The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode 144 · 2 months ago

144. An Actor's Guide to Truthful and Honest Videos w/ Tricia Jane Wiles

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Those of us who feel we’re not very good on camera would rather have someone else present for us. But we’re losing the opportunity to share our passion and expertise with others who could benefit.

In this episode, I interview Tricia Jane Wiles, Marketing Communications / Host of Accelerating Revenue Series at True Influence and former actor at Disney. She shares confidence-building tricks to overcome imposter syndrome and improve video presence.

Tricia also talked with me about:

- What she learned about CX from working at Disney

- Helping others overcome imposter syndrome to appear on video

- The pep talk she gives herself in the mirror to build confidence

- How to improve video presence with voice and posture

Check out these resources we mentioned during the podcast:

- 5 Requirements of Your Video Toolkit with Tricia Jane Wiles and Bob Perkins (AA-ISP)

- Accelerating Revenue Series

- David Lewis (LinkedIn)

- Christian Wiles (LinkedIn)

- Costco

Subscribe, listen, and rate/review the Customer Experience Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play or Google Podcasts, and find more episodes on our blog. Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for The Customer Experience Podcast in your favorite podcast player.

If you feel like you're, going topresent like put on your best freaking outfit, like look like a super star andfeel comfortable feel good about yourself, the single most important thing you cando today is to create and deliver a better experience for your customers,learn how sales marketing and customer success experts create internalalignment, achieved desired outcomes and exceed customer expectations in apersonal and human way. This is the customer experience podcast, here'syour host, Ethan Beaute, getting comfortable in our roles and gettingconfident on camera. When we can do this, we increase the likelihood ofenhancing customer experience through our video communication in live humanto human video calls, and in recorded videos that we might put in emailmessages or social media or blog posts. Today, we've got a guest to help. Sheworks in marketing communications at true influence, a B to be demand, Gen,an account intelligence company that leverages data technology and contentto improve campaigns through identity and intent. She hosts the acceleratingrevenue series of podcast about accelerating B TB revenue and she's anactor singer and voice over artist who earned a bachelor of Fine Arts andtheater performance and worked as an actor for well Disney World Sea world.Orlando and the Orlando Shakespeare Theater among other organizations,trica Jean wiles. Welcome to the customer experience podcast then,thanks for having me it's going to be great to be here. It is this is goingto be an especially easy conversation, a we have a lot of similar interests B.I think I have a lot to learn from your acting background that will apply tothe work that I've been doing for a decade and see you are kind enough tohost beyond the accelerating revenue series. So we've already done it'll beobviously a unique conversation to this one, but we've already spent some timein conversation. How are you today, I'm...

...doing so good? It feels like we'vealready didn't, have the battle, because we know each other. This isnormal conversation. Now it's just two peas in a pad sitting, spitting makingsure were making good conversation all right here. We go so we'll go wherewe'll start where we always start on this show, because it is about customerexperience when I say customer experience. What does that mean to youfor me customer experience? I was thinking about this question. I thinkabout it. In the business mind set, I think about it. In the consumer, mindset and something that's been dear to my heart, of trying new restaurantstraveling. If I'm the customer somewhere. What does it feel like do Iwant to go back to? I want to have some sort of relationship with it individualand if you can make that customer feeling, like they're a part of theconversation that they have their stake in the ground, they have their place inyour business. They have your place as a consumer, whether it is a company orjust a consumer yourself as an individual. I think that's what makesinexperience and experience so mos like what's the atmosphere, what's the vibe?What's what does it make? My Heart feel I'm a very big feelings person. So whenI walk into some place- or if I experience a company- and it makes mefeel something that I'm like okay you're doing something right- I don'tknow what you did but you're doing something right and let me dive intothat later. Yeah! Well done it it. Obviously, the emotional residence iskey there. When you talk about feelings- and does this speak to you, I love thepractical piece of it too is. Does it make me want to come back like if Iwant to come back, then a I felt welcome in the first place I feelconnected. I left feeling good about it. I think you mentioned, like being partof the conversation or being engaged so many good elements there. So one of thethings that we've started talking about immediately when we started talkingabout customer experience on this show over two years and over a hundred andforty episode to go employee experience really came to the forefront right away,and so here, while we're still kind of on CX explicitly in the relationshipbetween ex and C x. One of the questions I'll ask you later is to givea nod or a shadow to accompany your...

...brand that you respect or appreciatefor the experience they deliver for you as a customer, and one of the thingsthat I've heard in asking that question to hundreds of people now or over ahundred people is Disney. People Love Disney Disney's world class they'rementioned in some of the best case. Studies in the best books on the topic-and so I just have to ask, is someone who has worked with that team talkabout on the inside of it. So when people talk about it on this showthey're typically talking about it from the outside, which is, I took my familythere or we subscribe to this thing, or we always feel like Xiz. As someone whohas been part of the organization talk a little bit about how they treat youas an employee. What is on boarding like how do they impart the thoughtsand feelings that you need to have? Is someone representing that brand andcreating that experience like share any of your experience in working with them?So my experience, working with the Welt Disney Company, has been first off ajoy. I and I think, because I was fortunate to be in the Department ofperformance right. I got to work on one of their equity stages and I was at the very front of like the guestwould wave at me and I waved back and I would make their vacation because ofthe role that I play can get into specifics. But, okay, so you can form a character that somefamilies may find familiar absolutely. So if you do a little digging, you'llfigure out you, but it's so much not about me. It was about that characterin that story right, so I got to be right up there face to face sometimeseven getting to meet and greet and create these incredible special momentsand memories for any kid that had or family that had one of thoseopportunities to have that moment be created right and that's incredible tobe at the very pinnacle it feels like, and the thing that they could talkabout for the rest of their vacation and so moving back to like when you became onboarded. They don't lose sight of that...

