The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

82. 3 Ways to Fight Zoom Fatigue w/ Ethan Beute

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Video meetings are more than likely here to stay.  They’re exhausting, though — way beyond mere eyestrain. If more of us are going to work remotely, we need to implement these 3 ways to overcome “Zoom fatigue.”

 

I’m Ethan Beute, Chief Evangelist at BombBomb, host of The Customer Experience Podcast, and co-host of the CX Series on the B2B Growth Show, here today to share actionable ways to improve your video meetings.

 

In this episode, you’ll learn how to…

 

- Schedule a 25 minute meeting to give yourself a built-in break

 

- Quit multitasking during meetings & get permission to look out the window

 

- Record a video message rather than having a video meeting

 

- Free your time & attention from so many video meetings

 

Check out these resources I mentioned during the podcast:

 

- My book teaches you how to Rehumanize Your Business with video

 

- Watch me talk about Zoom Fatigue on the news

 

- Learn 6 steps toward better meetings

 

Subscribe, listen, and rate/review the Customer Experience Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play or Google Podcasts, and find more episodes on our blog.

We will continue to see opportunities tolean into video conferencing and video messaging to stay facetoface with the people who mattermost to our success. The single most important thing you can do today isto create and deliver a better experience for your customers. Learn how sales,marketing and customer success experts create internal alignment, achieved desired outcomes and exceed customer expectationsin a personal and human way. This is the customer experience podcast.Here's your host, Ethan Butte. Thank you so much for giving a playto this episode of the Customer Experience Podcast and the CX series on BTB growth. My name is Ethan Butte. I am your host. I'm also chiefevangelist at bombomb and Co author of the Book Rehumanize Your Business, and oncea month I do a solo episode of the show where I share something I'vebeen thinking about or working on recently,...

...and I recently enjoyed the opportunity tohave a live appearance on the morning news on the Fox station in Denver,Colorado. Now, the topic was zoom fatigue or video conferencing fatigue, andyou know that when the local broadcast news wants to talk about something it istruly broken through to the mainstream. So I know that you are doing videocalls and I know that this affects you, I know what affects your customers andI know what affects employees. So it's highly relevant in a customer experienceconversation. Again, the customer experience involves every single touch point along the entirecustomer journey and a great employee experience is a necessary precursor to a great customerexperience. So the more we can all fight the fatigue, the better offwe are with our customer experience. No matter your level of familiarity or exposureto video calling, video conferencing, zoom...

...calling, whatever you want to callit, I'm certain I've got a couple tips that are going to be usefulto you and to the folks that you're connecting and communicating with through video calls, and this will continue to be helpful and relevant. We are not goingto be doing less video calling and less video messaging, even as local economiesopen up, even as some employees go back to the office, this isgoing to continue to be a valuable way and an increasingly common way for usto be facetoface with people when we cannot physically be there in person. Andof course this is not brand specific. We call it zoom fatigue because zoomis the dominant player in the space. It's an awesome platform. We useit at bombomb we have four years. We use it internally for employee meetingsand we use it externally, of course, with all of our customers. Whatwe'll do here over the next several minutes is define zoom fatigue and talkabout a couple reasons why it happens and...

...then offer three specific categories of solutionswith a few different ideas and opportunities within each of those three categories. Andlast note here before we get started. If you want to see that liveappearance on the Fox station in Denver, just visit bombombcom podcast. That's bombbombcom forward slash podcast. There we do short write ups for every single episode. We include the fully embedded audio and we embed video clips as well.Will only have one video clip in this post and it'll be that live appearance. So what is zoom fatigue? Essentially it's brain drain, it's mental exhaustion, it's that feeling we have at the end of the day where we maybehad four or five or six meetings, all done by video conferencing, andwe're a bit more worn than normal. We're all doing a lot of thesecalls, personally and professionally. Sometimes we're doing them after work with family membersand friends, and it takes a lot...

...of energy and there are a fewreasons why we feel this exhaustion at the end of a long video call day. The first one is pretty obvious. It's I strain. It's just morescreen time. We're spending a lot more time looking at our screens. Inaddition, we're aware that we're being watched. We're on stage, we're on airand we can see ourselves. That awareness is something that most people paysome level of attention to, and that level of attention can cause additional strainand additional exhaustion. Finally, and this one's interesting, our brains aren't quitefully adapted to this environment. We have to work a little bit harder toread body language, to read emotion and tone and to read all those otherrich nonverbal cues that make video so valuable. The answer, of course, isn'tto stop doing zoom calls. Instead,...

...there are a few things we cando before the call during the call and instead of the call first upbefore the call. Switch up your schedule. Most people schedule meetings at square intervalsfifteen minutes, thirty minutes, sixty minutes. Instead, schedule a meetingfor twenty five minutes instead of thirty or fifty minutes instead of sixty. Thisgives you that pause in the break that you need between calls in the casethat you go back to back, of course. Another idea here is tolock your calendar so that you cannot be scheduled back to back. Of course, not everyone has complete control of their schedule, but by creating a cultureof twenty five and fifty minute meetings, you're doing a favor to your fellowteam members, to your customers and to other people that you might be meetingwith. Also, by creating a little gap in your schedule between calls,you're avoiding that awkward moment that can happen if you're scheduling backtoback calls on thesame zoom link, and that's the case...

