The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

98. The End-To-End Transparency Trend w/ Nina Simosko

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Cannabis dispensaries, being designated essential during the COVID-19 pandemic, have had to pivot how they interact with customers. From online delivery to seed-to-sale tracking, businesses in the cannabis, hemp, and CBD space care deeply about providing a customer experience that is, above all, transparent.

 

In this episode, I interview Nina Simosko, Chief Commercial Officer at Akerna, about transparency in the customer experience for cannabis dispensaries.

 

Listen in as Nina and I discuss…

 

- Why the trend toward transparency is here to stay

 

- How Akerna came to receive inquiries about garbanzo beans and leafy greens

 

- How to adapt culturally to pandemic-based challenges in the employee experience

 

- What the role of a Chief Commercial Officer is

 

- What Nina learned in large companies that serves her well today

 

Subscribe, listen, and rate/review the Customer Experience Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play or Google Podcasts, and find more episodes on our blog.

People want that transparency. Theywant to know what they're putting in their bodies. The single most important thing you cando today is to create and deliver a better experience for your customers,learn how sales marketing and customer success experts create internalalignment, achieved desired outcomes and exceed customer expectations in apersonal and human way. This is the customer experience podcast. Here'syour host Eten, Baute, Canabis, connected data and contactless,but still consultative sales, will connect all three today here on thecustomer experience podcast, our guests spent eight years of Senior VicePresident and Global Chief Operating Officer at SAP, and she held seniorsales strategy and operations roles at companies like Nike seeble systems andHP. She served down the advisory Boards of more than a half dozen techcompanies. She currently serves his chief commercial officer at aCARNICOURP, the first cannabis compliance company listed on Nasdaq,ticker, Kuren, Ker N, if you're interested, Nina samosco welcome to thecustomer experience podcast. Thank you. So much ethen thits a pleasure to behere yeah. We were chatting before we hit record and is a Kurna in Denver. Itis yes, headquartered in Denver, Colorado, yes, cool and you kind oftriangulate into den one of the things I love about living on the front range.I'm down the road from you in Colorado Springs is that it's pretty easy to getto either coast, but you typically head West. I do tympally head West. Yes, Ispent the last. You know twenty plus years of my career in Soican Valley.Also, of course, my you mentioned my stent at Nike Love, Portland Origon, soI maintaine a homeup there as well. Yes, great awesome good for you for the kindof just to get into it. When I say customer experience Nina. What doesthat mean to you? Customer experience, for me is how a company makes you feel things could be super efficient andfabulous, but if you don't feel a personal connection or you don't feelanything doesn't matter whereby you know another company might not have itall together, but if they make you feel good and you feel satisfied. Thenthat's a good customr experience. So it's really all about how a companymakes you feel. That's o wit me, I'm with you on that a hundred percent. Idid a solo episode, probably about sixty or seventy episodes into hostingthis podcast, and asking smart and accomplished people like you how theywould define this and- and I came to the same place after listening to allof that feedback and doing some of my own thought on it, and those feelingsare the necessary precursors to good thoughts and then ultimately, goodbehaviors and then ultimately, ultimately positive online reviews. Thestories that we tell other people and all of that, what is it about feelingfor you is it? Is it the is it the intangible nature of it is the? Is itthe emotional component, like you're,...

