The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

47. Asking Better Sales Questions for Greater Sales Success w/ Brian Robinson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

“One question can change everything.”

Indeed, it can. On the latest episode of The Customer Experience Podcast, I have the pleasure of speaking with Brian Robinson, author of best-selling The Selling Formula and VP of Strategic Partnerships at Works24

Brian fills us in on:

  • His definition of great customer experience
  • How to adjust your mindset before entering a sales conversation
  • Why your questions are the main reason deals are closed or not
  • How to ask the best sales-related questions

Check out Brian’s #1 Best Seller on Amazon, The Selling Formula, for more expert advice.

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Because it's no longer a transactionalconversation, it's truly a orientation towards helping another human beingaccomplish their goals and become all that they are hoping to become. The single most important thing you cando today is to create and deliver a better experience for your customers,learn how sales, marketing and customer success experts create internalalignment, achieve desired outcomes and exceed customer expectations in apersonal and human way. This is the customer experience podcast, here'syour host, eath and beaute. You and your wife have eight children, Yesh Aand Havin to go or out of Lim and say that there's a sales tactic or strategythat you've learned in your professional career that makesparenting eight kids more manageable. Do you have a a great sales tactic thatapplies in the household yeah duct tape O I've? Just I'm married an incrediblewife. My wife Cindy is honestly one of the most awesome humans. I know she isin fantastic awesome, so hier or recruit. Well, is how translate thatinto right into a sales managers a parlance. So, let's talk about customerexperience when I say those words, what comes to mind for you, whill comes tomind. Immediately. Is the amount of touches that you make with a customer?I found that to be critical to maintaining the relationship such that,if anything happens, that's on the downside. They'll immediately feelcomfortable reaching out to you to talk about it as opposed to those touchesthat occur. Maybe once a year in an industry where you renew businessevery year or two or three, and if you're not making consistent touches inbetween those renewal cycles, you really put yourself at disadvantage. Ibelieve and they're more open to look at competing options if they don't havethat relationship in the continual contact really great thoughts there and somereally important words this this sting and touch regularly in order to beavailable right. This makes me think of phrase. Visibility beats ability. Youknow if your top of mind or you're available to me that is going to beatout someone that may actually be more competent or more available an the moreyou can build relationship. Of course, there's that's also a very stickycomponent of it. Where have you seen that go right or wrong? What are sometrouble spots? You've seen ore some easy go tos in order to stay in touchwith people in a relevant way, so that you're, not just shooting stuff out inorder to shoot stuff out and check the box. Well, the the specific instancesI'm referring to the business were in with our company works. Twenty four andour client service contacts make a touch every thirty days because we'retrying to keep our clients refreshed on...

...the content that they use with ourservice. We provide in lobby digital signage in a lot of lobbies around thecountry for banks and credit unions, as well as on hold messages and overheadmusic. So there's a great reason to reach out and keep things fresh andthat touch every thirty days helps accomplish that. The positive of thatis I mentioned, is people know they're getting touched, and it'sinteresting when I call a client and ask about and chat with them abouttheir renewal. They'll say: Oh my gosh, Yeah Kelly or whoever the clientservice contact is for them has been terrific. We appreciate her, buthonestly I haven't updated as much as I should and they start gettingapologetic, but they know we're doing our job and it makes the renewalopportunity a lot less challenging because of that right. It's this ideathat you, you know behind the scenes, your providing value, you're being aservice you're doing the things you say you're going to do, but I think it's really easy to just assumethat the customer knows that all that is happening and that you are actuallyyou know back theire, delivering value and these types of things, and so thatthat human to human roundup, you know, makes me think of like a Qbr or someother kind of like more formal reminder of hey. This is what we said we woulddo. This is where we said we would be. This is where we're going next andthose types of things. I think it's so easy to take for granted the idea that,of course, we're delivering a whole bunch of value. Why wouldn't the clientknow that immediately at all the time, yeah- and you know we're stuck insideour bottle and we're so used to hearing our own language that it's astonishingto me, how many of our clients over the years have reached out and said, Ididn't know You provided in lobby digital signage, in addition to onholdmessages. Are you kidding me? Well, that's how stuck inside ourselves wecan get and how critical the touches are. Yeah we wind up in the same situationwith aspects and features of our software. You know, for example, welaunch screen recording a few years back, and you know, even today we'resurprising some of our longtime customers with the fact that there'sanother record but right over there and they can record themselves in theirscreen. It's so funny how deep we can get in our own situation. So this is aninteresting combination by the way you know a lot of the Times on this showwere talking about. Well, software we've had a variety of tangibleproducts as well, but what you're doing with works? Twenty four in a you know,creating or providing some experiential aspects to a physical space. Inaddition to kind of the phone space talk a little bit about how the touchpoints that you're providing are integrated into a broader goal fora customer experience well with respect to client service and how we reach outto them. The goal here is to continually feednew ideas every month, new ways of touching the customer through examplesof new video clips, we've built or NEU on hold messages. We've created for ourglobal libraries that are oriented to...

