The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

47. Asking Better Sales Questions for Greater Sales Success w/ Brian Robinson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

“One question can change everything.”

Indeed, it can. On the latest episode of The Customer Experience Podcast, I have the pleasure of speaking with Brian Robinson, author of best-selling The Selling Formula and VP of Strategic Partnerships at Works24

Brian fills us in on:

  • His definition of great customer experience
  • How to adjust your mindset before entering a sales conversation
  • Why your questions are the main reason deals are closed or not
  • How to ask the best sales-related questions

Check out Brian’s #1 Best Seller on Amazon, The Selling Formula, for more expert advice.

Get more from The Customer Experience Podcast!

Subscribe (and leave a rating or review):

Because it's no longer a transactional conversation. It's truly a orientation towards helping another human being accomplished their goals and becomeall that they are hoping to become. The single most important thing you cando today is to create and deliver a better experience for your customers. Learnhow sales, marketing and customer success experts create internal alignment, achieved desired outcomesand exceed customer expectations in a personal and human way. This is the customerexperience podcast. Here's your host, Ethan Butte. You and your wife haveeight children. Yes, and having to go on out of limb and saythat there's a sales tactic or strategy that you've learned in your professional career thatmakes parenting eight kids more manageable. Do you have a great sales tactic thatapplies in the household? Yeah, duct tape. Okay, I've just I'mmarried an incredible wife. My wife, Cindy, is honestly one of themost awesome humans I know. She is and fantastic, awesome. So hireor recruit. Well, is how translate that into it right into a salesmanager's parlance. So let's talk about customer experience, when I see those words, what comes to mind for you? What comes to mind immediately is theamount of touches that you make with a customer. I found that to becritical to maintaining the relationship such that if anything happens that's on the downside,they'll immediately feel comfortable reaching out to you to talk about it, as opposedto those touches that occur maybe once a year. In an industry where yourenew business every year or two or three, and if you're not making consistent touchesin between those renewal cycles, you really put yourself at disadvantage, Ibelieve, and they're more open to look at competing options if they don't havethat relationship and the continual contact. Really great thoughts there in some really importantwords. This this sting and touch regularly in order to be available right.This makes me think of a phrase visibility beats ability. You know, ifyour top of mind or you're available to me, that is going to beatout someone that may actually be more competent or more available in the more youcan build relationship. Of course there's that's also a very sticky component of it. Where have you seen that go right or wrong? What are some troublespots you've seen or some easy go to say in order to stay in touchwith people in a relevant way so that you're not just shooting stuff out inorder to shoot stuff out and check the box. Well, the the specificinstances I'm referring to or the business were in with, our company works twentyfour and our client service contacts make a touch every thirty days because we're tryingto keep our clients refreshed on the content...

...that they use with our service.We provide in lobby digital signage in a lot of lobbies around the country forbanks and credit unions, as well as onhold messages and overhead music. Sothere's a great reason to reach out and keep things fresh and that touch everythirty days helps accomplish that. The positive of that, as I mentioned,is people know they're getting touched and it's interesting when I call a client andask about and chat with them about their renewal, they'll say, oh mygosh, yeah, Kelly or whoever the client service contact is for them hasbeen terrific. We appreciate her, but honestly I haven't updated as much asI should and they start getting apologetic, but they know we're doing our joband it makes the renewal opportunity a lot less challenging because of that. Right. It's this idea that you, you know, behind the scenes you're providingvalue, you're being at service, you're doing the things you say you're goingto do. But I think it's really easy to just assume that the customerknows that all that is happening and that you are actually, you know,back their delivering value in these types of things, and so that that humanto human round up. You know, it makes me think of like aQbr some other kind of like more formal reminder of Hey, this is whatwe said we would do, this is where we said we would be,this is where we're going next, and those types of things. I thinkit's so easy to take for granted the idea that, of course we're deliveringa whole bunch of value. I wouldn't the client know that immediately at allthe time? Yeah, and you know, we're stuck inside our bottle and we'reso used to hearing our own language that it's astonishing to me how manyof our clients over the years of reached out and said, I didn't knowYou provided in lobby digital signage in addition to onhold messages. Are you kiddingme? Well, that's how stuck inside ourselves we can get and how criticalthe touches are. Yeah, we wind up in the same situation with aspectsand features of our software. You know, for example, we launch screen recordinga few years back and you know, even today we're surprising some of ourlongtime customers with the fact that there's another record button right over there andthey can record themselves in their screen. It's so funny how deep we canget in our own situation. So this is an interesting combination. By theway, you know, a lot of the Times on this show we're talkingabout well, software. We've had a variety of tangible products as well,but what you're doing with works twenty four in a you know, creating orproviding some experiential aspects to a physical space in addition to kind of the phonespace. Talk a little bit about how the touch points that you're providing areintegrated into a broader goal for a customer experience. Well, with respect toclients service and how we reach out to them. The goal here is tocontinue really feed new ideas every month, new ways of touching the customer throughexamples of new video clips we've built or Nuan hold messages we've created for ourglobal libraries that are oriented to that particular...

