The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

58. Uniting Customers and Brands Through Experiential Marketing w/ Ruthie Schulder

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Three experience-based goals are the foundation of an amazing agency that builds the concept of experience right into its name: The Participation Agency.

  1. Translating digital experiences into lived experiences.
  2. Creating remarkable, resonant experiences without abandoning data and analytics.
  3. Building affinity between customers and brands through experience.

The extreme laser-focus on experience obviously caught my attention, but as I learned more about The Participation Agency, I saw that its success can be credited to the dedication and energy of the two founders… one of whom I got to interview on The Customer Experience Podcast.

She’s been named Inc’s Millennial CEO Rising Star and one of Adweek’s Disruptors, one of 39 women leading a revolution in advertising, media, and tech, and she’s also the co-founder and CEO of The Participation Agency Ruthie Schulder.

We had such a great conversation about how experiential marketing builds brand awareness and ultimately relationships.

You’ll also hear about...

  • Experiential marketing
  • Definitions of placemaking and 360 marketing
  • Why it took hustle to build the agency
  • The experience Ruthie creates for her partners (clients)
  • Why you don’t really need an MBA

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To becauser experiences, sort of Mer,as you need to be talking about people at te, different places of where theyare in their knowledge of the brand of prob Po e service. The single most important thing you cando today is to create and deliver a better experience for your customers,learn how sales marketing and customer success experts create internalalignment, achieved desired outcomes and exceed customer expectations in apersonal and human way. This is the customer experience podcast. Here'syour host, Eten Beaute, translating digital experiences, indelivedexperiences, creating remarkable, resonant experiences without abandoningdata and analytics building affinity between customers and brands throughexperience, that's what the participation agency does for itsclients, who they call partners, and they include names that you know likeAirbnb, Amazon, Redbull, Pandora, state farm and many more. Our guests today isthe cofounder and CEO of the Participation Agency. She's been namedinx millennial, CEO, rising star and one of adweek's disruptors, one ofthirty nine women leading a revolution in advertising, media and tech. Ruthy.Shoulder welcome to the customer experience podcast. Thank you. So muchfor having the MSO SID is. I he here. Yeah, I'm looking forward to theconversation, because what you're doing with experience is, I feel, like you've built the agencyaround it, where a lot of the other folks, I'm talking within myself. Youknow we're trying to figure out how to raise up the importance of experiencewith our organization, so I'm looking forward o the conversation, but beforewe get going in earnest, you know IAS reading a lot of the press about youand about the agency and about your cofounder, and you know some of theheadlines about the work that you do include words like outlandish avantguard crazy whimsical like how do you feel about that? Like from yourperspective, are you doing things that are outlandish or whimsical or like?How do you view the work that you do at a high level? Yeah? I think that we come up with like outof the box creative strategy. It's definitely unique. I think that thereare a lot of iterations of the same thing. Thattypically happened within my industry, and so we definitely push ourselves oconstantly becoming up with projects that iave never been done before. Ithink winsovill is Wi, maybe a little bit too fucky of a word, but wecertainly did a lot of pride in the fact that we've built experientialpatforms that are completely no o the industry. It's something we definitelytake really seriously because it challenges us as untrepreneurs, also toconstantly bequesting the satisclone to constantly be saying what seems alittle bit risky from about the creative perspective, but also a littlebit from you know: Kom O a business pospective or from a marketingperspective, but taking very, very calculated risks and buildingsstrategies around them so that we know that we're introducding e idea that maybe new, but we're setting it up for...

