The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

53. Sales Advice To Lead, Coach, and Align Your Team w/ Dave Kennet

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

A great employee experience begets a great customer experience. If you want to retain your best team members, you need to value them and invest in them. Today, we’re talking about investments in your sales team - training, coaching, and development. These are things that both make them better and demonstrate how you’re building them up. Did you know that 30% of sales reps get no coaching whatsoever? What does that say about their value in their company? (Exactly.)

I’m so pumped to bring Dave Kennett to the Customer Experience Podcast because he’s so on point with the importance of demonstrating value to sales reps through coaching. Dave Kennett, founder, and CEO of Replayz, also served as VP or Director of Sales, as well as VP or Director of Business Development,m in a variety of organizations in a nearly 20-year career so far.

What we talked about:

  • Doing the spadework before the last day of the quarter
  • Mentors are better than books
  • 30% of sales reps aren’t being coached at all
  • You’re going to be kicking yourself in a couple of years if you don’t start using video now

Check out these resources Dave made just for The Customer Experience Podcast listeners:

Where to subscribe, rate, and review this podcast:

... sales reps and seventy two percent of them got coached less than two hours on average in a month, and over thirty percent and get coached at all. The single most important thing you can do today is to create and deliver a better experience for your customers. Learn how sales, marketing and customer success experts create internal alignment, achieved desired outcomes and exceed customer expectations in a personal and human way. This is the customer experience podcast. Here's your host, Ethan Butte. A great employee experience begets a great customer experience. If you want to retain your best team members, you need to value them, you need to invest in them. So today we're talking about investments in your Sales Team, training, coaching development, things that make them better and things that let you know that you're building into them. Our guests today brings to the conversation nearly twenty years of leadership experience in sales and business development at places like hoot sweet pay Firma an autotrader, to solve one of the biggest problems he faced. Is a sales leader. He founded and serves as the CEO of replays, which provides remote and on demand sales coaching and training. Dave Kennett, welcome to the customer experience podcast. Thank you, Ethan. Great to be here. Yeah, you know, before we get into customer or experience, I'd loved for you to share with me because we chatted before but I didn't get the full story. You were VP of sales at a company that got acquired by Apple. Now that's something you know. A lot of VPS of sales and sales practitioners and managers listen to the show, but I'm not sure many of them have been there at the time when something like that happened. Like how did it come together and what was it like? Oh Man, what a phenomenal experience, and I have to do the footnote first that it's one of those things where I wish I could say, man, I was there from day one and like drove revenue to like X to why? The reality is I was like, I think, seven months into the ride when...

...we exited, so we were just getting started from on sort of the revenue side, and my Kudos are to the founders for building just F phenomenal product and to answer your question, yeah, it is the dream right. Like, I've been in startup world for quite a while and typically you're vested and in hoping there's a really exciting exit and some do, some don't. That's the startup game and this one did and I tell you it, it was just it was exciting because, you know, here's an organization Ethan that truly had product market fit. Like you know how we talked about product market fit all the time. Is that being the desired state? I've rarely in my career work for an organization where there was a hundred percent, well, let's say as close as you can get two hundred percent product market fit, where, to use the analogy of the fish or jumping into the barrel right, some of the biggest brands in the world absolutely just loved the buddy build product, and so to see that being recognized by an organization like apple, quite honestly, wasn't surprising, because I was able to see all these inbound leads just wanting to convert and pay what we were charging, because there's a ton of value there. And so for me it was really neat, as an entrepreneur myself now, to see individuals that had just worked so hard, not only the founders but a team of people that rallied behind wanting to build beautiful technology that solve problems for people daytoday, and and then have that recognized by apple. Pretty special. Cool. What a fun experience for you and and again, I hope it was a good exit. Let's go to what my where I always love to start these conversations. That, of course, is the theme of the show and it's it's customer experience. The whole podcast is to explore it and how different people in different seats in the organization think about it, the language that they use, etcetera. So when I see customer experience to you, Dave, what comes to mind? What characteristics are thoughts come to mind for you? What was need is we can all think of a frame of reference as us being the customer, right. So that's where...