...market. And what it does isit it continually prompts our client to take a look at what am I doingnow and could I tweak it? Could I use this instead? And wealso try to be thematic with our content so that if they haven't considered usinga theme, for example, for a thirty day window, as opposed totouching one idea just once, how about using a theme and touch it multipletimes in different ways so it resonates with somebody who is thinking one way oranother way, but the still the theme is the same and it'll eventually pullmore leads in from a cross selling perspective. Let's go into sales at a highlevel. You've obviously learned a ton. You've taught a ton. You docoaching, you wrote a book, you engaging conversations like these all thetime. One of the one of the notes that I noticed in in preppingfor this call was the roll of mindset. Talk a little bit about the roleof mindset in sales. Success and maybe what holds people back. I'mguessing those two are a little bit related. MMM, definitely. I really appreciatethis question. The the mindset is something I think and my training yearsago with Johnson and Johnson Coca Cola mindset was not even really touched on.It was all about the process, all about the nuts and bolts, thesteps you take, kind of how you handle objections, and that's all good, but what I found to be over time, almost as important, ifnot more important, than the actual conversation, is sitting down, and what Imentioned in the book is think about your prospect, think about the personyou're about to talk with and start becoming very grateful for them. Become verythankful for them, think about what they're experiencing and I highly recommend you takea moment and just pray for them. And what does it puts you ina state of serving rather than being self serving, and I really believe youtelegraph that when you get on the phone with somebody, when you walk inthe office to sit down. They have a sense. I think we've kindof got a radar in us that tells us this person's really for us ornot really for us. They're more for themselves. Yeah, I think you'rewhat you're talking about is a different like this, this mindset difference is adifference that people can feel. This is so much of that. You know, I feel like the words human and authentic and some of these other words, even vulnerability, of kind of bubbled up into mainstream, as has mindfulnessand not a certain mindset as well. But a lot of these things havecome up and I think what we're trying to get at with all of thisis that there's so much happening in a subconscious way and it's ultimately about humanconnection and relationship. And I don't mean relationship like I recognize that guy's faceor I recognize her company's logo or these kinds of things, like the basicsof of being in a very shallow definition...