...moment. Even if you are the personwho's directing the traffic to where you'reparking in the parking lot, even if you're a person who is sweeping up thetrash and debris on the ground and instead you're also creating magicMickey's with hoses when you're cleaning right, there's so manydifferent ways that they've integrated that direct feeling that I got toexperience on the performance, ide and live entertainment when that was backin full swing, they're starting to move back now, which is awesome. I knowevery park is different, but here in Orlando Florida, they're starting tobring back, live entertainment to and they have had it throughout ovid andit's been great to see how they've been able to switch and change and try toadapt, and that is always implemented from my experience from the on boarding.Experience from they have traditions is what they call it. To a point that Ihad a very close friend of mine who used to be with the company as well,and she applied for traditions, her first year and traditions, you can onlyteach it basically can only be the person to lead the on boarding one timein your whole Disney career and there's this whole allocation process andthere's all these different steps and, like you, get passed on and passed onand interviews and interviews, it's very, very high tradition. It's a veryhigh level of respect in the fact that you get to engage with that and the joythat it took to train and to learn. She was telling me about these things. Isaw her big binders. She had to read, and you saw that it's because they tookso much care right at the beginning of the first step. Your first experiencewith the company is learning, and I didn't just learn about my department.I got to learn about all the different kinds of departments, everything elsethat gets to happen and something that they do well, as they call it your onstage and your back stage right. So when you're in front of the guests inthe park, wherever that may be your on stage, so everything is to be a part ofthe protection, and I personally I love that, because we have to flick it onand off right. We have times when we're putting all of our energy into themoment. That's right in front of us and we're being present, and then we alsoget to turn that off and you get to re...

...charge. You get to go on nature. Youget to watch your t V. Show you get to drink a cup of coffee get to spend timein the family like there is an on an off switch and that's okay, becausethat makes you a well rounded presenter actor Salesperson Right, whoeverwhatever role you're feeling you get to have that separation that lets you findout. Okay, what do I need to do backstage to make sure that my ownstage experience is full of genuine joy presence and being present, yeah really good. Two things Iespecially like one is that everyone is on stage. I mean for you as a performer,obviously you're, physically on stage some of that time and then you'reengaging directly with the audience when you're physically off the stagebut you're still on stage. But is this idea that every single person,including the person cleaning the grounds clearing the trash everybody ison stage and that they a honor the role in that way and then be at theexpectations that you're going to honor the traditions of the space in generaland of your role in particular? And the other thing I really like is this ideathat they introduce you to a broader context more than you reallypractically am air, quoting for people who are listening need to know, butinstead this context that will help you have understanding and respect for thecontext in which you're operating m absolutely they do it really well- andI know that things have shifted over the years, and I was fortunate in myacting Cara Down here in Orlando. It got to be one of my many jobs right, soI got to experience different kinds of theme, parks, different kinds oftheaters, and it was always a joy knowing that, in my rule, in my smallperformance roll, my you know, sub hey are you available for a shift and I cancome in and do the job well, that there is always this working machine andthere's all these thoughts and intentions and outlines to how it madethat whole process even happened cool so we'll do a little bit of a gearshift here, although we'll kind of come back to all of these themes, I want todo a drive through this idea of your...

...foray into B, to be marketing andaccount intelligence and intent data. I think anyone who heard thatintroduction is, like you know, performer actress singer on stages. Whyis she would be to be? But but she's also, you know creating content indoing educational videos and sometimes technical and certainly very deep andspecific topics, so really quickly. Tell us a little bit about trueinfluence like what is the company about? What are you trying to get done?Who Do you serve? What should folks know about true influence? Yes, trueinfluence. Well, the joy for trimplet is that we get to help be to be salesand marketing find their next customer, specifically through our to influencemarketing cloud, and that means that we expertly level leverage the data thattechnology, the content to drive these high impact marketing campaign, so thatwe get to help our customers actually win new business and specifically withintent data so that we can help our customers be so specific and directwith their marketing, and we get to solve problems for them by boiling downto creating these campaigns around what their marketing needs are bydetermining who they want to reach, whether that be through Pirmin ordemographic or techno graphic identifiers. We help them launch theirown campaigns through things like content, syndication or PROGRAMMIdisplay advertising. So it's all about getting to their customer. Who Do theywant to reach what's their message and how can they help right? And so we'reable to turn that data on we're able to use the two influence marketing cloudto allow for these cross channel marketing and selling so providing thisreally high engagement for our customers, as well as the ability topersonalize b Tob Strategies and then gain that real time analytics andinsights. So they can actually implement them into the multiplemarketing campaigns, which is joy so that they can really find their nextcustomer, which is awesome. It's all about for me, it's all aboutstorytelling at the end of the day,...