I think of when when I am delivering a service, let's say through replace my own organization. It's the golden rule. How would I want to be treated as the customer? And ultimately, people vote with their wallets and so we need to ensure, yeah, that we take care of our our our team, and I know we'll be talking about that. But ultimately the customer is what's driving all of us coming to work every day and so making that a phenomenal, amazing experience to me means understanding what their needs are, ensuring that we're hitting those needs. And then, of course we need to throw the business aspect in. Okay, if they're paying x and someone else is paying why, and why is the enterprise and x is the you know, daytoday plan, the starter tire. Yeah, of course we're going to have to set expectations around what that customer experience is, but at least a liver or on what we say we're going to do. Something I always say is that disappointment is a function of expectations, and so if you can manage those expectations up front, there's plenty of value baked in. You know, to go back to your to your buddy build and to your definition there CX, then we're in a good position to meter exceed expectations and provide more value than folks are paying for. So really appreciate that. I want to ask a question kind of right where you just were there, which is, you know, there is the business side, there is the value exchange, and so you know before we get into a conversation about how to help our sales people be more effective and more satisfied in their work and better equip to deal with tomorrow's opportunities, talk a little bit about the tension between getting our sales rep to, you know, the right close rates or making sure they hit or exceed quota, blended with a focus on the customer or the customer experience. I think we're a lot of people, especially someone like me who is adjacent to sales, understand sale but isn't in sales directly. You know, I recognize that there's that day to day pressure to like get a couple more opportunities closed today or this week so we can, you know, make the month or make the quarter, make the year, whatever. You have to balance...

...that with, like are we sometimes shoehorning customers in? So how do you think about that tension between quota and delivering a great customer experience and getting the right customers on board? I think it starts from the top. So I think I've been in organizations where, at the end of the quarter, you put that level of pressure on the team that makes them make bad decisions in terms of maybe shoehorning customers in and that's not in line with my personal value system of philosophy. Have I pushed reps too hard or have I pushed customers too hard in my career? Yes, I have. I'm going to fully admit that. But we learn from our mistakes and the culture I'm building and my organization is again it's the golden rule, right. So no one's going to win if your shoehorning a customer into a product. You're just dealing with the ticking time mom and a future churn issue and then you've got another metric you're going to be concerned about. And so to me it's about ensuring that a when I say it starts at the top, it's really important that the leader is is saying, okay, let's think with the end in mind, which is we want happy customers and to have happy customers there needs to be a really good level of fit for their need and what we're delivering, and then the next pieces how it's done and how it's delivered. So if it's the last day of a quarter and we're having our huddle at six am and we're looking at the very last sort of commits, that haven't come through yet and as a sales leader I'm talking to the team, I think it's really important to say, okay, we need absolutely try and get these across the line, but we need to look in the mirror and feel good about how we're doing that and make sure that it's something where the customer feels like it was still a good experience. And so I also don't want to give you a fluffy answer like I guess that's nice in terms of okay, we all feel good, but if I were to take it down to grassroots level and help what that looks like, I think it's important to have honest communication with customers, right, and I think it's important at the end of a quarter when we're feeling pressure to hit quota, that we've done this spade work weeks...

...and months before, not just that day, right. And so yeah, I guess over all that would be my thoughts. Are Good, really interesting, especially the the top down component and what kind of expectations are we setting of these people and how are we making sure that we're coaching a customer appreciation and respect? So you've obviously built several successful sales teams over the years. I'm sure you've been in the position of a lot of folks I've been talking too lately, which is a lot of people coming into the sales rules, especially BEDR SDR. But but because there's such demand for good sales folks for out a sales organization, there are a lot of new people and young people getting into the game. So if anyone's listening to this, it's a relatively new sales rap. What are some pieces of advice you'd offer for someone just getting going and maybe who's also very earlier in their career? I think getting a mentor early in the game is very important. I often get asked, hey, what are some good books that I can read from? You know, from new reps and hooks are great, podcasts are awesome, but what I and they are. But what I would say is get a mentor. When I look back at where I grew the most in my career, there are certain areas where I had sprints over let's say a three month period where I grew more in that three months than I did in a whole year in other parts of my career. And I look back and I think why. I can attribute that to specific leaders that mentored me and in Hey. I'd say thirty percent of the cases it was because I asked for additional mentorship. Seventy percent I was just lucky. I had great people I reported to that I learned from. So don't wait. My advice we don't wait to hope that you're in that seventy percent where you have a great leader. Seek out mentorship, seek out someone that you can call when it's end of quarter and say hey, I'm getting this unhealthy tension at my organization. It's not in line with my values. How do you recommend I handle this? Those words of wisdom you're going to get from that person who's walk that path is going to be a lot more valuable than reading a paragraph in a book somewhere that's...