...that particular market and what it doesis it. It continually prompts our client to take a look at what am Idoing now, and could I tweak it? Could I use this instead and we also try tobe thematic with our content so that, if they haven't considered using atheme, for example, for a thirty day window, as opposed to touching one idea,just once how about using a theme and touch it multiple times in differentways, so it resonates with somebody who is thinking one way or another way. Butthe still the theme is the same and it'll eventually pull more leads infrom a crossselling perspective. Let's go into sales at a high level. You'veobviously learned a ton, you've taught a ton, you do coaching, you wrote abook. You engage in conversations like these all the time. One of the one ofthe notes that I noticed in prepping for this call was the role of mindset,talk a little bit about the role of mindset in sales success and maybe whatholds people back? I'm guessing. Those two are a little bit related mm.Definitely I really appreciate this question. Thethe mindset is something I think in my training years ago with Johnson andJohnson cocacola mindset was not even really touched on. It was all about theprocess all about the nuts and bolts the steps you take kind of how youhandle objections and that's all good, but what I found to be over time almostas important, if not more important than the actual conversation is sittingdown, and what I mentioned in the book is think about your prospect. Think aboutthe person you're about to talk with and start becoming very grateful forthem become very thankful for them. Thinkabout what they're experiencing, and I highly recommend you take them oe andjust pray for them, and what I does it put you in a state of serving ratherthan being self serving, and I really believe you telegraph that when you geton the phone with somebody when you walk in the office to sit down, theyhave a sense. They think we've kind of got a a radar in us that tells us thisperson's really for us or not really for ust theyre more for themselves.Yeah, I think you'r. What you're talking about is a different like this.This mindset difference is a difference that people can feel. This is so muchof that. You know I feel like the words human and authentic and some of theseother words even vulnerability, have kind of bubbled up into mainstream, ashas mindfulness, not Essari mindset as well. But a lot of these things havecome up and I think what we're trying to get at with all of this is thatthere's so much happening in a subconscious way in its ultimatelyabout human connection and relationship, and I don't mean relationship like Irecognize that guy's face, or I recognize her COMPANI's logo or thesekinds of things like the basics of...