...because we're helping another ourcustomers find their customers really good. So I'm going to go out on a limband you can correct me, but I can imagine that when you made your wayinto this organization and into this rule- and you found yourself creatingvideo content to probably help true influence find their next customer. Inaddition to helping the customers, you already have that there might have beensome impostor syndrome or something to it. So I just in my own experience, I rememberthe first time I did a web that was industry specific and I'm like I've.Never worked in that industry before, but I know a lot about video and I knowa lot about email marketing, but I still felt like a pretender, eventhough I got really positive feedback. So that's my long way around what typesof video are you creating? How do you go about getting over? You know this.Isn't your background? You didn't. You know you weren't raised by B to bemarketers, I'm going to assume and you didn't go to school for this. You Dlike this is your first job really in this space, and so what types ofcontent are you producing in addition to the podcast, and how do you go aboutgetting enough of a handle on it that you can do so with confidence and I'll also add one layer of a qualifierhere for people who we are you and I are going to be talking about howpeople can get more confident on camera in order to connect and communicatewith the people who matter most to their success? Yeah- and I want peoplelistening to hear your story through this Lens, which is you obviously had confidence, probablyhad some confidence on camera and you were in what was maybe more challengingfor you was getting a handle on the content itself and I think a lot of thepeople who are going to be trying to implement the ideas that you share withus are probably confident in the material actually, but they lack theconfidence to communicate it on camera. So I just now just see I and you shareyou talk about that dynamic. I love that now you absolutely hit the nail onthe head of that's. That was absolutely...

...the opposite. For me, I was a hundredpercent confident on camera because I went to school for this, I've beendoing commercials or it's always been a part of my career and the opposite. Ifelt like I didn't know what I was talking about. So the first thing,which is great- you mentioned one thing. You said I assume you weren't raised byB, be marketers. My Dad actually has been in marketing automation for thepast ten years, and I only over, like the past three years, really understoodwhat he did when once I got here into Turnin's to I'm like Oh my Gosh, youget it now like as an a greater jim wait. I need that jest. It was wrong.Okay! No! But it's like an eighth grader. I was like my dad helps makethe button click the thing to the thing, and now I'm like. Okay, I get a Wat, Iget what he does now, but you're absolutely right. I think the joy of beamed somebody who has a completelydifferent background in to Bab and letting me walk into marketing, which,over the past year has been myy eyes, have been opened. Thatmarketing is just storytelling were all just telling stories, because we all ashumans. How do we communicate? We tell stories like how do we gain trust? Howdo we open up ourselves? How do we create vulnerability and Create Trust?We tell stories so having that link together and being like? Oh that's whatI did as an actor. I could. I can do that here. It just looks in a differentin a different way, so we talk about impostor syndrome. ForMyself, I think that I had to make sure one. I was being educated and beingsupported shot up to my first boss team leader, Karo Ford. She is incredibleand she's content queen over at true influence and she writes the blogs. Ithas a whole team working underneath her and when I started hosting the podcastand the accelerating revenue series I would check in with her. We would lookat the guests. We do. The research of the guest and we'd also outline thequestions, and we framed it up as we want to know from our guests whatinsights they can bring right and the episodes gets to be about them becausewill tresa with her acting background,...

...she's, not she's, not in the deep ofthe weeds of Petav for ten years. However, I love conversation. I couldtalk to a brick wall a day, so, okay, what are my strengths and how do I? Howdo we position that so that I have this? We actually have usable content, and Ithink that that was something that helped me get over. That Hump is thatyou don't know until you don't know, and so you just got to try and when you were talking about a lot ofpeople, have the weight, let they know what they're talking about, but they're,not comfortable on camera. That makes me so excited, because who better totalk about the thing that you're passionate about that you know andyourself and so for me, getting comfortable on camera is the idea ofeven doing it right now and people are going to think I'm crazy. So as we arerecording this, your video box is like down here in myeyesight right. If I look down I'm looking at you on my screen, Nope, I'mlooking at the camera, the kids, whoever is watching this they're, likeOh man, she's engaged she's. Looking at me, it's like she stared into my cell.You just got to trick your brain, because I know that you're there I canhear you. I can like see you out of the corner of my eye, and these are justweird tricks and tips of like in acting school they'd, be like make the camelyour best friend like stare into the wind like all these little sayings andphrases. It's just the technical work right. It's just getting comfortable with yourselfgetting comfortable with your your body, and I mean that body awareness like howmuch do you move your hands? Do you talk with your hands? Where do you moveyour face? What what makes you feel good and comfortable? So it's bringingall those things to the table that kind of help you support, so I very longwent it way. I also talk around in circle, so I hope I answered thequestion, but that was the main starting point of like the research andthe preparation, research and the knowledge of making sure I was comingto these conversations with a fully lined up question said, so I couldactually ask questions and then, in B...