...meant for the masses. Love it and I think I might get a similar answer on this one. But you know what often happens if someone's a really good performer and then then it arises that we often are appointing some of our best salespeople into sales management roles. So for someone that's that's happened to you know, someone new in a sales management capacity, what advice would you have for him or her? Yeah, I said old challenge of you know, what makes a great sales professional doesn't necessarily line up with the attributes of what makes a great leader, right. And so if someone finds themselves in a sales management role and you're feeling like the imposter syndrome, like, Oh man, do I really belong here, my advice is a couple things. Number one, and this this ties back to your former question, what other advice would I have for new reps? Same thing for new managers. Work Your Butt off, work really, really, really hard, because you can be you know, intelligence is great and charisma is great and street smarts is great and business acumen is great. But if you rank and eight, hundred and ten on all those things and not at ten, you can make up for that by work in a ton of hours. And I think that's important because it demonstrates two things you're to to stakeholders. If you're a new leader. Yeah, you're trying to impress your boss. Don't do that. What you want to do is actually impress your team. You want to you want to be there to support the heck out of them. You don't want to be there as a manager, you want to be there as a support system. You want to be there too, absolutely ensure that they're getting the level of support and help they need. So your biggest challenge is a leader is to get the respect of your team. And the great news is if you were promoted from a salesperson, you're, you know, three quarters of the way around the track because you already know how to do their job. So I would say come in not with absolute any arrogance, but complete humility, saying okay, how can I absolutely support you and taking to the next level. Great answer, really practical and sensible advice. It doesn't surprise me, but...

...it does to like me to hear you walk that out, talk a little bit of what you're doing. It replays, you know, who are the customers that you're serving and what problems are you solving for them? I'm sure you experience that problem yourself, and so maybe talk a little bit about what you would run up against that made you realize I should turn this into a business in a service. Yeah, for sure. So as a sales leader for years, I I and one who really believes in coaching and has had a lot of, you know, coaching experience and, you know, taking all the different sales courses, etc. I really would wake up on Monday morning saying I can't wait to coach this week and to do a ton of call coaching, etc. Friday afternoon and come along and be five o'clock and be like man, I let my team down this week. I did not do as much call coaching as I set out to do, and that was a consistent theme, like every single week. And so sort of as things as I got more senior and I became a director and then a VP, I realized that not only was I still not getting out there enough, but my managers and my directors weren't and part of that was my fault as a leader. Right I was putting too much on their plate. And really what I found is, as I've talked to my peers and as we've looked at polls, this is a systemic issue. I mean we recently did a poll of sales reps and seventy two percent of them got coached less than two hours on average in a month, and over thirty percent didn't get coached at all. So the problem that replace solves for is we're an extension of the sales leader in terms of coaching. We work interchangeably with them. And you know, when you go back to what's important to a sales rep and what keeps them engaged in their role, yeah, it's their boss, of course, but it's also do they feel value or do they feel like they're making an impact? And so the fact that sales leaders are willing to invest in their learning and development through replace really makes a different. It's there. So what we do Ethan is I know you know, but for for the the audience, the challenge that we just talked about is number of hours coaching, and...

...so replays will come in on an on demand sales tune up sort of way and you know, we think gone of the days where you have to do Sarah. We take your sales team off line eight hundred and twenty five and some board room somewhere and we just do quick touches that the reps can do outside of key selling hours. So thankfully we have the technology now to do this kind of coaching where they'll take their zoom calls or what have you. They'll send them through, whether the discovery calls or Demos, and our team a replaced coaches who are all like x inside sales professionals. Ourselves and coaches will provide video recorded feedback and then we will end up doing will upload a two pager in their slack instance or what have you, along with our video recorded feedback. So if they're handling a pricing objection, this demo will pause, it will jump on the screen and say, Hey, maybe you could have handled this way. We build in repeatal processes for them. And then the the third thing we do is quick sort of Thirty Minute Live coaching where we reinforce the muscle muscle memory. So that's replays. That's how we do it and that's the problem that we saw in the market place that existed that. Thankfully, now, with the technology we have, we can provide a solution. Set. Yeah, one of the neat things about it, as I learned about it from a mutual friend of our, Scott Barker, is the flexibility of it, not just the asynchronicity of you know, you do your calls whenever. Our coaches will review them, watch it at at the coach's convenience, do the video coaching on top of it, do the right up share it back with the sales rep in the sales manager so that they're shared understanding. There just a flexibility of it that you could do it. You know you do five calls a month, or to do one call a month for each rap, becau. It's just really neat the way you approach. I think it's into your point. I think it capitalizes on to today's technology, which is a question I want to follow up with. Is You know you do as Much Video Base East coaching is possible. Talk about the importance in the power of video in this scenario. It's so critical. I...