...very clear on feeling what do you? Whatdo you think about the feeling component in particular? No, I thinkit's, I think it's both and I think how cusmor experience really will be thenext competitive differentiator in the ends. People want to do business andyou're doing business with other people, so you could have two things that are relatively the same: You're going to gowith that company. That has the people and make you feel a certain way thatyour interactions that you feel like you're being heard you're having funit's really all about the intensial and the emotional aspects of it that defineit, and I think that will be the next competitive differentiator across anyindustry. You could name that's where we're going. I think absolutely I agreewith you and I think it's kind of going into directions. One is thisfrictionless self serve. Everything is greased and easy, and fast and you'renever confused or frustrated in. That is a you're moving to true commodityand the cheapest price in the most efficient supply chain, and then on theother side. You have this kind of the human t, human component and this thetrue emotional connection, not with how easy and convenient it is, but insteadwith the kind of the trust, repor relationship confidence, you know allthe positive kind of omit the human side. Is that part kind of how you seeit? Million percent agree. I am with you yes good and so we're going to geta little bit into into probably more of the human to human side, but before wego much further help people who aren't familiar understand more about a Kernawho's, your ideal customer. What do you solve for them? What are you all doing?Well, that's becoming increasingly difficult to answer. Actually, so aCurnen, as you mentioned, is a software company. We are publicly traded on theNASDAC. We've been doing a number of acquisitions lately, which really helpsto broaden who our customers are. So these data systems, which is underneaththe ACERNA umbrella, sells to states and governments. We are in fourteencountries and thirty one states, and so many states have chosen leaf datasystems to run the compliance and regulatory systems of the state. Wehave empty freeway, which is our software platform that actually doesthe seed to sale, tracking and folks running MJ freeway could be anywherefrom multistate operators to individual dispenseries. If you are growing acultivation, if you ere doing infusion and extraction runs the gamut. Soobviously, you know there's there's a lot of customers that we serve in there.We also own Sola Sciences, which is amazing, tagging technology relativelyinexpensive compared to the competitors in that space, and it's phenomenal foranti counterfeit and for truly knowing where, where the Canavas came from andto ensure that t that it's safe and reliable, so yeah, I mean we boughtample organics just anouse last week they are a the DFACTOGO to Cannabaskind of Seega Seles tracking system in...

Canada, where it is federally legal. Sowe are getting into welcoming those team members and going to markettogether. It's going to be fun. Trellus is another acquisition we recently didjust a few weeks ago. That company is based in Los Angeles, California. Theydo a lot for the state of California and some of the particular nuances forCCA comfliance that California, state and countis require. So, as you can see,when all of our you know different companies underneath the umbrella,there is quite a wide variety of customers that we serve yeah it's greatit's easily and by far one of them more interesting and definitely one of themore complicated responses to that question. I yea its alreay know it'sgood. It's really interesting what you're doing you're really bringing alot together. One of the lines I read in sturtying up on this one was thatyou're building one of the world's most transparent and accountable globalsupply chains in CPG or consumer packaged goods and I'd love for you tokind of Tigten, all of that up a little bit for people. What when I think aboutit in overly simplified way, I think about again, transparent andaccountable. I think that obviously provides benefits to the to theregulators fed state, whatever. It obviously provides benefits to thepeople involved in that supply chain, no matter where they are from. You knowwholesale to retail and everything in between, and then I think about thecustomer as well. I'd love for you to give a pass on kind of the benefit ofroping. Together all this transparency and accountability for any or all ofthose stake holders- and the most interesting thing to me is thatobviously in a regulated industry, it's Super Helpful, but then I also thinkabout kind of the softer side that I think about kind of the youngerconsumers that are that really care a lot more about some of the valuesbehind or the trust behind, or the supply chain, components to anythingthat they're buying, so any thoughts you have on that. I welcome well t athat. That is precisely the reason why I joined the ACCARNA team almost oneyear ago. You Know Age aside for most of us who are over thirty five years ofage when we were growing up there. You know you might have known someone whois a vegetarian, but there's just been an explosion now of farm to table withthe restaurants veganism. You know people go on these Paleo things. Peopleare caring, much much more about what they're putting in their body and ontheir bodies. I grew up my mother, I jokingly say she was a little crazy andthat she we would not buy store, bought bread. She would bake her own bread. Wewould not have you know the artificial sugar cookies in the house and have tobe the ones with the real shirt, and I and the reason I joined this company isbecause I'm super passionate about that, and I think that the generations belowus coming up are going to care more and more. The calory counts now, even infast food and California are all are...