...where your next meeting drops in onyour current call. It's super awkward. It's weird for everybody. No onequite knows what to do and what typically happens is the person on the nextmeeting bails immediately and you have to reach out and let them know that it'sokay to get back on that link. So consider ways to switch up yourschedule. Next, during the call, take breaks and relax. Give yourselfpermission to look away from your screen. Now, if you and I werehaving coffee or lunch together, we would make a lot of eye contact,but we wouldn't stare each other down. There's no reason to stare at yourscreen, to stare at yourself or to stare at the camera lens on thecall. There are other ways to demonstrate that you're engaged in that you're payingattention. Give yourself permission to look around, give yourself permission to look out thewindow and, should your name come up or should you be asked todirect question, your response will demonstrate that you are in fact mentally dialed intothe meeting and that you are paying attention.

Now, the elephant in the roomon this topic, and something I've been guilty of before, is checkingyour email, checking slack, checking social and doing other things while you're onthe call. If you are feeling any form of fatigue at the end ofthe day. This is the first and best place to look. Take breaksand relax from looking at your screen, close your browser, put your phonedown, stop multitasking, pay attention to the meeting. If you have somethingmore important than that meeting or you don't actually belong in that meeting, youshould have the courage not to attend the meeting. You should have the courageto uninvite yourself or, if you're not quite sure, you should solicit someinput in advance of the meeting. What exactly are we going to be goingover? What is the purpose of the meeting and what kind of value doyou expect that I will provide to the meeting work? What type of informationdo you expect that I will need to get from that meeting? Again,stop staring at the screen, stop staring...

...at yourself, stop staring at thecamera, give yourself permission to look around and stop multitasking on the call.All of that will reduce screen time and reduce eyestrain. It will be alittle bit freeing to your mind and you can actually dial in to the contentof the meeting so much more effectively. Final pro tip here. If youfind yourself board during the meeting and you need to stay engaged, try takingnotes by hand so they're in the during the call. Take a break andrelax. Topic I was starting to bleed into the third and final category.Instead of the call, try other approaches. Obviously, the live video call you'reon May not need to be a live call at all. In fact, it may not even need to be a meeting. So a few ideashere. Remember that your phone is actually a phone and you can walk andtalk. This is great, especially for one on one meetings. If youhave some one on one zoom calls coming...

...up and the next week or two, try rescheduling those as phone calls instead and walk and talk the meeting.It's extremely refreshing and it may actually be a better conversation as a consequence.Second, of course, there's still plain old typed out text in emails,text messages, social messages, slack messages, etc. Again, you may notactually need to have a meeting about the topic. If it's just conveyinginformation, send it as a message. If it's not a complicated topic,just send a couple of messages back and forth. You may be able tosettle the issue, explore the concept or advanced it's the idea or opportunity witha little bit of back and forth rather than a live, synchronous call.Finally, and related, you can record and send video messages. You recorda video when it's convenient for you and then you send it to one personor five people or fifty people, and each person opens it up and experiencesyou in person when it's convenient for her...

...or him. So it's got allthe benefits of facetoface, all that rich nonverbal communication, but it doesn't requirescheduling and coordination and all those other things that get us live on a videocall. At the same time, there's no back and forth on getting theright day in time. There's no need to be live in the moment andrespond immediately. This gives people a chance to experience the message and respond accordinglyand respond on their own time. That's what we've been working on for adecade at bombomb. I've sent more than tenzero videos myself in emails and textmessages, in slack messages, in Linkedin messages, Tenzero of them, andI know bombomb customers and bombm employees who sent even more. and I coauthoredwith my friend and teammates Steve Passinelli, the book on why and how todo this. It's called Rehumanize Your Business. How personal videos accelerate sales and improvecustomer experience. These video messages can...

...be used across the entire customer lifecycle and across the entire employee life cycle, and, of course, they canbe used to connect and communicate with people in your personal and professional networksas well. Anytime you click send is an opportunity to add a video,to bring the message to life, to communicate more clearly, to build somehuman connection and ultimately, to increase conversion, to get more yeses. Now thepandemic has reminded us of the value and importance of human connection and gettingfacetoface in person, in video conferences and in video messages. I'm not surewhat's going on at your company, but seventy seven percent of bombomb employees reportedthat they love working from home. On a four point scale, the topone was I love working from home. More than three out of four peoplesaid they loved it, and only four percent of people gave one of thetoo bottom responses. So the next great...

...majority there was the it's okay fornow. Point being, we will continue to see opportunities to lean into videoconferencing and video messaging to stay facetoface with the people who matter most to oursuccess. If you have your own ideas and your own experiences things that Imissed that can help with soon fatigue, reach out again. My name isEthan Butte. My last name is spelled bee ute. Reach out and connecton linkedin or send me an email directly, Ethan etajn at Bombombcom. Thanks somuch for listening. I hope you picked up a couple of ideas.For more episodes of the PODCAST, check out Bombombcomlas podcast. For rehumanize YourBusiness, visit Bombombcom Book. Again, my name is Ethan Butte and Ithank you so much for listening. Have a great day. Clear Communication,human connection, higher conversion. These are just some of the benefits of addingvideo to the messages you're sending every day.

It's easy to do with just alittle guidance, so pick up the official book rehumanize Your Business. Howpersonal videos accelerate sales and improve customer experience. Learn more in order today at BombombcomBook. That's bomb bombcom book. Thanks for listening to the customer experiencepodcast. Remember the single most important thing you can do today is to createand deliver a better experience for your customers. Continue Learning the latest strategies and tacticsby subscribing right now in your favorite podcast player, or visit Bombombcom podcast.

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