...success from the GETCONA matter. Whatreally smart calculated risk is the thing that t at goes with me and thisidea of doing things that haven't been done. Let's start where I always start,which is when I say customer experience to you. What does it mean? Thoughts,characteristics, definitions, what is customer experience yeah and it's agreat question. I was listen to a lot of your other podcast and I think a lotof the guests are a little bit more like a tactical rule where they'rereally interact. Their brand is really interacting with customers at a pointof sale. Our approach is actually very different because a lot of the workthat we do and building out these experiential campaigns are a lot moreabout brand awareness, and so I think also a big different ator for us isthat I think typically customer Experienceis, like existing people whoalready know about you that you already have in the door who are connectingwith you. You know they're buying something theyrosed to buying something they just tougt something we are com, an it froma different approach, because our goal is to engage the people who alreadyknow about our brands, but also are really are even biggor goal as to raiseRando awareness, and you get lots of new people to come in. So to me,cusomer experiences, sort of Americ as you need to be talking about people atthe different places of where they are in their knowledge of the Brand ThaProba for the service. You know, I see I spending a lot moretime, an linked in the past couple years or so, and I'm seing a lot ofconversations where there's you know, there's some pushback on branding andbrand awareness, because sometimes it's difficult to measure Roi. I assume thatthe people that come to you and when they come to you as partners with youragency, that they already appreciate the value of brand awareness. But youknow to someone: That's like you know. We need to put our money into someplace that we can see a very clear and direct and obvious Roi. Typically, atthe point of sale, like you know, I need to see conversion rates alltheseother, like really specific things. No, what's your position, so we do all ofthat. We do both. We don't just Dover anowarness. We haven't ever really BEIGclient right now who huge you kdon come from an thats, asubsudioof, a huge company, and they have really really really aggressivemetrix to get you know, a million downloads on their digital product, andso what we're working ath them to do is how do you build a strategy that haslike twelve different touch points where you have your big brand awarenessmoments for people who are you know, running through time square and need toget the hit of like what is this company Han is theyr offering in thetwo seconds that they have win theyre passing it all the way down to when youhave your captive audience, how are you making sure that you're not onlygetting them to download the product that they're actually understandingwhat it is, and then you kind of feel that in that spectrum all across, andso we really were talking to people at these different points of kind of likeattention. But the metric is very clear: like a million dollans two thousand andtwenty and like we are we're going like...

...a cylinders fired of what it's going totake to get that done, because you can't do just one honestly, you can'teven do just like two or three, like you have to have a very wide range ofapproach. Were every single thing. Let's say you have ten points on youron your little chart there. They all have a very specific purpose and you'reusing them all together to create the sum of the parts of your marketingcampaign. So, as you're designing twelve touch points, how do you viewthose? So, first of all, I love this idea of the client ays. This is myproblem. This is the outcome. I need IAM going to engage you in your team tofigure out how to get there and then you tackle it from there. So when youdesign EGH Twelve fifteen touch points in a campaign like this. How do youthink, like do you map those ther theyre, probably her their multiplelayers or they see quention? How many of them are like these? Five could bethe first touch and then we're going to move to this thing or like how do youview it like w? I'm trying to see a visual map in my headmadsaye even alittle bit more context, so we are an experiencal marketing agency, soeverything that we do is rooted in some formof live experience. That's beenvery heavily amplified by a digital experience and we very much have thesetenants of experiential digital and influencerare all working together,Tocerny. What we call you know like our visital feedback loup for customers ofwos. You know you see them in your in your for walls, but then you obviouslydon't want to forget about them. What are you doing to keep that in the loop?An the lument will look at it from the conpolment period, so that does alittle bit of Compex of what we know is successful in terms of building thistype of campaign. We always start at the high level creative platform. So,whereas a lot of experiential teams or focus on like the activation, we don'tthrow events. We build patforms that are rooted in experience, so we alwayshave a high level of you know: here's The cree idea, here'sthe Ballian cry, here's the thing that a consumere see is that gets them tounderstand a little bit about you and your wife through the name, the visualidensity, where they seem sort to show up and then under that there are thedifferent players. So maybe you have your you know your top three ten pole,events where you're you know creating something totally custom and unique andyou're welcoming people in then you have your social media campaign andYoure alining with people o influence to come to those events and start theyact, the drumbeat of conversation that goes on and on then maybe you'responsoring existing events where you're getting Twentyzero people here, anthirty Tzard people here and you're, creating an experience that is a an extension of the platform thatyou've already built that people have started to recognize and you show upthere in spupicific ways with messaging. That's right for that audience, andthen you kind of keep going from there en look at it really sort of, let'sjust say, say a twelve month period and we're constantly wating to see. How doyou create a real kind of like up and...