...to b it is very complicated. We usetons of ACRIMA, you said ex and CX and my brain had to go like ex okay, yeahyeah, I get it like. I had to retell myself. I know that I know what thismeans and we talked so quickly and we use all these acronym, but at the endof the day, humans- and we know what we're trying to say, we can boil itdown to layman's terms. So that's been very helpful for me as getting into theindustry being like what is this saying? What is this big phrase with all thesebig words and all these very specific technical beatae things? What is it?What is it? What is it? What does it mean damp the core and so then, as wecontinued on and creating, we have our quartery summits that we produce andwe're getting ready for the next one. There's been tricks for that too. Iused to memorize scripts about what the summit was going to be about and createshort form videos to say, hey. You know called Action Register for the summit.Here's an engaging video and the first one we did was around January. So inthe preparation I got to do like a Christmas theme, I got to do some likehappy new year themes and as an actor. I would memorize these scripts. Let metell you: My brain went sideway, sometimes because I'd be memorizingscripts about data and market in sales and predictable, and this and therepetitive words that were not so easy to like it wasn't a feeling. It wasn'ta emotional. I have to tell you this or not so then for summit to what do we do?What's my too, I have a teleprompter now and so now I know how to readthings: How to put inflection when you're reading, I think about it likewhen you're reading a story to a kid like and you're reading, a bed timestory. You know that you have to like go up and go down like there's naturalways of story telling that everybody is is used to, and you have to find thatcenter point. That makes you feel comfortable and so I'm very happy touse a teleprompter because I'm not dead on camera, so to speak. So it's beenreally cool to have those tools, kind of come in and change the things that Ican do and create the concept that I can create. I know I have more answers,but I'll, let you ask another question when I get more into it, so you alredyshared several really useful tips for...

...folks in there, but we'll get reallyexplicit here moving forward in the conversation, I want to start withsomething that you wrote. I don't remember whether I took it off linkedin or whether I took it off your personal website or your professionalwebsite, but I find joy in helping others understand how to presentthemselves truthfully and honestly and what I would add to that is inparentheses, despite the challenges of being online and on camera. Talk about the word choice there oftruth and honesty like. Why are those things I mean at the sake of asking theobvious at some level like talk about the blend of how important those thingsare and why that isn't our default like? Why do we? Why do you need to helppeople do that? I chose those words one because the wordauthentic makes me cringe right now, because it's everywhere in marketing,it's everywhere in any sort of dialogue and true and honest, sound it more more,genuine and more to to the heart center. I think when we're truthful withourselves, you got to let yourself first right, so something on camera.People Are we're afraid of ourselves were especially, I know, I've done itsure other people have done it. When do you think about when you listen toyourself on a voice mail or you leave a message for the first time you like, ohmy gosh, it sounds so different on the phone. Well, there's scientificalreasons. Why? Because there's like missing wave Lance, I believe I read itsomewhere. I could be totally saying this incorrectly, but you do sounddifferent on the phone. So before were and it's okay, you sounddifferent, but putting yourself in a space where there is no other human inthe room and you're, not feeding off of human energy you're, not looking atbody language you're, not looking at their posture, their eye contact theirphysical presence instead you're on a screen on a camera, it's harder to readright it. He takes more, very specific, observant things to check out. Okay.Are they about to have a conversation? Okay, I can step back, but that alsomeans like how are you presenting...

...yourself? So some people, we do thesethings subconsciously and we have body presents or we havefacial presents or whatever that might be so consciously. That would affectthe way that we present ourselves on camera and we feel again presenting. Sotruthfully, honestly, if I come to work- and I haven't taken time to even ifit's just brush my hair- maybe put a bobby pin- maybe not they put to make abomb- maybe not, but I'm wearing an old shirt or something of that and I don'tfeel prepared it's going to affect my day job, and I figured this out when Iwas in college and I would go to rehearsals and you're in a room wherefriendy musicals, we were doing hair spray at the time and you're in a roomfull of mirrors, because you're doing all these massive dance, mens and hairspray is like the dancest of all the dances and white girl here. So I wasone of the council, kids and Corny collen show if you haven't seen herspray watch, it's amazing and that is you're staring at yourself for four hours after classes all day andbefore that you're an acting class and you're, usually in a room full a mirror,sometimes too, if it's a movement class. If it's a voice and speed your actingclass, so you have to get used to yourself, I'm pretty comfortable selflike real quick. So what are the things that I find that make me comfortable?What makes me feel good and my own body, my presence great. I know that I alwayswear my hair on this side. Fun fact if I were to face the camera and presentthis way, I'm closing myself off. You literally are seeing hair, that'scovering my face, and it's affecting you in a different way. If I open upthis way, you're seeing more of this, it's more of my actual face more of myexpressions and that's like something very small that I feel put together, Ifeel good. I feel comfortable on myself. I feel relaxed so that I can presentwell. I can communicate well, and so those are things that I've just pickedup along the way you have to get really comfortable with yourself being allthese different characters, playing all...