...all posted, and so this software,although we are laser, focused on being a leader in the Cannabus HMP CBD space,is really applicable across the board to leafy Greens, vegetables, we havegotten phone calls and inquiries for folks that are are cultivating andexporting garbon so beans. So this is a movement that I think is just going tocontinue to grow, and so this software you know again, although we get labelkind of as a canobus company, we don't touch the plant. Our software seed tosell tracking and it'd be amazing if one day, if there's a equal, I godforbetter semino outbreak in the leafy green industry, those farmers would beable to very quickly identify the farm, the field and the plant. Where that letus outbreak occurred, we would no longer not wonder, and Oh we have to dothese big recalls. We don't know what farm it came from like. Hopefully,those soon will be a day of the past. I love it. I love some of the otherinquiries that you're getting in it an they lend themselves, obviously to theseed to sal transparency C to sal tracking. You said you joined a yearago, and you are chief commercial officer, you're, definitely the firstchief commercial officer on this podcast and so I'd love for you to givea go just to that role. To that title, is it kindalike, a chief revenueofficer like how do you all think about that? It is akin to chief revenueofficer for shore, but I also think chief commercial officer. You knowanything that is commercially viable. We are, you know very. We have openAPIS and we are very partner friendly. I think we all believe on theexpecutive team that we are stronger with our partners, and so we haveninety five different kind of ancellary and complementary offerings Taintegrate directly into our software, so we publish those open Apis. We allowpeople to go and connect and integrate, and we are certainly stronger together.There's things that we never want to be our core compedency, the financials onthe ERP side right, we've done beautiful integrations that areseamless and we have customers live on sage on netsite on sap, and so you knowwe're stronger with those clients in our court. Things like payments right so aropay is a greatexample of a partnership that we just formed. Happy Cabbage online delivery.Anything that's touchless right is is kind of hot right now and much safer,so we have a robus partnerico system, so the chief commercial officer isreally anything. That's going to help drive revenue, expand the ecosystem andcommercially make our product more viable awesome from an org standpoint Iwant to get like. I don't need you to visually Drout, an Orang Char, but likewhat are some of the key functions that report into into you: Sales MarketingPartnerships, cool customer success,...

Gos for Yep, yeah exact. Well, I guessyeah hat. That brings us all the way back around wher Yo acknowedge, youWSCRO, when I think you know marketing sales cs, but then also thatpartnership component that you spoke very very clearly and well on, and itmakes so much sense. So you mentioned touchless in that pass. So let's gothere. We're recording this summer. Two Thousand and twenty late July wereobviously still in the middle of the pandemic, somehow kind of a resurgence,and so the cannabus business in particular, especially at the the salepart of CEE Dosal, has historically been in person in store Offan, aconsultative sale like some of us that are selling software. It's a relativelyit's relatively new for some folks, I mean cannibats isn it a new category,but retail is new in a lot of the markets that they're in, and so it'sconsultative. What have you seen or heard with regard to the pandemic? Withregard to that kind of touchless experience and how Er you know, whatare some strategies, or some techtits being implemented to kind of connectcustomers an a safe product? I have been extremely impressed with everyonein the canavas industry about how quickly everyone had to adapt and pivot.As you know, you know cannabis was deemed an essential business during youknow, especially during the shelter and place tin, the lockdowns. Well, what doyou do like if you're a dispensory? How do you continue to run your businessand our clients with our help and some of our partners as quickly adapted to?How do you do like an online kind of bud tender consult? What does that looklike? Who can offer that? So you know we've collaborated and quickly formedpartnerships with happy cabbage really to cultivate insights, and you know,derive unique business and Olynics through customer centric experiencesthat are not in person. I don't know if anything's ever going to replace thatin person kind of by tender console that people are used to an hopefullyand when we get back to having a vaccine and getting kind of back tonormal, but I think that could be R for you know, while off and so curb sidedelivery online menu ordering all of those things we've had to quicklyfigure out how to adopt and I've been really impressed with the wholeindustry. They got itself together very quickly. You know people especiallymedically who need their prescriptions, so yeah I'Veni've been proud of whatwe've seen and, of course, you've probably also read: It's been anamazing uptick right I mean when available, we've see online ordersincrease by over three hundred percent in some areas. Right delivery hasincreased more than a hundred and fifty percent we're allowable. So it's been aquick pivot and it's been exciting and a little crazy, yeah totally and thethe most interesting thing about essential businesses that are so inperson and consultative is that there was no gap. You know I can think of alot of business. For example, I went to...