...down pype of relationship with customers? wherthere's always something for them to grab Ou to, but it doesn't always haveto be the biggest thing. It's not always going to be the smallest thing,but you really want them going through a journey with you where theyunderstand who you are and what you're offering is, and they see it and justsee it showing up in different places and then the experience maybe helpscreate. I would assume, by design, evokes the feelings that you want to beassociated with those you know those visual marks and the other ideas. YeahI mean they all really have to work together. For sure I mean it's all about pressingthe Messageand, the way that we build our kind of Fatonses, we ere very, very big on the idea of that people,Hav ing able to Bi Gust something within late three seconds. Like if yougive you say, if you can't say it to somebody into sentences and have themununderstanding one hundred percent, it's not going to work because you're,just not getting enough of people's attention and, like I can't ever putonto a customer to do the work to distill thewn and I'm trying to tellthem. It has to be very, very straightforward, and so it's achallenge to come up with. The right thing is, but when we know we haven'tKno, we have it and Dhos a wherethe. Really really successful campaigns comefrom great in doing in reading up about you and about the agency and on yourwebsite linked in Etceta, I saw a few words that I'd love for you just togive a little bit of a definition to the first one is placemaking. Yes, so we are. One of I think the onlyagencies, that's really going out and proactively going into tersharinmarkets to do activations or you know, launchprograms were in. They had a PRATUC Pill Hasem for two years we've been inAsbar Park, New Jersey, Jersey City. We are really really bi on this idea of that cities and town and emurding townenshave some of the most incredible energy across the US and from a businessperspective and from a cultural perspective. We feel that not engagingthose people and these areas are are a hugeness in a lot of ways. So what wemean like place making is going out and really doing our due diligence andsaying what are these areas of the country that we feel are really on therise and really kind of need a little bit of marketing help to behonest, like brands come to us to make their products and their identity isrelevant and culture either for the first time or again, when you're goingthroughout. You know everybirth and so we're doing the same thing that cirfinmarkets, and we really believe that these cities are changingand envolving, no matter what I want to I'm win. A group of people cometogether and put intention behind that. You can create something really reallyreally magical and N that those opportunities don't come along. Veryoften you know the Maury in New York...

City is a only get three invented onceor twice you know, once Thi city really has an identity, it's very hard to goin reframe that and so we're connecting with developers and governments, and youknow, city officials, to places that we love that. We think are really amazingthat we know they want to have a little bit mare shine in the map and say howcan we bring our marketing experttese and our some of our attention grabbingprojects to your areas? Awesome this s just kind of a softwer question, butyou know ar these. As regards to specific cities, because I saw I sawone of your press pieces that listed a couple of those cities in a handful ofother ones. Are these things that you feel intuitively? Are these things thatyou're you're getting feedback from like? How do you identify some of theseplaces that have a really good opportunity to be made? So in both, wehave a music program that I'm sure you ren about called for those who torewhere we have a series of homes across the US for musicians on tour say forFree Andexchange for social content. So when we were opening up our some of the new houses a few years ago,we wanted to go into the markets, and so we looked at actually a musicians,tour rout- and we said, if youare a torn musician in America. Where are thetwenty cities that we know you're going to stop in along the way? And then ofthose twenty cities? We went and we ether spoke to people who we know spenda lot of time there. It got so be back and then we went and we looked up likethe top five and we were like wheare the ones that intuitively resonit withus were. We say we have a got feeling from the people were meeting here, anthe businesses that were seeing from the care of the city councilmen from the philandropistof the community, who really really are committed to making this a successfulstory. Then we use our intuition and our knowledge and ourfeedback and our statistics all of that to really come together, love it. Itsounds like a microcosm of the whole spirit of what you're doing with theparticipation agency yeah at a high level. I saw this thre and sixty infearless marketing, so for us for experiential a lot of people have it ina box where it's an event or it's Amoun. It's an activation and you go and it'sthree days and you go for an hour and like that's it. That is not ourapproach to experiential. We don't think that that makes for successfulmarketing campaigns. We also don't think that's sustainable from aresearce perspective, it's very expensive and it's very wasteful andyou're, just not following up with people who have already come into yourspace, and you know that they want to be marketed to. So we build out three nsixty campaigns that have the live experience component, but have a hugedigital strategy around it and an influence, our piece as well to makesure that you're, hitting whatever you need to hit in terms of your successmetric. So that's what I mean bike thredrd and sixty fero is marketingyeah. So I come from like I have a very,...