...these different roles, bringingyourself to that character and that role as an actor. And so how do we pushpast having somebody else present for you, because they're better on camera,they're more comfortable on stage? You know they're a better public speakerthan you are now. You have the knowledge. You have the insight youhave the worth to bring forward. So how do you cut become relaxed? What is anervous tick? You have. Do you tap your feet? What's your body awareness?What's your speech awareness? You know I've had to learn. I talk around incircles, and so I warm people be like I'll get to my point. I promise it'sright here, but I'm Goin to back Tis yeah I'll get back to it. So is thatanser question yeah so for folks were listening. We put video highlights upat bomboost. Tristia was demonstrating some things that might be better seenthan heard, so you can always go there and check some of these out, especiallyon an episode e Ketis One. I want to knock down a misperceptions that Ithink a lot of people have and you've already spoken to it a little bit. Imean you mentioned the rules that we all play in our lives right, we'restill the same person at our core, but we're different when we're on the phonewith a potential customer, maybe than we are when we're on the phone with acustomer or with a team member or when we're on the phone or a video call withour spouse or a friend or a family member were different as a parent weredifferent. As someone standing in line waiting to order coffee like we haveall these different roles that we play but we're still ourselves, and so Iwould love for you just to go straight at this idea of acting as an authenticact versus acting as faking, something I think the misperceptions is thatacting is about in authenticity and faking things and being something orsomeone you're. Not. But I don't think that's the case. Soit's not yeah yeah and somebody kind of opened my eyes to like the language toput to it recently, which was very...

...helpful, and I don't remember who sowhoever it was. Thank you, but as an actor, you have all right. We're goingto get down into are going to break it down when you get a script and you havea role: A is as a character every time that you are on stage, you have a want,you have an objective and then there's a way that you're going to get what youwant. There's a tactic and if you put that in your real life, put yourselfright before you go to work in the morning when you wake up, what do youwant? I want water. I want to get ready. I would like to brush my teeth right,prepare yourself and get ready for work. That's what you want. Your tactics,great, I'm Goin to get water, I'm going to verse teeth, I'm going to feedmyself right. Those are the ways that you get it and then there's obstaclesin the way man. My water doesn't work. Today. Okay, I have to drink bottledwater right like it goes down to. We do this every single day. It's sometimesnot that exciting! It's! I want to read a book, so you sit down and read a book,and we don't really want to make a play about that. So you just see the mostintense highest stakes moments in live theater. Let's take a play, for example,so each roll each character of it's a wellwritten script and show should know who they are to their core. They shouldhave a moral code so that what they want and how they get it is reallyreflected about who they are to their core, and that was very helpful to me tounderstand that concept where that's where the real human is like. You can'tmake a fake human like people, don't want to be evil. So if you have an evenvillain and you're like I'm going to play the LEVAL, it's like that doesn'tmake sense like that's think it doesn't make sense. They want something andthey're going to do it this way because they're going to risk it all to get iteven if that means being evil right. So it brings it back to a realness and amoral code and a genuineness that all humans have that we all we all do thisevery single day. We just don't bring attention to it, and so man there wasthe second part to your question. Anyway, I was going to unpack it for areason. Help me again with this yeah it...

...was. It was just this idea of acting as an act of authenticity ratherthan an active inauthenticity right because of the in just the rules islike the parallel to it like we all already do this anyway, it's justsomehow. We think that you know getting on camera. We mean we need to besomeone different yeah, and I think I love what you said about a way that youtalk to a CO worker, a friend, a boss, a child like whoever that might be. So.I believe that I've put safety mechanisms up in my life and I've hadto break those downs right. I've put in my hi, my name is Tresham calling aboutI've, put those voices on because that's a I'm, a light, friendly you'regoing to want to talk to me like like no and then other people. It's like hey.What's up, I want to have a conversation, it's relaxed it's naturaland it's I'm not putting that effort forward to make it sound like somethingelse to make it sound pleasant to you, I'm just being myself. So I've had tobreak that down for myself when I'm talking to somebody and leadershipwatch my tonus beat like watch my speed of speech. You know there's different,there's different places that would get to use these different. I don't want tocall them voices but approaches language approach. You know you willyou will talk differently to your spouse than you do to a child than youdo to your boss, but usually what do you want to learn from your boss? Whatdo you want to get from your boss like? Do you need their approval on something,and then I always flips around? Where are they? What are they listening to?What are they doing? In their life, how are they approaching your day? How arethey approaching your meeting and then great now take that to business andcustomers. If you're talking to somebody else, how many sales callshave they made that day? Are you selling them a product that is gonnareally fit there? One thing that's going to go off with the hitch: that'sgoing to make their marketing plants going to make their boss happy it'sgoing to meet their quote, it's going to do their thing and then they have agreat weekend. They get to cusped with their family and friends. So as much asyou have to focus on yourself, you have to almost work extra hard to focus onthe other person. Where are they coming...