...mean there's two frames of reference here. There's for the coach to the Rep but, more importantly, the REP to their prospect. And in this day and age, I expect sales wraps to be doing demos with pre sending a screenshare link and a video link. I expect that they, the SDR, will let the prospect know hey, are a he's going to do a video call with you and I expect that the rap would have amazing lighting and good background. And unfortunately what we see a lot of the time is the videos not on. They're just doing a screen share and that's a missed opportunity. Right. It's like you and I wouldn't go meet with a prospect at their office and they like we're not going to go in the office, we're going to sit on the other side of the wall here and just have a conversation. It's like, you know, we're going to look back at this in a few years and be like, I can't believe we weren't turning our video on. And you and I both know the best reps out there are doing this consistently every single time. And why are they doing it? They're doing it because it allows a level of building rapport that you just don't get if you're not looking each other eyeball the eyeball right, and you're able to pick up on nonverbal queues of the prospect. But they're also able to glean sort of trust and credibility from seeing how you conduct yourself in in the sales pitch. So I think it's absolutely critical as a sales wrap to do that. And for coaches. Yeah, we absolutely do all of our coach by a video, really really good take their. The most fun thing, of course, is this idea that I'm going to be sitting just outside your office having a meeting with you. You know, like we're going to be. You know we're going to be in real time, but I'm just not going to get facetoface. He's just ludicrous. And so the idea that it's so easy and inexpensive to do to really set our sales people free again, like we hired them, and you know this. You've hired, I'm sure, dozens, if not scores, if not maybe even hundreds, of sales reps over the years. You know, you know how you hire them right, you hire them for, you know, not just basic competence and maybe some personality...

...traits, but like what is there ability to build rapport how does it feel to be with them in an interview setting? How do they respond when you give them something good, bad or ugly, like in a in like at the softer, intangible stuff is what we kind of seek out and select and hire for, and then we just go hide them behind, you know, emails and phone calls and other faceless digital channels. So I love this idea of advocating everyone turn their camera on. The other thing, too, is it normalizes it for the buyer as well. Rights these buyers are oftentimes sellers or marketing people or other people supporting sales people. So the more I think we can normalize this idea of looking each other in the eyes we, you know, act as buyers and sellers, or at least in the consideration set, and really excited about the opportunity normalize that even more so. I love that you coach to it. I'm going to guess that as you get into these organizations, you're coming alongside the sales leadership, in the salespeople, and you are you're honoring their processes that are in place and doing coaching related to the way they view their own business. Right. You mentioned values a couple times already, which I really appreciate respect, and so that's part of a value set or a culture set. Talk a little bit about some of the contemporary sales or maybe even they don't have to be contemporary. Some of them have stood the test of time. What are some of the sales philosophies that are in play these days, and which ones do you personally like? Yeah, so to me there's a couple different things. There's your traditional sales methodologies, so challenger, spin, Sandler, etc. And we see we see a myriad out there, right. So one of your questions earlier is what is a profile of a customer work with, and it's interesting to see the different methodologies deployed, depending on the size of organization. And then there's the you know, the second aspect, which is culturally. You get a leader that will come into an organization and they don't have a methodology deployed. So they'll kind of take a hodge pods of their past, which is cool, and they'll create their own methodology which is kind of the best of the different...

...things they've learned. And so what we see in smaller organizations. Often will work with startups where a CEO is built a really cool product or service, usually SASS based companies, and they'll hire their first handful of sales reps. they haven't really done sales themselves and they're not at the stage where they're going to hire a sales manager. And this is where we will talk to the CEO of how do you want to make your prospects feel right culturally? What's important to you there, and we will definitely coach to that. But we are sales methodology agnostic every place, so we will come in and we will adopt the methodology are using. So we have a number of customers, larger ones, that have deployed challenger sale, for example, and we will coach to that. And then yesterday I was talking to his customers. Probably a prospect is probably going to move forward and they're like, they don't have a method, a strict methodology, but they've built their system of five steps that every rep has to follow. Well, we'll coach to those five steps and you know, if I have a big disagreement about it in terms of I really don't think this is the way to do it, I'll voice that with the sales leader explain my position on why they decide to move forward that way. That's fair, because we can still add a ton of value. So often replays will dance in the white spaces where sales methodology doesn't. And so you know, where do you see the handbook on how to conduct a really good screenshare? Where's that in Challenger? Where's that in spin? It's not there. It's there to help navigate through conversations, which is awesome, and it's not knocking those trust me, I love those methodologies. What we do is for the modern seller, when you're looking at two thousand and twenty and beyond and how to deliver the absolute basket demo that's going to resonate with your prospect and navigate through discovery calls in a way that's going to make them feel comfortable but also get the information you need. That's where we come in. And then that's where we have what we call the replays, sort of structure and that sort of very beginning touch of the of the first conversation, the...