...very undeprenarial spirit as dos mybusiness partner and we've really built our company on that and taking thecalculated risk like we were talking about, and we have been really really really luckyin finding fearless marketing partners and giantcorporations all over the world who are really vision, oriented and who willpush and push and push and will maybe not be the most popular person in theroom, but really fight for an idea that they believe it that we all believe it.And you know I think fearless marketing is really just maybe the way to saybeing an entrepreneur in a giant corporation. So, let's, let's switchgears to that a little bit. So you founded the cofounded the agency in twothousand and eleven. Almost a decade ago, like cept the scene for us like what was the agency model at the time,what was the client experience and how were you kind of improving that orputting an evolution or an innovation onto that? What was the text scene likewhat were some of your earlier campaigns compared to what they are now?I know that's a lot of questions bucas seen for us, like you, know foundingand then maybe how that differs from from what you're doing today or I'lljust reoun that please any question so Jessica and I met Anon Your Business School. We wereboth getting or Edbas and we both have these umtoperial backgrounds andeveryone else was going into thes, shying corporate jobs and you're. Likethat's, not us, let's start something. We know we're going to start IING,anyways, sofighting it and we watch agency, and it was two ofUS sitting around a small table and a tiny room. That's a third of the size of our carn office.Jussshie and I share- and were you know almost thirty people full time now, sothe grirl has been really awesome and neither of us have evency backgrounds,which I find very free and very liberating, because if anybody offeredme a job to go work on a traditional agency, I would say now, so we have been really building our companyto be a service. You know in marketingservice business in a way that we think is the right way to bring that into theworld. We honestly got a lot of our earlier projects. We were brought onthrough other agencies who needed extra support, and then we realize reallyfast that our ideas were really good and they were resonating. We were fast.O Production was fast. Our idea generation was really fast. We wereable to bring in the right coaborator, so you know all clients really want totap into culture and we live in New York. We live in Brooklyn. We know otof artist fin a lot of shasting lot of musicians. Ye were able to really bringin the right people that were in our network, and we executed really welland being able to melt our creative side and or Shoul Chet excite with ourlike MBA braiins of we don't do things...