...being in a very shallow definitionrelationship, but really truly connecting with people and that's stillso fundamental, as it always has been to success in sales and really any seatin the house. Is this a practical in the moment thing that you'rerecommending like before a caller before a meeting or Appe wit? When and how often do youreset the mindset before every single conversation? Sales conversation sitdown, take a take a moment or two literally takes about sixty seconds,and you go through that process of just calming yourself. Thinking about thatindividual and instead of focusing on the outcome, focus on the conversationand that person you're about to speak with and let's see if we can reallyhelp them. Let's ask the appropriate questions to uncover the needs thatmaybe they haven't even considered that our deeper, more emotional level needsthat can really touch and cause something to happen. It's really interesting because I thinkwhen you go that route, this kind of deeper level discovery with intention.It's not only a value to you as a salesperson in terms of understandingand helping move people closer to solutions, or you know, if you're anhonest type of person, maybe you're not the right solution for their situation,but, above all again going back to connection like you're guiding selfdiscovery in some cases in these situations, whether whether it's in asales ca, I've never been a formal salesperson quote a carrying typeSalesperson, but I've had similar. I'm imagining some of these personalexperiences that I've had, where you know, you're, sincerely askingquestions of a friend or a coworker or whatever, and out of natural curiosityand best hopes and intentions for them best outcomes, for maybe a situationthat they're in just you taking the time to be sincerely curious andinterested in what they're facing or what's holding them up in from apractical standpoint or an emotional standpoint or whatever. They appreciatethat so much, and I think, especially if you're early on in a sales situationand you're setting you're setting the tone and setting the table for alongterm business relationship and just a different way. I love yourrecommendation here. T appreciate that the I think one of the most importantpieces of advice I received- and this was after a full year of high levelprofessional sales training- was setting an agenda when you sit downwith your prospect and it's very simple. It sounds like this: Hey Ethan. WhatI'd like to do with your permission is just share the agenda for ourconversation, it's just three points. Is that okay? Well, who wouldn't sayyeah, that's okay, right! It also shows that you, you are to your point, you're,being intentional you've planned ahead and by the way I have questions, I'mready to ask you that I've prepared and...

I'm going to take notes on them and, Oh,my gosh, what a difference it makes when somebody sits down with a piece ofpaper that have has questions on it and they sit across from you and they startasking those questions you it's almost like a reporter asking you questions,you really want to give them your best answers and you're going to think aboutit. Heah there's a level of intention therethat shows respect for the other person in their time. Something else I noticedN in reading up on the work that you've done is selling phrases, and so, whileyou're there with this this angenda setting what are some key phrases, talkabout the power and the use of language as you've seen it be effective surethis has been an absolute game changer. For me, one of the most disarmingphrases is very simple. It's I'm just curious. You preface a question withthat, and people appreciate that you're justcurious, so I'm just curious. If I could provideyou with X, would that be of any value to you, one of the most powerful onesthat I have found is. Would you be opposed because most people's naturaltendency, as you know, is to say no, so if you're asking somebody, would yoube opposed when they say know what they're saying is yes right? No, I wouldn't be opposed. Thatmeans yes, so it's a little it's, but it's notit's not strange. When you ask it, it really makes a big difference. When yousay it, I've got a whole bunch of others, but those to pop and Oh andwith your permission, that's another, really powerful one. It shows a servant,mentality and a desire to care yeah. I think it shows pacing as well you'reletting them kind of guide it or control it. A little bit agreed yeah,that's really nice. So in your especially in your coaching talk alittle bit about some of the nature of your engagements as a sales coach. LikeAre you coaching teams? Are you like what is the situation there? Typicallyindividuals, and it's really just if they have a recording of their salesconversation. A good example of one walk through that look at how they'reusing their their process in the context of the five steps of theselling formula, and typically it's not just some radical problem. Usually it'ssomething in the front end. It's the questions that are being asked even theorder of the questions. It's it's not like there's a major problem, but ifyou can find through that, what I try to find is that one caviat that onething that can turn everything around and it's amazing how I'll get feedback,sometimes after those coaching sessions les say Brian. I asked that question atthe beginning or at the end, and it changed everything or I had a closingquestion. I never used to ask that now I ask, and now it's been dramatic, howwe've been able to close more deals. Talk about the sequencing there just goone layer deeper on that. How does...