...relationship, but really truly connecting withpeople, and that's still so fundamental, as it always has been, tosuccess in sales and really any seat in the house. Is this a practical, in the moment thing that you're recommending, like before a call or before ameeting or a polutely? When? When and how often do you resetthe mindset? MMM, before every single conversation sales conversation, sit down,take a take a moment or two. Literally takes about sixty seconds, andyou go through that process of just calming yourself, thinking about that individual and, instead of focusing on the outcome, focus on the conversation and that personyou're about to speak with and let's see if we can really help them.Let's ask the appropriate questions to uncover the needs that maybe they haven't even considered, that our deeper, more emotional level needs that can really touch and causesomething to happen. It's really interesting because I think when you go that route, this kind of deeper level discovery with intention, it's not only a valueto you as a salesperson in terms of understanding and helping move people closer tosolutions or, you know, if you're an honest type of person, maybeyou're not the right solution for their situation. But above all, again going backto connection, like your guiding selfdiscovery in some cases in these situations,whether whether it's in a sales kind. I've never been a formal salesperson,quota carrying type salesperson, but I've had similar I'm imagining some of these personalexperiences that I've had where you know you're sincerely asking questions of a friend ora CO worker or whatever and out of natural curiosity and best hopes and intentionsfor them, best outcomes for maybe a situation that they're in, just youtaking the time to be sincerely curious and interested in what they're facing or what'sholding them up in it, from a practical standpoint or an emotional standpoint orwhatever. They appreciate that so much and I think especially if you're early onin a sales situation and you're setting you're setting the tone and setting the tablefor a long term business relationship and just a different way. I love yourrecommendation here. Well, appreciate that. The I think one of the mostimportant pieces of advice I received, and this was after a full year ofhigh level professional sales training, was setting an agenda when you sit down withyour prospect and it's very simple. It sounds like this. Hey, Ethan, what I'd like to do, with your permission, is just share theagenda for our conversation. It's just three points. Is that okay? Well, who wouldn't say? Yeah, that's okay right. It also shows thatyou you are to your point, you're being intentional. You've planned ahead and, by the way, I have questions I'm ready to ask you that I'veprepared and I'm going to take notes on...

...them. And, oh my gosh, what a difference it makes when somebody sits down with a piece of paperthat have has questions on it and they sit across from you and they startasking those questions you. It's almost like a reporter asking you questions. Youreally want to give them your best answers and you're going to think about it. Yeah, there's a level of intention there that shows respect for the otherperson in their time. Something else I noticed in reading up on the workthat you've done is selling phrases. And so while you're there with this thisangenda setting, what are some key phrases? Talk about the power and the useof language, as you've seen it be effective. Sure this has beenan absolute game changer for me. One of the most this arming phrases isvery simple. It's I'm just curious. You preface a question with that andpeople appreciate that you're just curious. So I'm just curious if I could provideyou with X. would that be of any value to you? One ofthe most powerful ones that I have found is would you be opposed? Becausemost people's natural tendency is, you know, is to say no. So ifyou're asking somebody, would you be opposed? When they say no,what they're saying is yes, right, no, I wouldn't be opposed.That means yes. So it's a little it's but it's not. It's notstrange. When you ask it, it really makes a big difference when yousay it. I've got a whole bunch of others, but those two pop. And Oh and with your permission. That's another really powerful one. Itshows a servant mentality and a desire to care. Yeah, I think itshows a pacing as well. You're letting them kind of guide it or controlit a little bit. Agreed. Yeah, that's really nice. So in yourespecially in your coaching, talk a little bit about some of the natureof your engagements as a sales coach. Like, Are you coaching teams?Are you like what is the situation there? Typically individuals and it's really just ifthey have a recording of their sales conversation and a good example of one, walk through that look at how they're using their their process in the contextof the five steps of the selling formula. And typically it's not just some radicalproblem. Usually it's something in the front end. It's the questions thatare being asked, even the order of the questions. It's it's not likethere's a major problem, but if you can find through that, what Itry to find is that one of Yat that one thing that can turn everythingaround. And it's amazing how I'll get feedback sometimes after those coaching sessions.Let's say, Brian, I ask that question at the beginning or at theend and it changed everything. Or I had a closing question. I neverused to ask that. Now I ask and now it's been dramatic how we'vebeen able to close more deals. Talk about the sequencing there. Just goone layer deeper on that. How does...