...that don't work because we're ambitiousmarketers and because we don't want to waste any of our CIENTS dollars allsort of lattered up to us, having success early on and being able toreally build a business and then, in terms of wit, some of the other tepcompanies were doing. I mean for me the most relevant thing to talk to is thata lot of our friends start to tech companies and started raising money andfor a hat. Second, we were like. Maybe we should launch a product hat. Maybewe should raise money and we decided not to- and you know, agency model isreally tricky and I don't have that all sort of out for sure, but I'm so happythat they didn't raise any funding. Lone of our friends are kind of still really stressed out tenyears later about it, and so that was a really really big decision for us toknow that that would not be our palh yeah. Let's go a little bit deeper intothat. I mean like Bombom you, the participation agency hit the inkfivehousand, although I think you were in the three hundreds wewere in the sixhundreds socongratulations Ow, bat yeah, so just go a little bit deeper intothat growth story, and maybe some of those funding considerations andbecause there's so many obviously paths to growth, but just go a little bitdeeper into some of that in Ow. The story of the growth of the agency sureso for the first couple of yeears we grew really slowly, I think until year,for we were seven people, you know and we got there slowly and then we locked one of our biggest clients whonfirtunalely anoher lie to say but they're a huge company and our mainclient. There is, if your was leader and if your whas marketer and he reallyencouraged us to grow our team, and he would you know we would grow a tevenuestream and we would grow the team, but sometimes you fowthe dim first and wewould just have faith that it would come and that really got us to be a lotF, less apprehensive. I think about growth. That way, and then, in terms ofe Ron You grow, we have sconwe hustled, you know we taught ourselves how to bereally really good sales people and we get in clients and we alsokeep clientsand that's a to Pron of. We do goo o work and they like working with us. Youknow we're very service oriented they, like hang out wit this to we reallyapproach. Eere thought partners wee really are not as executor. So we havelots of conversations about vision and andmission and how do you get there anditerations of creative and all of that? And so it's been a very, very organicgrowth and one of these you know I have a close friend who did a TEC START HAVand he raise a ton of money and I didn't go his way and he said to me itjust a couple of months ago. It really resonated with me. He said you know, Ilooked at you and you didn't skip any of the steps like you built it ber bybreak and then you'v had to keep adding more and more briaks, and that's reallythat was really awesome to hear because you know whenyou're in it Shard to see it that way, but it feels...

...sustainable because we didn't skip anyof the steps. It's great. I have a couple follow questions on that one is,you know soo when he went from seven to whatever the next level was, let's say,ten or fifteen or twenty? How are you organized? So that's one question. Iguess I'll just ask that one question at a time. You know we have our seniorleadership team and mean R we're only about thirty people full time. So it'sstill pretty flat and all of our teams are very, I don't Ow Woun, ' Say Crossfunction, but we have a lot of people who are working in a lot of differentprojects, and we also have a incredibly incedibly collaborithteam andrespectful team, and that really helps. But we have our you know to defitiveson top and then we have our senior leadership and then, under that ter onthe same out very much hierarchy. So we have someone of a flat structure, Iwould say: Do Do you and your Cofounder Jessicatake primary responsibility for, like, I guess, Opportunity, generation insales? Yes, yeah. We actually just hired our first busdead person in thehistory of the agency a month ago, we've been doing in ourselves andthat's obviously something that I really leave the charge of in a lot ofways. She does like creative and production, an client relations andbusiness development, but we also are constantly thinking together about howyou grow the business, because there's a thing that that I love about ourcompany is that we have our client side of the business, but we're constantlygrowing our business in different ways like we have our own experiential Ip, which wethey know like, took that risk in doing and creating and was has been reallyreally successful in, like those are things that were constantly constantlyigating. Together of sure, we can talk about how to get new clients or whodoesn't does that pinch reating, but really no thing. That's going to get usthis expodential growth are coming up it these non agency Mo concepts of howdo you build a business, doing things that we know how to do really? Wellreally. Smart approach is like you. What can we best an this is classic. Iguess hedgehog concept would be the business school term like you know,what do we like doing? What can be best in the world at and what does the worldneed? Yeah, I think that's the. I think those are the three things that overlap,but it's so it sounds like you're tackling that well from a clientperspective, so you design experiences to help brands and companies engagewith their customers and potential customers. How do you think about theexperience of working with the participation agency like? What do youwant and your intentional about the language too, which is interesting?Their partners, not clients, talk about that? What are you trying to create forthem number? What is like? We want to makeour lives easier right, like especially in the word that we doin production.There are a lot of messy parts and they're hiring us to be an extension oftheir team to be thought partners, but to take a lot of the work off of theirplate so that they could focus on other...