...the dentist last week, which is aninteresting experience for a different for a different podcast conversation,but you know they were closed, for. I can't remember, I think she said ninetydays or something, and so that gave them this window to theorize. To youknow in the trade magazines and trade publications online, you know figureout the best way forward and do some planning kind of beat it uphypothetically and then kind of start rolling it out. Whereas you know in abusiness like this one where it was deemed essential, I it was a seamlesstransition which makes it really that much more challenging what was likewhat was the the middle of that window, like n in the Oh, my Gosh we'reshutting everything down, but oh my gosh we're staying open to speak tothat widow exactly what it was like. I was oh my nod, and so you use quicklystowp people pivoting to those video consults right. I mean look at whathappened with zoom like there was people who didn't know who zoom was andnow like. We live our lives. Now on these video calls to enable socialdistancing. So, yes, it was Oh, my gosh. How can we figure out this hack? Wefigure out that and again like the individual dispenseries in theindividual cities, no matter where they were in the country. They really workedhard to quickly figure out a safe way to continue doing businesses normal,but it was a heavy lift and a lot of twenty hour days versus you know yournormal, nine or ten hour business day, but I think I think it worked out greatand we're going to see what happens in thefuture. He has oe bank yed go ahead and speculate for me if you're willing orable to or anything that you yeah. I guess it is speculation, because no oneknows what's going to happen, but you know of some of the changes that you'veseen over the past several months, which ones do you think will stick andwhich ones do you think will fade away as kind of temporary stopgap solutions.You know, I think all of them were here to stay. Actually, I think the onlinedelivery. I think the online ordering. I don't think any of that's going to goaway, even if we, you know, find a vaccine and kind of get back to normal.The one thing that's going to be real interesting to watch is the federal andstate legalization of cannabist. Right I mean I feel like covid has caused somany businesses, unfortunately, to go under the states, are going to belooking for some tax revenue. This is a real nice way to get some times, crevenue back in thesystem. So it's going to be real interesting as we go into this electioncycle and we look and see what the states do. I knowit is on the ballot in the state, my home state of New Jersey and others. Soit'll be interesting to see what passes wit doesn't, but I think that's goingto be fascinating to watch and obviously I'm hopeful that we get to afederal, federal legoes like legalization sooner rather than later.I think it's really important yeah and I think that a software company likeyours and probably the community around it, is going to play a vital role inthat again, particularly for again transparency, accountability, the youknow, I think, obviously there's some...

...level of kind of generically speakingstigma around it. That will, in my hope, probably fade in the faceof this- can be done safely and well. These are you know. What do you feel like you're up against,and what do you feel like your role is in as a group, you know ndconsolidating some of this tech and really making it more obvious, what'sgoing on when were why how who, in a way that you can easily display forpeople, talk about what you think your role is in continuing to advance thethis movement? Well, I feel like this is what it must have been like back inthe day of prohibition right. I also think it's interesting. You know itdoes have. It's still sometimes does have that stigma of you know. Marijuanamust be illegal and it's the gateway drug. I think that is quicklydiminishing the delivery mechanisms for Cennabis are becoming so much moresophisticated with patches with the CBD selves. You know, if you put this patchon it, will help you just sleep, so I think you know, as as we go through time, thenegative kind of stigmas on cannabis are quickly diminishing and hemp andCBD. It's really interesting, I think some of the real big you know softwareand water, bottlers and manufacturers are looking like okay waybe. We caninfuse CBD into this and we're making clothes out of hemp. Now. So it'sfascinating to see. What's happening D, I think it's becoming much moremainstream. I mean every single pharmaceutical at one point: right camefrom plants and herbs and people swearby, you know their their herbalteas, their ECHINACEA theyre Gulnsright- and this is a similar, and I think whatwe can do as an industry is first of all pres for safe banking, because it'sreally difficult still to start a business when we have banks not willingto play or participate in a legal way around Canabas. So that makes thingsdifficult for our clients for sure. So that State Banking Act is number oneand I think, as an industry, anyone who can call their their senator orgovernment folks o Tryn to press that that would be for sure number. Onenumber two is, I think, like I was saying earlier on the seeto saletracking. It's really important to know what you're putting in your body anwhere it's coming from and you're seeing people get into all kinds oflike specialty this, and that just like you do with like artisan, artisan,breads or you know, sacular bicas is thinking about your mom's, bread andpotinlar exactly and so that's becoming a thingand people people want that transparency.They want to know what they're putting in their bodies and- and I think youknow it's not necessarily something that we even as an industry, have topush it's happening. It's so normal. Now, like people, you know their kidsare ten or eleven. An this eidther want...