...from? What's their position and thentry to read between that and so being yourself and fighting through thetechnology, so that means for me. I I'm going to go here with the subconscious.I have trying to ask questions and see: Do you get aggravated even when he subconsciously? If someone has a bad microphone or poor video quality, doesit distract you have you found that that's something as you've been workingon video that that has kind of come to the forefront that you get more likeagitated or frustrate, and you don't know why, when you got a a call- andyou can't hear someone clearly, I do, I would say the single biggestfrustrating confusing thing is: probably this blend of the Mike mightbe fine. The camera might be fine, but the Internet connection is such thatyou drop a couple of extra words and now my brain is like working quadrupleover time to fill in the gaps and you know, did I miss a whole sentence, ordid I just miss a phrase or a word or two, and and that kind of thing I willsay yes, it's funny I used to feel like getting nicer. Equipment was a vanityplay for my own benefit, so that- and this is so interesting the way itparallels your previous response there, which is- and maybe that's why you tookit here and triggered this monologue a youthink. Her now is, I used to thinkthat it was about me and making sure that my video looked awesome, butreally what it's about nicer equipment. I've come to understand is aboutbringing people directly into the scene and eliminating any of the confusion,eliminating any of the gaps making. My changes in inflection easier to hearmaking changes in my in my pasture or my facial expressions easier to see andunderstand. I think that's why turning out lights is so helpful, it's not justso that you look better for your own benefit and when you look at yourselfon your screen as I'm doing right now, you feel better about it. It does playat that level, but it also plays at...

...this other level of you're building thebridge. So the other person can come across and meet you M and you'retotally right. It's why I brought it up and that comfortabilisme I I feel veryarmed. I have A. I have a very fancy rig that I got from David Lewis, whodoes the demand Gen radio and demand Gen TV. He was one of my guests andaccelerating revenue and for the pre interview before I even said Hello. Hejust turned on his video and his might- and I thought, Oh, my gosh. What areyou using and I didn't even say hello? I was like, oh my sorry, hi, I'mTristia. I got distracted by your great video quality because I was using likelaptop and you know headphones and host in a podcast and hey. You got to learnsomehow and so like. I have a rig where, like I literally, have an external, abig camera lens that blurs my background. So you're not like you seeit, but you're not distracted right, hitting the subconscious thing forthose who are listening to podcast. I'm sorry again, please watch the videoclips because I'm obviously not being very helpful right now, but the ring light. I have that sittingon top of the Lens so like I actually have light that's directly in my centerand people can put it on the stand to, but it works for me. I just place itover my camera and then put my right Mike Right. Next to me, and I feelprepared, sat ready and I can have a normal conversation and you're so right,ethen, I especially coming from stage work to oncamera B to b work. You make one move on stage. One physical like an mycharging at you is. Am I attacking you with my physical presence and mycowering like there's all these different things with your body,language that we all do and I'm sure that people were meetingthe office you could tell, and someone was having a bad day and they justneeded a little bit more space, and so you kind of sat next to them and youslowly interest in with your words and you slowly kind of open that and kindof unboxed, whatever they were dealing with and their body language seteverything, because that's what we do we have. We have these safetymechanisms. We comfort ourselves. I...

...really need to study more about thisbecause I'm just kind of saying stuff and not brand, you, the the the statsof the Miss About that I'm not licensing any of this, but as an actor,you see it right. How are you open, how are you comfortable, and so now withvideo? How can you prepare yourself so that you can still get as much of thatjuicy goodness of the human reaction to human interaction, but through a cameraand through a screen and through, like porfilio things out of the corner ofyour eye, inflection tone and I'm right there with you? I totally agree thatthe equipment is not for our sake. It's so that people really can be enteredand you can see depth and you feel like you're having a conversation with anindividual, not just staring at another zoom screen yeah it well to your point.It is also about you and your confidence. I like that layer of itvery much. I was actually going to ask you about that, but you alreadyanswered it is like. I noticed how nice or video quality was the first time weconnected, and but I I didn't ask the story, but you already shared it, whichis awsome, so add a link to that episode. Yeah have Omboo such podcast,so people can learn what he has to share. You did a session with BobPerkins with the A I S, p American Association of Inside SalesProfessionals, for folks who aren't familiar great organization, we partnerwith them on a lot of stuff, so you did a session with him. He broke down likefive topic categories. I'll probably go find that and im bed that in thisblogosphere, the one I want to leave people with a few practical tips on isthe one on improving our personal presence. The way we move our voice.Our manner of speech now you've already alluded to a couple of these things andbeing aware of it. You already talked about the idea which I didn't know.I've never been in enacting class that in some of these rooms and sessions andpractice sessions that there are mirrors everywhere, which makes methink about the sheer exposure effect of like people not seeing themselves on camera,often enough kind of a scenario like getting getting familiar andcomfortable with yourself. You already...

...talked about how you developed your ownstrength inside your own physical presence, partly through that mereexposure, but anyway m talk about improving physical presents throughmovement voice speech, just like three or four, whatever comes to mind likequick tip ideas, things that most people, even if they are obvious, asyou say them most of US- would overlook it and the only reason they're obviousis because you said it, it pulled it out of our. You know our intuition intoour indoor, conscious awareness, absolutely so I'll hit voice first anda tip that I use when creating short form videos or even hosting theaccelerating revenue series, and this is the crazy one. But if you are presenting making a point having aconversation and you're going to feel nervous like I've to talk on camera andthere's a zoomorphic looking at me, I do this. I literally go and look in themirror and practice a monologue or whatever what my intro is- and I lookat myself and I'm like do. I believe myself am I comfortable with my speechpattern and myself do I feel, like I'm rushed? Do I feel like I'm, I'm not,and that's just something that makes me happy and makes me comfortable, becauseif I can have joy experiencing like and talking to myself in the mirror yeah itsounds crazy all but like just try it and let me know if it works for you, itworks for me it brings it back of where's my speed. Where are my eyeslooking at, I twitching a lot and I going back and forth right. I speak areally fast hear and then slow down. Really here do I say lots of ums lotsof ands. That's a you know, vocal inflections and piecesand place holder words right. so that's that's vocal for you right there.Secondly, I'm going to take this from Timothy Wiles, my my brother, yes,because he presents a lot for his work online too, and he talked in our townhall meeting recently about it's it. He loves the color blue and he looksreally good in the color blue, and so, whenever he's giving a demo of anythingand whenever he is speaking to somebody...