...things and they can focus on in thebyin internally and all of that, and so we wh when I say that we're very servisoriented we Wen ma herselves available. We also really care about the work justGoini as founders care, about the work we don't take out projects we don'tcare about, because then we won't do a good job, and so, when somebody callsme a play, calls me and they want to talk about it. I love talking about it,because I really really wanted to be successful. It's like it's, not it's,not just a number for mens spreadchee like I. Every piece for us should be aportfolio pece and if it's not we're all failing, and so we really care N,we take it seriously and you know we've our team. We have nice people thateverybody wants staying out with, and I think you really hit some magicalmoments in client services when people genuinely want to like get dinner aftera long day on site and knowing that they can rely on us in a lot ofdifferent ways from a business perspective from a productionperspective from a you know, social tenection perspective really is a big deal and that, ofcourse, our creative is really good and we do follow us work honestly. If ourwork wasn't good. Nout of the relationship stuff, it would matter allof it has to be like really a point yeah I some of the stuff you said,theyre you. Obviously you care a lot. You do really good work, you're veryintentional about what you do and don't do you invest in real relationshipswith people to you this a little bit of a personal question. Do you divide workfrom network like, like, I feel like someone like? You might always beworking? how Di like? How does that? How do you manage that for yourselfbecause you're so invested in it? I'm definitely always working for sure, butI don't mind it because I, like I got into a place in my company and throug alot of work with my executive coach that I work with of not letting certain things be stressful. Like Iused to go on vacation, say Wel, I have to delete my Gima lap because there'sno Ay, I can see o r work email and I'm like whatever Yoknoit's all great stuff. I you know, I have small children, andso I'm trying to be a lot more careful about not checking my phone when I'mwith them, because they're old enough now that they it matters and theynotice, and so I and that for me like, I want to be more present with them.And so I need to have the self control ofd, creating some sort of separation.But I think has U. Fer me. Work means a lot of different things like yes,ther's, a client in today or thers o project Datoday, but like being able tobuild a business where the sky is the limen, and it's literally just Genagetting to make all of the decisions we have. Nobody else to answer to is adream of a life and so being able to spend an extra fifteen minutes in theshower one, because I'm in the middle of a really amazing brainstorm- and Ihave an idea- and I was like that's...

...genius- like I gotta- let that Germanatfor a little while and to be able to think about that and bring that back isso much fun like I I'm so honored, I'm lucky that I get todo those kind of things. So you know all that being said. MOSTLAHT bite soon,as I put my kids to bed, I'm so tired and it's my brain won't allow for anywork, no matter how hard I need to get things done. So you have that to it'sgood I'll had gratitude to the list. It sounds like a really healthy andprivileged opportunity that you've, the gratitude you have around it is isimportant. I can't believe we have to have this conversation in two thousandand twenty, but we will because it's important to you and you and Jessicahave also done some work with. Let's work talk about women in business. Whatwhy why is this a conversation in two thousand and twenty? What are some ofthe impediments to having a more balanced professional environment andand what kind of work are you doing around, that there are two ways o on I enjor theipediments question. One is that I think that so many amazing women sorv in similar places to me in theircareer or younger, are realizing now thit doesn't have to bethe way that it was for the generation before us, and I think so many of usare at the precipice of this like giant awakening, but the impediment is thatWeit's a lot of hard work to you program yourself from the crap that wasspent you when you were sixteen. You know coming from your mother's, comingfrom all the magazines coming from everything that we were exposed to,because you know twenty years ago it was a completely different story andwhen we were being raised, the messaging was really messed up. I meana a lot of. It is still really messed up at it was really messed up. So allof us who were you know, grew up. Reading team, you know, Hosmopolitanhave a lot ofvry training of our brains to do, and I think that just from likea more personal individual level for allof us, if you don't have the right of support around you to say that thingyou keep telling yourself his fake and totally messed up, and it's on all ofus uplift, each other out of these really tax of patterns. I think that'sa really big thing that I see happening with a lot of people but, of course, isnot happening to and that's a huge ampentof in, because you can haveopportunity in you'R in your business life all day long, but if you believecertain things about yourself that aren't true you're, never going to beable to Sep into that opportunity. But from a practical level on this, likemore corporate side of life, I mean I think that there's still a lot ofwrong people at the table making decisions. I think you know you stillhave a lot of middle Ageo, white men and we're likewe should aer the woman and you're like what does that even mean? You know, but I wit you of like: Whyare we even having this conversation Imean last year it? But people are likeit's the year of the woman. I was like. Excuse me what US Wer. We tot that, butyou know it's it's I'm hopeful, because...