...to go Vegan, it's like that was notheard of twenty years ago. So you know, I think, the younger generations andthe transparency that they want. That's just going to happen yeah. So, let's,let's speak to one of your customer segments you can choose which one Iwant to kind of button down between your role, because you really do haveperview over the entire customer life cycle, for whichever segment we want totalk about and you're so clear about how important it is to leave customerswith a a feeling. It could be a feeling of trust or confidence or relationshipor rapport. What do you do as a leader culturally to kind of infuse? That isit in the way you hire? Is it in the way you on board? Are there particularlike a communication cadences or tools that you're using internally to reallymake sure that your team is paying attention to how your customers feel Eten? It all comes back to our teammembers. Obviously, if our employees are not happy and they don't trust andthey're not having a good time, that's just going to you know, follow on toour customers in not a good way right, so it definitely starts with the way wehire the caliber of people. The way we train the way we have fun at work. Thetools that we provide them to have confidence that they can serve servethe clients. Well, it's cultural and it starts at the top. You Know Our CEOJessica Billingsley has a very strong core tenants and core values that getrepeated. We have a mission Monday for companywide. It's a fifteen minute,quick. You know brief kind of get you pumped up for the week. She has beendoing that since before I started and it's again, the reiteration of the corevalues make sure everybody stays focused and on the same page, we have alot of fun, there's so much passion about what we're doing and how we'rereally helping. We help so many people we want people to have better lives,healthier lives. We want people to know what they're putting in and on theirbodies and so to the extent that we stay true to that. It comes ow to theemployees and mensuring our customers, but that translates down and ourcustomers feel the same way. I love it, I'm with you on that. It's funny overthe past, probably two or three months or so. It's always been a backgroundconversation. I mean you can't have a customer experience. Conversationwithout an employee experience conversation, but I feel like Oer thepast couple of months. In particular, I you know the show is impart becomingthe employee experience podcast. I love that Monday message. How does shedistribute that? Is that an email? Is it a podcast? Is it a video like? Howis she distributing thet? It is a live kind of zoom, rink, centrol, video andshe'll rotate it so sometimes she'll do it. Sometimes members of the executiveteam will just want to share something, and it's not always business related.Sometimes it's about work, life balance.

Sometimes it's about like a meditationtechnicq or whatever. Sometimes it's about okay, you know we're launchingthis or here's our new marketing message or yeah and again, because it's only fifteenminutes, you don't feel like it's. You know a meeting, that's stronger e onyeah hipy, it's strong! It's to the point it's in and out. Everyone gets achance to interact and ask questions like there are times it goes, seventeenminutes right, but there are times that it goes thirteen minutes, but it's justa super. Nice Way to energize everyone to strike the week and it's fun. I think people look forwardto it, so yeah she's been doing it for a long time. It's a good good trick.That's awesome! How big is the company in terms of employees and how are theydistributed? And, finally, what has that transition been like for the team,as I assume, if you were ever together in offices you're, probably at home?Now how big are you? How are you orgin to distributed and how is thetransition for you all? Well, obviously, vhen! Now, if you asked me last weekand be a completely different answer, because the acquisition of ampleorganics, we now have amazing, fairly robust team up in Canada, which we didnot have last Ra, O Mi. How big are, we, I say, were fairly small, even all inwere probably around two hundred employees or that I definitely since Istarted, have been advocating pushing the salespeople out of the headquartersin Denver out into the field. So I feel real lucky now that we have a robustsegmentation of people in Florida in California, in Michigan, in Oklahoma,in Latin America, obviously in Canada, so yeah we are distributed across theAmericas and we are back in the office actually in Denver, we have a largeoffice and people can social distance very, very easily, which has been niceto be able to be back in. You know, with masks and a lot of Sanitizer, butto actually be able to see one another and to interact has been super butcontinue to grow. I'm sure there are more acquisitions on the horizon andit's difficult right. I mean, I think, whenever you acquire a company you'reacquiring a different culture, so we've spent a lot of time on. You know, isn'ta good cultural fit even before we make the acquisition, which is you know, oneof the big things we feel so good about John Prentice, the CEO of amplenolpresident of that company, and that team up there it was it's I feel likethey've, been part of us for day, one rigbut cultural issues. It's superimportant when you're making acquisitions and even when you'rebringing someone in because you're inheriting a whole new thing and isit's hard to adopt it is, I think everyone has done a really nice job andit's obviously compounded and making so much more difficult. The fact that wecan't go to Toronto and welcome or to new team members, it's a pain, but yougot to work through it. Thank you for...