...discovery right through to the close. We have different things that a hundred percent from a checklist perspective, the best reps are doing, because thankfully we've got this network effect going where we have hundreds of hours of demos that were watching for some of the best reps in the industry. So for every demo our team watches, that adds to the power of what we're able to deliver in that next set of coaching. Does that answer your question? Absolutely? Yeah, I just I was interested, you know, I knew that you would work across people that's that are maybe hardcore fundamentalist subscribers to a particular approach or philosophy. And then I love your description of someone who, you know, they come into a place where it's not yet shaped and so they bring, you know, all the best pieces of their previous career. And so yeah, it makes perfect sense because there does need to be that alignment between the way the reps are getting coached and, you know, what has been established as the norms there were maybe in some of those cases hasn't fully been established yet. So so you've worked a variety of settings. I assume you've had exposure across the organization, certainly as you operated at a VP level. What do you wish, because one of my goals here is to create some alignment throughout our organizations, our organization here at bombomb in, your organization, other folks that are listening? What do you wish more marketers and marketing teams understood about salespeople and or the sales process? What do you think are some of the misunderstood things that if we just understood it better, we can empathize better and create better alignment in coordination? HMM, you know, it's so counterintuitive to answer this without saying what I think sales leaders should consider when they're talking to marketers. First, because I'm of the school thought that sales these are pointing too much over at marketing. Saying more leads better, leads right, and I think we need to keep our like as sales leaders. We need to keep our own side of the street clean before we start, you know, prophesizing to heads and marketing. So I want you to know it's very counterintuitive for me to say, well, Ethan, here's what marketers need to know. Like you know what I mean. So is it okay if I...

...start there with what I would say? Do you take these are just my questions. You could deal with them every like. Okay, cool. So I would first say, let's let's look in the mirror as a sales leader and think through what marketing goes through in a day. Right. We often think, oh, they don't understand us in sales, they don't understand how hard we work and their leads aren't qualed lighting, they're not sending US enough and the reality is marketing professionals are there because they care deeply about getting quality leads and and sending the right number of leads. And so number one, first and foremost, I would say to sales leaders you need to remember that you're in the saying, and I don't want to use an overuse certain analogy, but I'm going to like you're in the same canoe out there, right, you got to be rowing in the same direction. If you're not, you're just going to be spending circles. So step one know that your success is their success and vice versa. And unless you guys are lockstep, you will not be able to maximize the engine. You'll do okay potentially, but you won't maximize the engine. And then to answer your question with with marketers, I would say, and also I would also say this, marketers often say to sales leaders, we work so hard to get these amazing leads and we've got this cost per lead that we've worked really hard to get budget for and your team is wasting that opportunity. Often I think they're right. Actually, I think we're not doing enough touches. I think we're not doing enough care to those leads. Obviously not in every organization. Is a ton of organizations that do a great job, but more often than not, especially in the early stage organizations, where they don't see the value of a sales development function, where they haven't you really maximized that area of the factory. Where how many touches do I need before I put it into nurture and versus just moving on? And so I would say to marketing leaders, make sure you are trying and extend in all the branch to the sales leader early and say hey, we need to know where you want to be from a revenue perspective...

...next year so we can then reverse engineer top of the funnel. Will we think we need to do and we'll tell you whether we can or can't do that. But we can't have a plus B needs to equal, see, and so if they don't know what B is and what's C is supposed to be, they can't figure out a. So I think they need to see. Even the language I'm using, this is what they need to know, like I should be. I think it's important for marketers to keep in mind that the same thing that I said for sales leaders. There in the same boat and it's important to sit down work together with this sales leader on what are your conversion rates by channel, what are the expectations for growth, reverse engineering that into how many leads you need per channel, and then work together every single week on Hey, how is our conversion this week relative to what we thought it was going to be when we did our two thousand and nineteen or two thousand and twenty Plann Yeah, that annual plan, you know, three months in really starts falling apart quickly. or changing or shifting. So it's like yeah, weekly, for sure, at a minimum Um. Earlier in one of your responses you mentioned you know, if we push too hard up front, it turns into potentially a churn event or maybe even a churn epidemic later on. So let's go there for just a minute before we go to some of my favorite questions of the event of all these conversations. What do you wish more CS, customers success, customer support? People understood or or appreciate it about salespeople are the sales process. So so probably get a little controversial here. I think that customer success needs to realize there in sales, and not at the cost of a bad customer experience. There there to make sure it's a good customer experience, but in terms of ensuring that they are upselling to the extent and they need to do landing and expanding and protecting that turn rate and mitigating and reducing turn rate. It's effectively navigating through conversations...