I see a lot of women and especially youknow lot of young women in their Teis and ty Fort. You know there all of us ar weget it like we get that we have to be. We have to like the aggressive andstarting to make change, but when I see you know Ou, let's wher as a communityt that we host in New York and La for women and it's an open because an overnetworking community, it's been really amazing and hearing a lot of theseconversations to of obstacles that women are coming. I up against everysingle day. I mean it's in's, all still very, very, very real and e I'll justhave to constantly uplift each other to get out of this inch by Intr, inge yeah,that's good. I appreciate what you're doing on both coasts and in this ideaof the stories you know we all operate by stories in our own heads there's.Some of them are so deep that we're not even conscious of them, but we tellourselves stories all the time and it's how we operateand. So I've been a lotmore intentional over the past few years about questioning the storiesthat I'm operating by. So I think in programming is another piece oflanguage you use ther, which I think is exactly right and it's not like it'snot like. There was some nefirious overlord. That was like, let's programeveryone. This way it was just the the dominant culture at the time and we'rejust we're continuing to unravle it a little bit and change it into somethingthat is better for everybody, yeah. Definitely, okay, so last question.Before I closed the way, I always love to close them really looking forward towhat you have to share on it. You and JESTICA met at Nyu sturing schoolbusiness working on your NBAS, but you're. Both you've used to work,hustle and it sounds like you've- worked very, very hard and hustled yourentrepreneurial and Inan popular business culture. There's this tensionbetween colleges, expensive advance degrees versus hustle and entrepreneurs,and I feel like I feel, like entreprenrs, who hustle are typicallythe loudest voices that say school is a waste time and money talk about thatTetan! That's where you came together like what did t. What did thatexperience mean to you and what do you think about it today? It's a greatquestion. I am overeducated Fialyou, my hap yeah, my husband. Ihave this conversation all the time because he gan Jenyor at eighteen withno money and nothing and started a real estate company that he's had for overtwenty years and he didn't go to college and he feels hat that hasalways really held him back like just in his own mind, and I, like that'scrazy. I don't understand that and I feel very overeducated. I went toBarnard for Undergrad, which I loved, but I don't remember when I learned,and you know I got my Ba from Miu and again it was a great experience, but Ireally remember anything: I've learned it's helpful to go, and especially whenwe were earlier around in the company and we've GOINETO meetings- and it wasit's helpful to say- have an Mva from nyu. It gives me I two young women. Itdoubtetly gives us a little bit more...