...moving a question, say, fromthird or fourth up to first, or from second or third to last?What is it about the sequencing there that that produces such a dramatic change?Yeah, it'll me give you an example from the book, if I may. I'm just going to read a sequence of questions day and to preface this, the way that I recommend you build that questions prior to a sales conversationsvery simple. Take a piece of paper and write down three columns or spreadsheet. First Column You list out the features of the product or service you're selling. The second column You'd list out each specific benefit related to that particular feature. So there's typically multiple benefits you're going to see in the second column relatedto that single feature on the left. Thirdly, you write out the questionsthat would relate to each individual benefit to elicit that benefit. So you're goingto have multiple questions and so what I've discovered. Just read this for youhere. This is a very simple example. But let's say that you're selling premadehome cook meals for two to six people. Okay, so one ofthe questions you would ask. One of the benefits, I'll say first,is it saves up to sixty minutes per meal, including food purchase, prepand cooking time. Another benefit is you just pull it out of the freezerand put it in the oven. So here are the three questions you wouldask and to your point, the most important question will be the third one. I'm going to mention here and you'll see wine just a moment. Questionone, this is more kind of housekeeping, kind of generic, is on aweekly basis how many dinners do you cook for your family? Okay,question to how much time does it typically take you to make a dinner foryour family? Third, if you could just pull your dinner out of thefreezer already prepared and put it into the oven without having to think about it, how would that effect the frequency of your family meals? So what you'vedone right there as you've gone to the heart the family. You're not justtalking about product or service now and I had a gentleman I spoke with ona podcast actually, who also did video production full time and he was strugglingwith closing deals with real estate agents he was working with to provide that typeof service and he changed his questioning. He went about three or four levelsdeeper into the heart level questions. One of the key questions was how wouldthis affect time with your family? Only if we could get this video programup and running in your real estate business. And he said by the time hewas finished discussing this, they were almost begging him to do business withhim and it changed everything. He made his greatest sale he ever made.So couple things are one it obviously affects the way the buyer thinks about theproblem or the opportunity. They think about it differently now, right. Theythere. He is helped guide them into making it a much more personal anddeep issue, where you thought I just...

...need some videos to go on mylistings in my social media and stuff. Right so. But then also,I think so few people operate this way, and you tell me, I wouldguess that so few people operate this way that that's a just the factthat he thinks that way and allows the other person to experience this line ofthought about themselves is a significant differentiator for it. It's huge exactly because it'sno longer a transactional conversation. It's truly a orientation towards helping another human beingaccomplish their goals and become all that they are hoping to become. Now,that may sound a little bit over the top, but the truth is webuy things because we want to be get better at something or we want toimprove our life. And if you go to that level, a lot ofits emotional. Yeah, you, and you're then we the it. Thenwe make up the reasons why exactly to feel okay about it. Yeah,yeah, we justify logically the old adage we buy emotionally justify logically, butemotionally is where the buying really happens most of the time, right, andit's in it's interesting, I think, the the logic there so we canexplain it to our spouse or our friend or a CO worker or whatever,and so that it can make sense, because apparently we're not comfortable saying yeah, I just felt like it. Yeah, truth be told. Yeah, weis. Am I asking too much? Could you go through the five stepsfor for instant sales improvement? I you know, I think we've probablygotten by some of the main ideas that that relate to one or more ofthe steps, but you know, so that that we don't miss this eye. Well said, I don't miss this opportunity while I have you on theshow here, just to kind of run through them. And the key thingthat's interesting to me here is instant. That in you've are again. Thisis why I feel like you've probably already spoken to some aspect of one ormore of these, is that a small change is going to yield a bigand almost immediate changing results. So we do you mind running through those?Sure? Sure. The first is to connect with the prospect and set theagenda. That step one. I spoke to set in the agenda what thatmight sound like and I've got scripts for all this in the book. Secondlyis the interview, and that's the Q Anda, obviously. Third is topresent your solution after the interview, and this a critical point here. Oftentimespeople go in and present their solution without asking the appropriate questions and that's,in my definition, showing up and throwing up. That's not really doing agood job of selling. So the interviews critical. Present your solution. Fourthis providing your pricing and guarantees and then finally close the deal. It soundsvery straightforward. It is, and the most important piece is the one priorso you've got to have step one, you've got to do step two,three, four and five. Now,...