...zoom and ring central, and thesevirtual ways we can see each other makes a difference. Yeah. It's reallyinteresting. We you know Bomban. We make it easy to record and send videomessages, so you can send like these little imperson moments out of timelike zoom. We have to be there at the exact same time, similar like it's faceto face, but where I want to go here, is that there's just no substitute forin person? So I'm glad that you all get to see each other, at least in Denverand build that, and I can't imagine how challenging it must be to incorporate,especially because the values and the experience are so important to you all.You know at the core of a Kerna to bring new teams and New People in andto manage. That process. Is that? Is there someone, if particular dedicatedto that I mean? Obviously, you already alluded to the fact that you knowyou're doing really good homework and making sure that you're making a smartacquisition, but because of the the intimate relationship between employeeexperience and customer experience, and the number I mean I'm just going backto the you know: Who's your customer and you're. Like depends. You know whatwe're talking about. You know you're, making a lot of acquisitions any tipsaround incorporating people, in addition to bring them all together atthe beginning of the week and getting everyone on the same page. That way,which is a cool practice, anything else. How are you structurally managing it orany tips you have there? It starts at the top. I mean this is not somethingthat we feel like we can delegate so each executive we own it, we own it asa team. This is not something you can delegate it's a heavy lift, but firstand foremost, is the you know. Well, being the safety and happiness of ouremployees, that's number one, and so each leader has to lean in and justtake the extra steps over communicate. There's no other way to do. It is notsomething that can be delegated. You got to own it because it's you know Iwish we could say. Oh, we just put somemody in charge of that an forgetabout Ityeah that doesn't work that way. So it's extra time it's extra timetogether, we were fortunate that we were able to spend a fair amount oftime with the ample executives prior to the acquisition being announced. Sothat clearly makes things much easier that you spent that in person time weknew we were alived culturally we've had funs together, we've been inoffsites together for a few days. This is before the pandemic, so that wasfortunate. I think it's going to continue to be difficult. It's a newnew day. We offer me very comfortable with video, unfortunately right for annow so yeah yeah. It's been really interesting. This one will be a littlebit, maybe reflective for you perhaps, but it's really hard for me thatsomeone just getting to know you not to make the obvious observation thatyou've built a very successful career in some gigantic companies. I mentionedsome of them off the top SAP HP, seebl systems Nike and now, even throughacquisition, you're only a couple few hundred people. What are some of theleast that you've carried with you from...

...working inside these much largerorganizations. I would assume that they're, probably a bit slower,potentially a bit more political, like what are some of the things that you'vecarried out of there. And what do you think about the contrast? I am Ioverstating the contrast, or is the contrast really there, what are some ofits characteristics? That n? Maybe what have you carried into your experiencehere with a Cerna? That's a great question and hey I mean I think, as aleader, it doesn't matter if you're leading a team of five or a team of onethousand, the core values that you have as a leader needs to be well known andwell communicated. I think the teams very well need to know in thesechanging times of multiple acquisitions. What's going to change and then what'snot going to change and what's not going to change is my core values as aleader what's important to me, those will not change, and so I think it'simportant for the team to understand that and then there's some comfort likeokay, well Nina Stil Nina right and it doesn't matter if we buy. You know amillion companies. I know what her court tendents are. I know what thevalues are. I know how she operates. I know what she expects and I think everyleader inside the accurrent executive team feels the same way and I thinkthat gives employees some comfort and something to center on. You know it isdifficult. You can't, you know, trust for sure needs to be me needs to beearned, so it takes a minute, but I just think continuation of reiteratingand and being very clear on what you stand for as a leader really reallyhelps. You know as you're requiring new team members and new cultures into themix awesome in general. What are you in particular excited about? As you, youknow, we're already in third quarter, we're looking at fourth quarter, we'relooking at two thousand and twenty one. What are a couple things that you'really excited about looking ahead? Well, I'm certainly so I just can'twait to see what happens with in the United States particular with thisstates, especially we're on the you know, we're about to jump into anelection cycle. Canabis is always like a controversial hot topic. So, ofcourse you know we will be. We be watching very closely to see whathappens so I'm most excited to see, what's going to happen in this industrygoing forward through this next election cycle and what the states aregoing to do. I think that's got to be my number one cool. I will be watchingthat with you. Folks. If you are listening and enjoying thisconversation, obviously you're going to want to subscribe to the podcast iscalled the customer experience podcast. You can find it anywhere that youlisten to podcast a couple. A couple of things that I was reminded of in ourconversation Nena, one of them, was episode. Ninety two with Alex Grace,he's the director of sales at Fuda, and we talked a little bit about the pastpresient future of restaurants and commercial properties. They have areally cool business model where they partner with commercial property ownersand local restaurants and bring them...