...moving a question say from third orfourth up to first or from second or third to last? What is it about thesequencing there that produces such a dramatic change, yeah enll Ma give anexample from the book. If I may, I'm just eaing to read a sequence ofquestions day and to preface this the way that I recommend you build atquestions prior to Assales conversations very simple: take a pieceof paper and write down three columns or spreadsheet first column. You listout the features of the product of service. Your selling, the secondcolumn you list out each specific benefit related to that particularfeature. So there's typically multiple benefits, you're going to see in thesecond column, related to that single feature on the left. Thirdly, you writeout the questions that would relate to each individual benefit to elicit thatbenefit, so you're goint have multiple questions, and so what I've discoveredjust read this for you here. This is a very simple example, but let's say thatyou're selling premade home cook meals for two to six people. Okay, so one ofthe questions you would ask one of the benefits I'll say: First: Is it savesup to sixty minutes per meal, including food purchase, PREP AND COOKING TIME?Another benefit? Is You just pull it out of the freezer and put it in theoven? So here are the three questions you would ask and to your point, themost important question will be the third one I'm going to mention here andyou'll. See wine just a moment, question one. This is more kind ofhousekeeping kind of generic is on a weekly basis. How many dinners do youcook for your family, okay, question too? How much time does it typicallytake you to make a dinner for your family? Third, if you could just pull yourdinner out of the Freezer, already prepared, I and put it into the ovenwithout having to think about it, how would that affect the frequency of yourfamily meals? So what you've done right there as you've gone to the heart, thefamily you're, not just talking about product or service. Now, and I had agentleman I spoke with on a podcast actually, who also did video productionfull time and he was struggling with closing deals with real estate agents.He was working with to provide that type of service and he changed hisquestioning. He went about three or four levels deeper into the heart levelquestions. One of the key questions was: How would this affect time with yourfamily if we could get this video program up and running in your realestate business? And he said by the time he was finished discussing this,they were almost begging him to do business with him and it changedeverything he made his greatest sale. He ever made so couple things ere one. It obviouslyaffects the way the buyer thinks about the problem or the opportunity theythink about it differently. Now, right the there he has helped guide them intomaking it a much more personal and deep...

...issue where you thought. I just needsome videos to go on my listings and my social media and stuff right so, butthen also, I think so few people operate this way and you tell me Iwould guess that so few people operate this way that that's a just the factthat he thinks that way and allows the other person to experience this line ofthought about themselves is a significant differentiaor for it. It'shuge exactly because it's no longer a transactional conversation, it's trulya orientation towards helping another human being, accomplish their goals andbecome all that they are hoping to become now that may sound a little bitover the top. But the truth is we buy things because we want to be get betterat something or we want to improve our live. And if you go to that level, a lot ofit's emotional yeah, you your en, then we make up the reasons. Why exactly tofeel okay about it, yeah yeah we justify. Logically, the old addage webuy emotionally justifilogically, but emotionally is where the buying reallyhappens most of the time right and it's and it's interesting, I think the thelogic there, so we can explain it to our spouse or a friend or a CO workeror whatever, and so that it can make sense because, apparently we're notcomfortable, saying yeah, I just felt like it yeah truth be told Yeah. What is am Iasking too much? Could you go through the five steps for for instant salesimprovement? You know, I think, we've probably gotten by some of the mainideas that that relate to one or more of the steps, but you know so that thatwe don't miss this US watat. I don't miss this opportunity, while I have youon the show here, just to kind of run through them, and the key thing that'sinteresting to me here is instant, that in Anevar again. This is why I feellike you've, probably already spoken to some aspect of one or more of these, isthat a small change is going to yield a big and almost immediate changeinresult. So what do you mind running through those sure sure the first is toconnect with the prospect and set the agenda that step one? I spoke to Seidin the agendo. What that might sound like, and I've got scripts for all thisin the book. Secondly, is the interview and that's the QN, a obviously third isto present your solution after the interview and there's a critical point here,oftentimes people go in and present their solution without asking theappropriate questions and that's in my definition, showing up and throwing upthat's not really doing a good job of selling, so the interviewis criticalpresent your solution. Fourth, is providing your pricing and guaranteesand then finally closed the deal. It sounds very straight forward. It is,and the most important pieace is the one prior. So you've got to have step.One you've got to do step to three four...