...of course you can go out oforder, but it may cause an issue. So what I read. The wayI came up with this process is I just was journaling. I doquite a bit of journaling just to kind of get my thoughts out on paper, and I was journaling one day and I started to think, what,what have I done that's consistent in my selling process over the years with variouscompanies, etc. And it came down to these five steps and I hada kind of a Eureka moment. I'm like, Gosh, if I couldshare this with other people and they could just walk through these steps and benefitfrom this, it could it could cut their selling learning curve and half,and that has actually been happening with people that have been applying this. Sopretty exciting. What is it about that framework that tends to be so productivefor for people in ls the same another way, what are some of thecommon selling challenges or failures that this immediately will help kind of get back ontrack? It goes back to the theme of the questions you ask can havea dramatic impact on the results of your sales conversations. So it's it's insteadof just flying by the seat of your pants and going with your training aboutyour product or service, it's really looking to the beginning of your conversation andsetting the stage appropriately with your mindset first, then with taking a lot of timeto really think through the questions. And if you focus on the questions, if that's your primary aim, it can dramatically shift the outcome of yoursales conversation. When I think the way that when you do transition to theproduct or the service. After the inquiry you're obviously in much better shape tomap it to how this person might actually use it, to have some usecases top of mind, some examples of other people that have been in similarsituations or have similar needs or challenges or similar absolutely. And that's where theuse of stories can become very effective, because you're not telling them, you'reactually sharing a third party example, social proof, and that digests and asmuch easier to swallow then a straight well, this is what happens and here's why, and this is why you should buy our product. Sure, arethere any variations or extra tips or recommendations or cautions in working these steps facetofaceand physically in person versus doing it over the phone or remotely? Love thatquestion. They're they're identical the steps. The reason I built this actually cameto the forefront of my thinking was I was forced to get off the road. I spent about a thousand five hundred miles a week cold calling banks andcredit unions years ago when I was helping to start this and my wife,who at the time was pregnant with twins...

...and we had six children already.Yes, I know what causes that had needed me home, and so Ihad to figure out a way to get off the road and this process it. It caused me to codify what I was doing and it worked on thephone. It was dramatic again, the result that occurred because of it.Sure, specific strategies? I'm going to say some some words that are goingto stir emotion for a large number of salespeople. Any specific strategies to reduceor eliminate cold calling? Yes, one that's been very effective for us hasbeen a direct mail approach to a landing page, and that actually got meoff the road. So I've got a pdf that your listeners can download.It Brian Robinson Dot me. It's the same URL for my book, theselling formula, and it's the approach very simply, is pick your target,get a mail list and test it, create a letter of very simple anddirect letter asking a very simple question with a web address that ties to amajor need that you're trying to fulfill, and have a short video on thatlanding page with the very simple, straightforward option of what they can do torespond, and that's it. And we generally get that minimum five to one. We've had as high as twenty two one return on our mailings. Withthem approach. That is a significant, significant return. I'm going to askso this. One of the themes of the show is alignment. I thinkour organizations would all be much more effective if we were working with greater alignment, intention and holism across the various teams, typically marketing, sales, customer support, customer service, customer success, all in service of the customer asthe as the unifying point of focus. So, as someone who is obviouslyyour direct mail recommendation there and landing page with a video made me think about, of course, your marketing mind as well. What do you wish moresalespeople knew or understood about the marketing process? I feel like if you can aska question that will peek the curiosity, that is ninety percent of the challengein getting somebody to engage with you. So it's kind of the two amquestion. If you can kind of enter the mind of your prospect withwhat they're wrestling with. It too am. That really can make a difference inyour marketing efforts by asking that type of question. So, and Ican tell you most of my prospects weren't lying awake in bed wondering what they'regoing to have on hold at two am right, but we're able to createa question that resonated with them and gave...