...else and presenting he always was ablue shirt because he wants to look good in that. So I would say do that ifyou feel like you're going to present like put on your best freaking outfitlike look like a superstar and feel comfortable, feel good about yourself,and if you don't have that, I invested in like three like short, sleeve turtle,necks that I can put underneath like blazers or other things or likesweaters, and I'm like cool here's. My Standard, I'm hosting the podcastshirts, like I actually have like my work closet, because I hose so manyepisodes and I'm like Great Im away in this one today. This is one of them.It's not distracting, but I feel good in it and then for the rest of yourbody. If you like standing, I would say: Try Standing Desk, try ver Tas desk. Isometimes use it. I want it to sit today and I thought about it before Ijumped on this. I was like. AH, should I stand it's like? No, I'm want to feelgrounded and for some reason I chose to sit, but it's like great do the weirdthings, and I mean the weird thing stretch your arms out- see like how howbig is your Zoom Room? How big is your screen like? Where is your physicalpresence? Do you like talking with your hands, be comfortable with that findgood placement feel comfortable in your skin and your body, and then the lastthing I would say, is your background in your presence, if you don't like thefact that there's like some papers or something somewhere or you don't likethe outlook of your camera, like you, can literally put your laptop on top oflike shoe boxes, books, something that make you you're. Looking at me straighton you've seen my head, you see my shoulders you're, not looking at mefrom like this angle or this single, like your it's as if you're sittingacross the table right for me, because this camera is right at my eyesight, soI don't have to struggle. I don't have to move my body around a lot to kind ofget that good angle and be present with you. I can look off to the corner ifI'm thinking and that's fine, because we do that all the time is humans, butthen I get to come right back to center and be present. So I hope those arethree active ways too. Just get...

...comfortable with yourself and lastthing. You can hide yourself on these calls.There are ways just check put the Little Free Dat. I'm sure you can hideyourself and you can take that out of the equation. If you want to the otherthing, is that we're not looking at you as much aswe're listening to what you're, bringing and that's been huge of? This is howyou look if you want to change it change it. If you don't great but likeyou still got to show up every day, and where are you right now and what's onthe inside, that really matters so like be yourself make it be present. If youwant to change things, go for it, but no one else is judging you as much asyou're, judging yourself, a hundred percent, how many times wo judgeyourself every single day, and we got to stop that. We got to call it out. Wegot to put things in our life. To say great. I see that I'm judging myselfand that's okay and I choose this direction, but it is something whereyou really do bring the value because of your life experience your ten yearsat Bombombay to people you have the title of chief evangelist. I didn'tknow that people could get jobs as a chief, a vangelist in college. I justthought that was for preaching the Gospel, which is amazing, but you knowlike the fact that, like that's your job title Ethan, like how cool is thatthat you've been working for ten years at something and have so much value tobring to the table. So that makes me think what about all the other peoplewho have just as much experience in life in general that gets to bring thatto the table. So many good themes. In this conversation, I so appreciate yourkind of tripling down on presents. I think that is the big missingingredient in so much video communication, whether it's a live zoomcall, whether it's a video that someone's putting up on linked inwhether it's a video and an email or a message, is that we haven't done thiswork. The other thing you did so nicely throughout the whole conversation istalk about just being a little bit, conscious of it to the point that wecan make an adjustment and then it then...

...it becomes our natural habit. The wholegoal of squaring up your physical presence and being comfortable in yourbody. Getting your equipment and your lighting, whatever kind of basicallyset up, releasing any expectation of perfectionbecause you're the only one that holds it. Nobody else does knowing yourcontent in believing in your own expertise and once all those things aresquared, then you can just show up and be president, and that is how we notonly connect with people effectively not only communicate with people moreeffectively, but that ultimately becomes persuasive, because thatpresence going all the way back to your definition of customer experience. Thatpresence is what makes people feel a welcome and be like engaged with andsee like they want to come back and so really love the themes that you broughthere for folks who are listening. If you enjoyed this conversation withTrich, I've got two more that I know. You'll enjoy episode. One and thirtywith John Sweeney. John, is an awesome. Dude he's up in Minneapolis he's theowner of the brave new workshop, which, which is an improve theater, but healso runs a speaking and consulting and training business out of it, and wecalled that episode episode, one and thirty with John Sweeney. The mind setof Im province sales, we wind up talking a lot like you and I did tricaabout being present about being more effective on camera. A lot of goodvideo tips there and you and I didn't talk about improve, but I would go outon a Lim an say: You probably did some improvisational work in earning adegree and be con station for folks who are listening. She said a little, butshe was, of course, meaning a lot so episode hundred twenty seven, a fewepisodes earlier with Darrel prayle. If you spend time on linked in you mightknow, Darrell he's a prolific video user, podcast Er he's chief revenueofficer at Vanilla, soft. We called that three CX strategies for Cros, butwe also talked about his own presence online through podcast, ING and videoand how he's equipping and enabling his...