...together on kind of, like you know,food truckor in the lobby type situations to kind of improve theexperience for the tenants in the building, but then also to createexposure and opportunities for the restaurants, O really neat businessmodel. We had a conversation, thereabout, obviously pandemic informedas some of ours was today and then another one shortly there. Afterepisode, Ninety seven with Bob Barry, he's the principal UX researcher at aSan Francisco based software company called answer lab, although he is hereon the front range where both of us are today and where I am all the time I fonof traveling, which is very rare now, but we had a. We have very extensiveconversation about touchless experiences and connected data and someemerging tech trends and- and I really think what you all are doing in termsof bringing together, either through acquisition and or through Apis andbuilding partnerships with people who are already successful, doing thingsthat you. Maybe you know that classic builder by scenario, but it's build byor plug in Y, think what you're doing is really really smart and is on I'd,be mind blown if if there wasn't a just agreat deal of success here and that you didn't continue to get more interestfrom people who are doing other kind of similar seed, dosail activities yeah.No, I would agree it's going to be fun to watch yeah before I let you go Ninarelationships or our number one core value, our five core values at Bombamarrelationships, humility, fun, flexibility and service. Butrelationships is first, and so I always like to give you the chance to thank ormention someone who's had a positive impact on your life or your career andthen to give like a not or a mention or a shout out to a company or a brandthat you really respect for the way they deliver an experience for you as acustomer yeah. Well, you know no surprise, I'm going to have to go withour CURRENTCEO JESTICA billings Laf, for you know, having a you know, muchlarger company software executive, like myself, come join her year ago, muchmuch smaller team. You know she knew my expertise was in huge enterprisesoftware, and so I thank her profusely for theopportunity and allowing me to be apart and grow a Kerna with her and the otherexecutives. The company Thas stands out to me for excellent customer service.I'm going to have to go with Nortstrom, though the way that they have empoweredtheir employees to help the customer without like runningaround and getting tonues of approvals to view of an issue they solve it, andso I want to go with with Yor strup. You know Seattle base retailer, I knowthey're struggling as most retailers are, but they for me, are one of thegold standards for custmer experience. Yeah, I think, for anyone, who's paidany level of attention or studied it academically or studied it out ofcuriosity would be very hard to go deep without running andenords from multipletimes their fantastic example. And...

...again I like that. You pointed to theemployee, empowerment, piece and employee empowerment to make thingsright period and what what a liberating thing to know that you're going to doright by the customer, and you know that you're going to be backed up whenyou do it it's all. Any of US could could hope for when we show up ti togive our best. Every day I mean if someone wants to follow up on thisconversation, if they want to connect with you or they want to learn moreabout a Kerna. Obviously I mentioned ticker symbol, Kurn Kern, but where'resome other places. You might send folks O to follow up on this conversation.Well, certainly a Curnencom for me personally, you know I'm on Linkdin, soyou can just you know, Nina Samosco and connect with me. I have a personal blogthat some people read. You know, so it's not it's not hard with Googlethese days just to figure it out. So I would love to connect with any of yourlisteners and continued the conversation awesome and again ifyou're listening. This has been a great conversation. We do this every singleweek and I typically throw in a fifth episode. Every month you can subscribeanywhere that you listen to podcast and you can visit Bombomcom podcast. I pullclips from these episodes. I round up links. I 'm going to find your personalblog there Nina and I'm going to link that up in the post that we do. We dolike a little short right up. We inbed the audio and put in some videohighlights and that'll all be at bombob com, sash podcast. So thank you so muchfor listening and Nina. Thank you so much for sharing some time and insightswith us. Thank you. So Much Ethan pleasure to be here with you and youraudience. Much appreciated clear communication, human connection,higher conversion. These are just some of the benefits of adding video to themessages your sending every day. It's easy to do with just a little guidanceto pick up the official book. Rehumanize your business, how personalvideos, accelerate sales and improve customer experience learn more in ordertoday at Bombamcom book, that's Bo, MB, vombcom fuck, thanks for listening tothe customer experience. podcast remember the single most importantthing you can do today is to create and deliver a better experience for yourcustomers, continue. Learning the latest strategies and tactics bysubscribing right now in your favorite podcast player, or visit Bombomcompodcast.

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