...them enough interest to jump online andlook at the video. It's just questions. Again. I my own personal kindof mantras. Questions out of the key to life and one question couldchange everything for you. That's a write down. By the way. Questionsare the key to life and that one question can change everything. I'll flipthat a little bit. You know, you've obviously worked with marketing folks.What do you think? Marketing folks maybe don't understand or misunderstand about sales people. Are The sales process? That's a load of question. It's I've askedthis sales to marketing, marketing to sales, sales to see us, see ustwo sales and even named an episode. Is Your sales team hurting customer success? Hecetime, they answers there and in these conversations don't really happen,you know, like this salespeople go off to launch or sit over in theroom or being a meeting, and the marketing people, and you know it'sjust really easy to cluster and so so I like to knock down some ofthe common myths and misconceptions and create some shared understanding through the questions. Sothey are a little bit loaded, but I feel like it's a tough conversationand so we tend to avoid it. Well, and that you're right,it gets avoided. That's the biggest problem and in my experience with Corporate Americawe would get a sales team, for example with Johnson and Johnson, wehave had terrific, terrific people in all areas of the company. The challengewas, in my experience that, for example, in the marketing side withJay and j one of the divisions I was in was called Ethicon, endof surgery. We sold devices that were used by surgeons and surgery to helpwith bill resections, all kinds of things like that, and product would comeout. They would give us the talking points, which is great, butthen the reality would start to set in about what really mattered when we wereout in the field and what happened in terms of the disconnect is oftentimes thetalking points wouldn't get revised to reflect the reality of what was really happening inthe field. Therefore, the sales p people that came on later or thatwe're starting to move into that product and sell it more weren't getting the bestinformation possible in order to sell that product quickly. They had to struggle throughthe same learning curve when that curve could have been cut big time because theyhave the right talking points. And it goes back to the communication, likeyou stated, if marketing sales can truly sit down and have that conversation andsales goes out and tests things for marketing and then marketing says, you knowwhat, you're right, we don't need these points, we need to shiftthis, we need to flip it. That could make the learning curve reallyquick and change a lot for the sales outcome. Yeah, I think thatfeedback loop is really, really important. Obviously, you know, you doall your research, you maybe do some customer interviews or prospect interviews, youbuild the marketing material, you put it...

...out to market, but then thesales people are out there, you know, actually working it directly, and sothat feedback loop, even if it's just in the first two or threemonths, into your point to revise, to update, to refine. Obviously, if you could keep it as an ongoing iterative process, it would righthere. You just get better and better and better and better, but atleast a ninety day loop back where you get some of the top struggles andopportunities and missed points, etc. Because the the prep work in advance ishelpful, but it's nothing quite like actually going out and talking to the realpeople making the real decisions with the real money. That's right. And ifyou're in marketing, you know that unless you get some real hard feedback,you're living inside of a vacuum and that's not going to ultimately allow you tosell anything else, anything more, I should say, unless you're getting feedbackdirectly. Sure, Brian, this has been great. I have two questionsI always close with, but before I get there, is there anything thatyou've learned or taught over the past several years that we didn't cover today thatyou think would just be a really good takeaway for folks listening? Yeah,I think if I could stand on a mountaintop it's and yell this and wejust have to come over to Colorado. This is true. It won't happenin Oklahoma. There's to two words that I found to be essential. I'velet me preface this by saying. I'm looking at a bookcase in my officehere. I've got a ton of books. I've implemented maybe one percent of theinformation in those books and the greatest growth I've personally experienced is by doingthis, embracing struggle, and struggles not a bad thing. I think struggleis the most important thing we can experience to go to the next level,but we're not willing, because of the desire for comfort, to do thatas readily as we might think we are. So I would say be willing toembrace struggle and just let that wash over you, let it do itswork and I think you'll see how quickly you can grow if you allow yourselfthat experience. Such great advice. I'm really glad I ask that. Ifeel like you're a wealth of wisdom and experience and I just wanted to getone more nugget there. I'm glad I asked. So relationships are our numberone core value here at bombomb and here on the customer experience. PODCASTS are. I always liked to close by giving you the chance to think or mentionsomeone who's had a positive impact on your life or your career, and inyour wife has already been mentioned as one of the finest humans walking among us, and for you to have the opportunity to give a mention to a companythat you think delivers a great experience for you as a customer. Yeah,Joe Polish has had probably one of the greatest impacts on my life. Yearsago, I listened to his CD series at the time called Piranha Marketing,and the one idea that allowed me eventually to get off the road completely wasthe idea of free recorded messages, and...