...team members to do the same, so youmight enjoy one thirty or a hundred and twenty seven trition. This has beenawesome. I still appreciate your perspective and you sharing some of thejourney. You've been O. I love the dive in to Disney in particular, was excitedfor that and it didn't disappoint before I let you go I'd love for you toshare two more things with us. The first is you thinking or mentioningsomeone who's had a positive impact on your life or career, and the second isa Nadera shout out to a brand or company that delivers a greatexperience for you as a customer. HMM, okay! So I'm going to go close to homefor the person who's had an impact on me personally and in my career, andthat part of it is what we talked about earlier is actually my dad and he didnot stop me from pursuing a degree in theater and getting my actual collegedegree in that and his background to. He is an incredible musician and didn'tget to pursue that fully in college as like a career and and dat a shiftandchange. But it's been someone when I've either either have gotten to work with,or I've gotten to have honest conversations with and man theencouragement of pulling out what you don't believeabout yourself. That impostor syndrome of you can do so much more than youthink, and you got to surround yourself with people who will be able to behonest with you and pull that out. Yes, of course, where you can learn and grow,and you can practice, but my dad has been incredible to do that honestly andjoyously, not just because he's my dad, but because we get to have realconversations and create music to together. So it's been a joy. Actually,if you check out, there is a parody song of what do you doing next year andB to be that I created last year and if you watch the video, my dad is the onewho's playing the guitar and for the whole track in my dillie music videothing, and I got to do it for one of our summits. So in fact that I got toeven make music with him with work which incredible so. Thank you. DadChristian miles he's amazing and then the brand- and this is going to be sodifficult- and I hate that I'm going to...

...say this, but I'm still going to saythis, I'm going to say Cosco reason being this is an unexpected one. But myhusband is a fantastic chef and he's to a point that,like we are really good in our budget right now- and we are very honest aboutwe love to travel and we love to eat out. Food is very passionate, his hismom and his dad. They both have taught him a lot and his grandfather and like you, should have a casco. You canmeal prep, you can like get things in bulk and get really good quality ofthings, and so, every time when we were dating he'll be like Oh yeah, I went toCasco and I would make the joke of like it's his favorite store, but just likewe were able to buy the alcohol for our wedding and then return it and like allof these unused things like just they do it right and they're they're therefor what you need, and they have a very specific people that they serve kindsof people, selling things and book selling things in wholesale and itmakes sense and they could Jab Casco. We like we like going back to Cascowhen it's not too busy, not to credit. You got to go out, he the nice timesand there's a nice experience, but it helps his meal prep, which makes we getto spend more time at home together and we get to have great cooked meals andI'm learning how to cook more and be more of a chef versus a cook and havingthat male prep to kind of experiment with the Samman or the stake at thepork. I know it's all the human stuff, but at the end of the day, after doingmy job, I want to go, spend towne with my family and CASCA. Let me do that. So.Thank you. Loving. I LOVE COSCO myself. I could probably go five minutes on allof the very or ten right S. I love about COSCO, but the one thing I willsay for people who are interested in an employee experience in investing inyour employees as a way to benefit your customers. Costco is a living case,study great choice. I love it for folks who enjoy this conversation trition.Where would you send them to learn more about you or true influence or thepodcast or any of the other content you produce? Where a couple places peoplemight go to learn more a couple places...

...linked in for sure, I'm up there onLincon it's only been the past year. I've been kind of moving in Girvinbecause I was on the other socials and I kind of shut that down and said linkin for B to be it's great to influence to influence com, obviously reach outto me. If you want and then you can find the accelerating revenue series onyou tube or on any of your favorite podcast ing platforms, we actually haveall love season, one up on podcast form season to specifically on Yutu andseason to is on podcast as well and garing up for season three. So I'mdoing the plans right now, which is super exciting, so the interweb justjust google us o me you'll, find us we're. There sounds good. I will roundup a few links at bomboost. She is Tristia, Jane wiles. I am Eth andbeaute. We appreciate you spending this time with us and thank you so much forsharing your insight. Tisha. Absolutely thanks for having me on even clearcommunication: Human Connection, higher conversion. These are just some of thebenefits of adding video to the messages your sending every day. It'seasy to do with just a little guidance to pick up the official book.Rehumanize your business, how personal videos, accelerate sales and improvecustomer experience learn more in order today at bombance Buck, that's B, O M BBomb Com book thanks for listening to the customer experience. podcastremember the single most important thing you can do today is to create anddeliver a better experience for your customers, continue learning the lateststrategies and tactics by subscribing right now in your favorite podcastplayer, or visit Bom Bombo podcast t.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (159)