...and five. Now, of course, you can goout of order, but it may cause an issue. So what I the the way I came up withthis process is, I just was journaling. I do quite a bit ofjournaling just to kind of get my thoughts out on paper and I wasjournaling one day and I started to think what what have I done. That'sconsistent in my selling process over the years with various companies ETCEA,and it came down to these five steps and I had a kind of a Eureka moment.I'm like Gosh, if I could share this with other people, and they could justwalk through these steps and benefit from this it could it could cut theirselling learning curve in half and that has actually been happening with people.Tho have been applying this some pretty exciting. What is it about thatframework that tends to be so productive for four people and Ls thesame thing? Another way, what are some of the common selling challenges orfailures that this immediately will help kind of get back on track? It goes back to the theme of thequestions you ask: Can have a dramatic impact on the results of your salesconversations, so it's it's instead of just flying by the seat of your pantsand going with your training about your product or service, it's really lookingto the beginning of your conversation and setting the stage appropriatelywith your mindset. First, then, with taking a lot of time to really think tothe questions, and if you focus on the questions, if that's your primary aim,it can dramatically shift the outcome of your sales conversation when I thinkthe way when you do transition to the product or the service after theinquiry, you're, obviously in much better shape to map it to how thisperson might actually use it to have some usecases top of mind, someexamples of other people that have been in similar situations or have similarneeds or challenges or similar. Absolutely and that's where the use ofstories can become very effective because you're not telling them you're,actually sharing a third party example, social proof and that digests and is much easier toswallow than a straight well. This is what happens and here's. Why, and thisis why you should buy our product sure. Are there any variations or extratips or recommendations or cautions in working? These steps face to face andphysically in person versus doing it over the phone or remotely love thatquestion they're they're identical the steps. The reason I built this actuallycame to the forefront of my thinking was, I was forced to get off the road.I I spent about a thousand fifteen hundred miles a week, cold, callingbanks and credit unions years ago N, when I was helping to start this and mywife who at the time, was pregnant with...

...twins and we had six children already. Yes, I know what causes that had neededme home, and so I had to figure out a way to get off the road and thisprocess. I it caused me to codify what I was doingand it worked on the phone. It was dramatic again the result that occurredbecause of it sure specific strategies, I'm going to say some some words that are going to stiremotion for a large number of sales people, any specific strategies toreduce er, eliminate cold calling, yes, one, that's been very effective for US-has been a direct male approach to a landing page and that actually got meoff the road. So I've got a pdf that your listeners can download it. BrianRobinson Dot me it's the same URL for my book, the selling formula and it'sthe approach very simply is pick your target, get a male list and test. It create a letter very simple, directletter asking a very simple question with the web address that ties to amajor need that you're trying to fulfil and have a short video on that landing pagewith the very simple straightforward option of what they can do to respondand that's it and we generally get that minimum five to one we've had as highas twenty to one return on our mailings with that approach. That is asignificant, significant return. I'm going to ask so this one of the themesof the show is alignment. I think our organizations would all be much moreeffective if we were working with greater alignment intention and holismacross the various teams. Typically Marketing Sales Customer SupportCustomer Service customer success all in service of the customer as the asthe unifying point of focus, so is someone who is obviously your directmale recommendation there landing page with a video made, be think about. Ofcourse your marketing mind as well, what do you wish more sales people knewor understood about the marketing process? I feel like if you can ask a question that will pique the curiosity. That is ninety percent of the challengein getting somebody to engage with you. So it's kind of the two am question: Ifyou can kind of enter the mind of your prospect with what they're wrestlingwith a two, am that really can make a difference in your marketing efforts byasking that type of question so- and I can tell you most of myprospects, weren't olying awake in bed wondering what they're going to have onhold at two am right, but...