I sent Joe a letter. Thisis an interesting story. I sent Joe a letter. He gets to hundredsand hundreds of letters, and I told him about my family, how muchit changed my life, and he one day I'm sitting my office, Iget a call and it's Joe Polish on the phone. I'm like, Joe, what's going on? He said, Brian, I got your letter andI never, I rarely call people, but it really touched me and wasinteresting is I've was out in Arizona, where his office is, several monthslater with my wife at a convention and I asked if I could come byand connect with him and he let me and I actually sold them our serviceand he's been in the client ever since. That's great. It's kind of amiracle really. Well, it's that again, just the idea that youwould sit down write a letter. I'm sure it was well written, I'msure it was sincere, and I would say to I don't know how longago that was, but I would say today, that the time and attentionthat we give other people is is an even more precious gift, I think, than ever, because we all find ourselves so harried and hurried and allthese other things, and I don't think enough people. So I think yourrecommendations, just in the sales process, are so meaningful, is that wecan create these moments for people through our time and attention that are just thatdid just break through. Hey, I don't normally call people on the phone. Hey, I don't normally host people at my office, but I'm goingto do both of those things because you showed me, Brian. Now I'mJoe in the scenario that you see me and you hear me and you understandme and that you value me, and that's, I mean, deep down, that's all any of us wants. That is connection. How about acompany that you that you really like a respect for the way that they serveyou as a customer, bombomb awesome your service and I've reached out a fewtimes when I got going about of your ago and your team is fantastic,I feel out of any company I've worked with. And you didn't you didn'ttell me to say any of this, so I'm just telling you, Ethan, I've been very impressed with how you portray yourselves and it's no lie,it's honest, it's sincere and I love it, love your service. Thatis so kind. I had no I would have taken this conversation a wholedifferent direction. I wouldn't have that. That's really kind. I appreciate thatso much. I think you know we try to hire well, we tryto be maintained, especially in that probably the customer support, customer success teamyou're talking about. You know, they're oftentimes dealing with people who are confusedor frustrated all day long, and so you know, we go to somespecial efforts to make sure that that everyone's appreciated, in that each customer isappreciated and that we try to meet them where they are. You know,even if it is a point of confusion or frustration, so that's awesome feedback. I look forward to sharing that with the team because, like that letteryou wrote, Joe, it's that kind of feedback that really is going toget someone through a day or let them know that they've really made a difference. So I appreciate that so much and...

...and again, to be clear forthe listener, totally unsolicited. I wish I knew. That's awesome, Brian. Again, this has been great. I really appreciate your time so much. How can someone follow up and connect with you? Offered that you areall ones, but feel free to share that again and and any other linksor places you might send people to follow up on any of these ideas.Sure. Two things. First, I've got a gift fear listeners. Thefirst three chapters of my book the selling formula, on audible. They cango to Brian Robinson bookcom, Bria N ro OBI and son Bookcom, anddownload the chapters there and you can hop on Amazon and get the book againthe selling formula. That's awesome. Continued success to you, Brian, andjust really appreciate your time so much. Thank you for the kind words andthank you for your thoughtful approach to connecting with people. And being a value. Thanks, Eathan's been a true honor. I appreciate it. Clear Communication,human connection, higher conversion. These are just some of the benefits ofadding video to the messages you're sending every day. It's easy to do withjust a little guidance, so pick up the official book rehumanize Your Business.How personal videos accelerate sales and improve customer experience. Learn more in order todayat Bombombcom Book. That's bomb bombcom book. Thanks for listening to the customer experiencepodcast. Remember the single most important thing you can do today is tocreate and deliver a better experience for your customers. Continue Learning the latest strategiesand tactics by subscribing right now in your favorite podcast player, or visit Bombombcompodcast.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (180)