...with customers, which is really important and it's an important skill set and there needs to be empathy and understanding, but ultimately they're working towards an objective and that sales. So I would say let's not be afraid of it, let's not look at sales is a dirty word. If we are, we're not thinking about sales correctly right. So I think it's important to be comfortable having a number that you're accountable for, is a customer success person, and being proud of that and accomplishing that number. Yes, through having valuable conversations with your customers where you make sure that the organization's delivering on what they said they were going to deliver. It back to your common earlier of meeting or seeing expectations, but also and delighting the customers, etc. But it's also important to remember that just because they have a number of growth that they might need to hit doesn't mean that that doesn't tie into the customers goals. There could be all sorts of bells and whistles or the next tier up that actually really benefits their current customers, and I think sometimes customer success shies away from that because they're like no, no, that's that's sales, and it's like actually, no, it's understanding the customers needs and ensuring that they're providing the right level of support and knowledge for that customer to make a decision on whether they go through an upward migration. I think you're dead on and I hope I'm not controversial in agreeing with you or that there's really not that much controversy there may ultimately, we are all in sales, and certainly especially these SASS model companies CS. Seeing their role that way is a dramatic part of really capitalizing on, you know, the early investments in generating opportunities and converting them, because you know the revenue really stacks at that end where you know you're retaining it and expanding it and upselling it and cross selling it. Dave, this has been awesome. Before I let you go, I've got a couple things for you. First, because relationships are our number one core value here,...

I would love for you to think or mention someone who's had a positive impact on your life or career and to mention a company that you really appreciate for the type of experience they deliver for you as a customer. Awesome Zoom. Sorry, I answer second question first. I just can't tell you how much zoom makes my life more efficient, for replays, for sure, and just in my day to day communication. There's just no question that. And now out. Does my ass need to be a sales eater? Can It be anyone? Anyone you want? Yeah, I have to say my folks, to be honest. So they're the ones that gave me my value set and compass right that I strive to work towards, don't always achieved, and also early on they said you can do anything that you set your mind to, and without that North Star I wouldn't have jumped into replays and done what I'm doing or taking risks of working with startups or anything else. So I have to probably give my things there. Yeah, my things to your to your folks as well. I think you're your compass. A new north stark came through in our previous conversation. I think it came through here today, and so I'll hat tip them as well. Hey, David, someone wants to follow up with you or with replays. They want to learn more, they want to go deeper. What are a couple places that people might reach out? Well, first and foremost, I'm going to create a link that has sort of tips and tricks for how to navigate through the best demos and best discovery calls, specifically for your all our listeners here today and so they can go to Replayscom Ford bombomb tips and will ensure we put a bunch of tips and tricks that they can consume and share with their teams. And then, beyond that, I would absolutely love to talk shop with anyone that wants to. They can hit me up on Linkedin or hit me up but David replayscom anytime. So for those of you who are listening and aren't going to go to Bombombcom podcast to check out video clips and to read more and actually click the links that they've just mentioned, Dave's last thing is spelled. It's Kennet...

...and it's spelled Kae Nnett, and replays is spelled our play zcom and the bonus page he put up is bomb bomb tips. That's bomb bomb tips, bombomb tips. Thanks so much for listening and thank you Dave so much for being here. Thank you even I really enjoyed this. Clear Communication, human connection, higher conversion. These are just some of the benefits of adding video to the messages you're sending every day. It's easy to do with just a little guidance, so pick up the official book. Rehumanize Your Business. How personal videos accelerate sales and improve customer experience. Learn more in order today at Bombombcom Book. That's bomb bombcom book. Thanks for listening to the customer experience podcast. Remember the single most important thing you can do today is to create and deliver a better experience for your customers. Continue Learning the latest strategies and tactics by subscribing right now in your favorite podcast player, or visit Bombombcom podcast.

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