...we're able to create a question thatresonated with them and gave them enough interest to jump online and lookat the video. It's just questions again. I my own personal kind of Monterosquestions out of the key to life and one question could change everythingfor you. That's a write down by the way questions are the key to life and thatone question can change everything I'll flip that a little bit you know, you'veobviously worked with marketing folks. What do you think marketing folks?Maybe don't understand or misunderstand about sales people or the sales process?That's TA loaded question: It's I've asked this sales to marketingmarketing, to sales sales, to CS CS, to sales and even named an episode. Is Your salesteam hurting customer success based on the answers there and- and I theseconversations don't really happen. You know like this sales people go off tolunch or sit over in the room or be in a meeting and the marketing people, andyou know it's just you really easy to clusterand sat so I like to knock down some of the common myths and misconceptions andcreate some shared understanding through the question. So they are alittle bit loaded, but I feel like it's a tough conversation, and so we tend toavoid it well and you're right. It gets avoided, that's the biggest problem andin my experience with Corporate America, we would get a SA sales team, forexample, with Johnson and Johnson. We have had terrific terrific people inall areas of the company. The challenge was, in my experience that, for example,in the marketing side with Jane J, one of the divisions I was in was calledAfican Ando surger. We sold devices that were used by surgeons and surgeryto help with bary sections. All kinds ofthings like that and product would come out. They would give us the talkingpoints which is great, but then the reality would start to set in aboutwhat really mattered when we were out in the field and what happened in termsof that disconnect is oftentimes. The talking points wouldn't get revised toreflect the reality of what was really happening in the field. Therefore, thesalespeople that came on later or that were starting to move into that productand sell it more weren't getting the best information possible in order tosell that product quickly. They had to struggle through the same learning cuwwhen that curve could have been cut big time because they had the right talkingpoints, and it goes back to the communication. Like you stated, ifmarketing sales can truly sit down and have that conversation and sales goesout and tests things for marketing and then marketing says you know whatyou're right. We don't need these points. We need to shift this. We needto flip it that could make the learning curvereally quick and change a lot for the sales outcome.Yeah. I think that feedback loop is really really important. Obviously youknow you do all your research, you maybe do some customer interviews orprospect interviews, you buithe...

...marketing material, you put it out tomarket, but then the sales people are out there. You know actually working itdirectly and so that feedback loop, even if it's just in the first two orthree months, andto your point to revise to update to refine. Obviously,if you could keep it as an ongoing iterative process, it we on Herye justget better and better and better and better, but at least a ninety day, loopback, where you get some of the top struggles and opportunities and missedpoints etce, because the prep work in advance is helpful, but it's nothingquite like actually going out and talking to the real people, making thereal decisions with the real money, that's right and if you're n marketing,you know that unless you get some real hard feedback, you're living inside ofa vacuum and that's not going to ultimately Agli sell anything else,anything more, I should say unless you're getting feed back directly sureBrian. This has been great. I have two questions I always close with, butbefore I get there is there anything that you've learned or taught over thepast several years that we didn't cover today? That you think would just be areally good takeaway for folks listening yeah. I think if I couldstand on a mountaintop and yell this you just have to come over to Colorado.This is true. It won't happen in Oklahoma. There's two two words that Ifound to be essential: I've. Let Me Prefaceis by saying I'm looking at abookcase in my office here, I've got a ton of books, I've implemented, maybeone percent of the information in those books and the greatest growth I've personallyexperienced is by doing this embracing struggle and struggles, not a bad thing.I think struggle is the most important thing we can experience to go to thenext level, but we're not willing, because of the desire for comfort, todo that as readily as we might think we are so, I would say, be willing to embracestruggle and just let that wash over you let it do its work and I thinkyou'll see how quickly you can grow if you ally yourself that experience such great advice, I'm really glad. Iask that I feel, like you're wealth of wisdom and experience, and I just wanted to get one more nuggetthere. I'm glad I asked so relationships are our number one corevalue here at Bombam and here on the customer experience podcast. So Ialways like to close by giving you the chance to thank or mention someonewho's had a positive impact on your life or your career, and your wife hasalready been mentioned as one of the finest humans walking among us and foryou to have the opportunity to give a mention to a company that you thinkdelivers a great experience for you. As a customer yeah Joe Polish has hadprobably one of the greatest impacts on my life years ago. I listened to his CDseries at the time called Perona Marketing and the one idea that allowedme eventually to get off the road...

