision to go, raise money and when I say raise,I mean usually venture capital or private equity. They are optimizingbased on valuations and optimizing on valuation. Is the exact wrong thing todo? What you should be doing is optimizing about the people that willbe around the table and who will help you be successful to do that so findther the smartest people you can and raise money from them, because,hopefully, what you want is those that can help you do your business better,such good advice. I absolutely love what you offered there the money as itmeans to an end. You need to be clear on the end and in this case it'sachieving another milestone or two, and I would go out on a limb to say,because I've not been in that conversation before, but I go it on alimb to say your quarity on the answers to those questions of what are youtrying to get done here are going to be questions, Youre need to answer anyways,so you should be neler on that regardless and then the final offeringthere is that it's all about relationships and fit. I would say thata culture match is probably critical there like again more important thanthe multiple is the kind of the culture match who's there. What additionalintangible value are you gang get out of it besides? Just the financial ortransactional aspect of it, exactly good and so I'll. Just use that to rollright into to the question. I always like to ask here, as we wrap up becauserelationships are our number one core value? Can you think or mention someonewho's had a positive impact on your life for your career and give a mentionto a company that you think is doing customer experience and, and in thiscase branding I might have just been redundant there do doing that reallywell yeah. So the you know the first one I' kind of say from a thankyoustandpoint and somebody that's been a big impact. is a woman named Wendy LeeWendy is she was on the board of Directors or is on the Bord ofdirectors for Tech Stars, but we actually met when she was the cof getsasifaction, which was a great company in the y? U W the customer experiencebace back late, twosanod and when I was thinking about leaving PNG Wendy wasone of the people that I first sat down with and said. Here's what I'm thinkingabout! Here's why I wan accomplish- and she gave me amazing advice that I'vegiven to countless people after me,...

...which was you know, think about whereyou want to go in life and go one degree closer. Every time you make amove and she said every time I've seen somebody fall on their face. It'sbecause they're trying to jump to many degrees over and that's very tough todo, and so that's been amazing advice for me and it's something that I'veshared a lot and I've seen Wendy share a lot because she then, after getSasfaction, actually came here to Cincinneti for the last few years to beour co for Simperfuse, a great organization that we had here in town.That's doing really kind of fun things making him pact. And then you know toyour question about who's. Doing it doing it right I'll, actually bringback the example I'v Cheer Erler, which is, I do think. Terminus is one that,if you haven't studied it as a btob marketer and as a CCUSTOMER experienceprofessional, it's one you need to dive into and the reason I think it'sinteresting is there's a Montro, especially with somuch of Silkon Valley, being a driver of the startup world that you hear thewell. You need to hacker the Hustler and the designer as that Holy Trinityfor the Startup World, and what was fascinating with terminus is thatSangrum was one of the cofounders as the chief marketing officer and havinga marketer as that founding team member, especially for a company that was goingto be selling to marketers. You saw from day one they built the customerinto the heart and soul of what they were doing and there's so muchinspiration of. How can you do that from day, one that just will paydividends for a long long time? It's outstanding. I really love that youdouble down on that and look forward to sharing that feedback with him too. I'msure he'll appreciate that. Can you give people a few ways? Any wants to godeeper, learn more about the various projects that you're involved in checkout the podcast check out the book. What are some ways that people canfollow up with you yeah, so a few different ways. One is pretty much anysocial thing you can think of I'm at Dave Knox, so twitter linkein go godown the list all there. So, just at Dave Knox, all one word and thenpredicting the Turncom is my website that you can find all kinds ofinformation, whether it's about a link to the book to My podcast to the work Ido actually as a professional speaker with conferences and corporates or justwhat I'm doing from an exactive marketing coaching area. So any ofthose are a great place and always happy takan email at e day othatpredicting the turmcom excellent. I hope people take you up on that reallyreally great advice. You've seen a lot of stuff. You obviously have a veryintelligent, informed perspective, and I love that you continue to explore itthrough the podcast medium as well. You want to subscribe to predicting theturn or to the customer experience podcast. You can find either of them inApple, podcast, itunes, N, an all the other spots where you normally listento a podcasting. So much for this episode. Thank you date for your time.Thank you. Thank you for everything wou're doing with Bombom as well...

...clear communication, human connection,higher conversion. These are just some of the benefits of adding video to themessages your sending every day. It's easy to do with just a little guidanceto pick up the official book. Rehumonize your business, how personalvideos, accelerate sales and improve customer experience learn more in ordertoday at Bombamfcom book, that's Bo, MB, vombcom fuck, thanks for listening tothe customer experience. podcast remember the single most importantthing you can do today is to create and deliver a better experience for yourcustomers, continue learning the latest strategies and tactics by subscribingright now in your favorite podcast player, or visit Bombomcom podcast.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (165)