...credibility. Do I think it's anecessary thing? Definitely not am I hopeful that by the time my five yearold twins are college age. There is another option for how people geteducated that point in their life. Absoutely think the EDGUCAT. I think itis it's too expensive. It's exclusive of most people and I learned more, likeI learned more like how to be an analadable thinker. I learnd more skilllike that. I don't feel like I, I don't. I just don't remember anyor fin part. I think you know our education systemis just so right for innovation. I truly truly hope that that wit, when mychildren are the gage fors, another aton, a Yan in my husband, and I havethought about this for that fuck. I A this. Have this argument it. My kidscame to me and said I' not going to go to college, but I lined up a job formyself. I'd be like great. You should do that because you know what I'mhiring people I don't care. We they went to school. I care what their workexperience is because I don't Ias, sorry that you partied for four yearsand someone's dollar you know like. Are you going to be able to do the job hand?I need y? U To do, and so I do think the hustle of the work is the thingthat that's actually going to get you there yeah. I guess that an a interviewyou can you can almost immediately I'm just speaking imagining youinterviewing a perspective team member at the at the agency. You can probablysee immediately whether or not this person as the fundamentals to thrive inyour culture, Oh yeah yeah. This has been awesome. I'm really excited aboutwhat you're doing. I love the approach. I love the placemaking approach andwhat you've done. I love the the brickby brick piece that stuck with youfrom that front of yours who took hem out in a cash in a tech company. Sojust congratulations and thanks for Spennintoian with all of us in thisconversation, but before I let you go because relationships are our numberone core vallue here at Bombam, someone who's had a positive impact on yourlife or career. If you could mention that person or more than one, somepeople have gone up to three, but you know when I say who's had a positiveimpact on your life or career, give that person to mention and then givethe mention to a company who you appreciate for the experience that theyprovide you as a customer, yeah ll t throut, quick names of my appreciation,so just gross or my business purder we've learned so much together. It'syou know. It's really like having another life partnerage and I chosewell my coach Chris placky. I joke with her. I just starte working for about ayear and a half ago, and I say you will be buried next to me literally. Don'tknow how I ever did any of this without hert. I wont of my mentors have severalmentors, but one of my mentors, HOS name is Evan crowd. Who is always therefor me? So wise has given me incredible incredible. Dadvice an just brings suchan enthusiasm and F energy. That uplifts me even at my darkestmoststressful time periods and then in terms of a company IAM, going to throwout sort of like a wild apart answer,...

...because it's less customer experience,tept touching you type of thing, but I am actually buying all of my thingsright now from targeted as I'm sein from Instagram, so the sponsored post,Algorithm, Instran and facebook is, I loving it a'm living for it, BAS, I'mbuying only like ECO friendly, sustainable waste, free things now, andthey are in my brain of course it's based on stuff, I'm searching for, butlike even before I search for that next thing, they're already telling me thethree best companies- and I love that it saves me so much time and so muchresearch, research and I'm like psyhed about it. It's so good were. I feellike we're in this interesting phase, where that that is getting good, it'sobviously going to get better and better and better, but at the same time,I'm still being followed around by ads of things that I already bought. Ri,like like it's getting good, but it's got a long way to go. Yeah tell that'scool ruthy. If someone wants to follow up with you or with the agency or withthe lets work network, you know where would you send people that enjoyed sumar all of this conversation for sure our website is? This is Glov Pacombecause we're the participation agency and I'm Roefy AF. This is the pcom oran email. I think it's on the website. It's we at this is the PPOM and ityou'll be directed to me or the right person. Awesome Ruthy! Thank you. Somuch for your time, andto. Those of you who are listening definitely check out.This is the pacom beautiful website well organized their press section. Ifound really entertaining just to see examples of some of the work thatyou're doing and follow, along with the stories, continue success to you hen.Thank you for your time. Ruthy. Thank you, clear, communication, humanconnection, higher conversion. These are just some of the benefits of addingvideo to the messages your sending every day. It's easy to do with just alittle guidance. So pick up the official book rehumanize Your Business,how personal videos, accelerate sales and improve customer experience learnmore in order today at Bombamcom Book. That's Bo, MB bombcom book thanks forlistening to the customer experience. podcast remember the single mostimportant thing you can do today is to create and deliver a better experiencefor your customers, continue learning the latest strategies and tactics bysubscribing right now in your favorite podcast player, or visit Bombomcompodcast.

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