...completely was the idea, O freerecorded messages, and I sent Joe a letter. This is an interesting story. Isent Joe Letter, he gets hundreds and hundreds of letters, and I told thimabout my family how much it changed my life and he one day, I'm sitting myoffice. I get a call on his Joe Polish on the phone I'm like Joe. What's goingon, he said Brian. I got your letter and I never. I rarely call people, butit really touched me, and at was interesting, is I was out in Arizonawhere his offices, several months later, with my wife at a convention, and Iasked if I could come by and connect with him, and he let me and I actuallysold him our service and he's been in the client ever since that's great, it's kind of a miracle really well, it's that again, just the ideathat you would sit down, write a letter, I'm sure it was well written. I'm sureit was sincere and I would say to I don't know how long ago that was, but Iwould say today that tha the time and attention that we give other people isis an even more precious gift, I think than ever, because we all findourselves so harried and hered, and all these other things- and I don't thinkenough people, so I think your recommendations, just in the salesprocess or so meaningful, is that we can create these moments for peoplethrough our time and attention that are just that did just break through hey. Idon't normally call people on the phone hey, I don't norrally host people at myoffice, but I'm going to do both of those things, because you showed meBrian now, I'm Joe in the scenario that you see me and you hear made youunderstand me and that you value me and that's I mean deep down. That's all anyof us wants that is connection. How about a company that you that youreally like ar respect for the way that they serve you as a customer, BombamAwesomes, your service and I've reached out a few times when Igot going about a year ago and your team is fantastic. I feel out of anycompany. I've worked with and you didn't you didn't tell me to say any ofthis, so I'm just telling you Ethan I've been very impressed with how youportray yourselves and it's no lie. It's honest. It's sincere and I love it,love your service that is so kind I had't kno. I would have taken thisconversation a whole different direction. I wouldn't have that. That's reallykind. I appreciate that so much. I think you know we try to hire well, wetry to be maintain, especially in that probablythe customer support customer success. Team you're talking about you, knowthey're often times dealing with people who are confused or frustrated all daylong, and so you know we go to some special efforts to make sure that thateveryone's appreciating that each customer is appreciated and that we tryto meet them where they are. You know, even if it is a point of confusion orfrustration, so that's awesome feedback. I look forward to sharing that with theteam, because, like that letter, you wrote Joe It's that kind of feedbackthat really is going to get someone through a day or let them know thatthey really made a difference. So I...

...appreciate that so much in Du and againto be clear for the listener totally unsolicited. I wish I knew that's awesome. BrianAgain, this has been great. I really appreciate your time so much. How cansomeone follow up and connect with you offer that you are all ones but feelfree to share that again, Anga and any other links or places you might sendpeople to follow up on any of these ideas. Sure two things. First, I've gota gift for your listeners, the first three chapters of my book, the sellingformula on audible. They can go to Brian Robinson, bookcom, Brian Robi, anson bookcom and download the chapters there and you can hop on Amazon and getthe book again. The selling formula. That's awesome, continued success toyou, Brian, and just really appreciate your time. So much. Thank you for thekind of words and thank you for your thoughtful approach to connecting withpeople and being a value thanks. Ethan 's been a true honor. I appreciate itclear communication, human connection, higher conversion. These are just someof the benefits of adding video to the messages your sending every day. It'seasy to do with just a little guidance, so pick up the official book rehumanizeYour Business, how personal videos, accelerate sales and improve customerexperience learn more in order today at Bombam Com Bock, that's Bo, mb, bomvcomfuck, thanks for listening to the customer experience. podcast rememberthe single most important thing you can do today is to create and deliver abetter experience for your customers, continue learning the latest strategiesand tactics by subscribing right now in your favorite podcast player, or visitBombomcom podcast.

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