The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode 116 · 1 year ago

116. Closing Both Loops with Voice of the Customer w/ Lauren Culbertson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Customer success’s job is to close the little loop — to solve the individual’s problem. But it’s the role of product marketing to close the big loop and adapt company strategy by listening to and acting on the voice of the customer.

In this episode, I interview Lauren Culbertson, Cofounder & CEO at LoopVOC, about how companies can unify their teams around the voice of the customer.

Lauren and I chat about:

- The 2 loops and how to close them

- Sources of customer feedback (the importance of natural language processing)

- Where to position VOC in your org

- Data sources and segmentation: NPS, online reviews, and Salesforce notes

Subscribe, listen, and rate/review the Customer Experience Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play or Google Podcasts, and find more episodes on our blog.

You need to make sure that youcan trust the data. That is critical. But at the same time, youknow this, this kind of movement towards agility, and especially in thisSASS world, agility over action of a perfection, is really the mantra thatwe take with our customers. The single most important thing you can do todayis to create and deliver a better experience for your customers. Learn how salesmarketing and customer success experts create internal alignment, achieved desired outcomes and exceed customer expectationsin a personal and human way. This is the customer experience podcast.Here's your host, Ethan Butte, using customer feedback to drive better business decisions. That seems foundational to a better customer experience and better outcomes for everyone.Right. Well, that's what today's guest in her team are focused on everysingle day. She spent seven and a half years at black bought in salesmarketing APPS and product marketing roles. Today she's cofounder and CEO of loop vocwhere her team builds market intelligence and Voice of the customer software to help companiesunify their teams around the customer. Lauren culberts and welcome to the customer experiencepodcast. Yes, thanks so much for having me here then. Yeah,I'm really excited for the conversation. I love what you're up to. You'resolving a legitimate challenge that anyone spending time in service of the custom were thinkingabout it, working on. It has encountered before. So I'm really excitedto share your story of the kind of the motivation to found the company.But before we get into it really quick, you know you did your Undergrad atClemson in their school of business and you did an MBA UNC Chapel Hill. Talk about that master's degree experience from a customers perspective. How was it? Did it meet expectations, to exceed expectations? How has it served you? It's when you ask about that because I was just spending the weekend andrally, which is right by Chapelon and Durham, so I was reflecting onit a bit. Actually, so good. Yeah, but you know, Ichose to do non traditional programs. I did an executive program and thatallowed me to continue kind of my work at Black Bod and also go toa school that was beyond what I could go to if I just stayed localin Charleston there's not as many options, and so really what I was wantingto get out of the program was exposure to other leaders, kind of understandingmore about if I want to take the leap in entrepreneurship by, you know, sharpening my skills where I might be weaker and and yeah, just reallylearning from leaders from different places. But is what an executive programage can do, and all of those things were absolutely met. I am one of their, you know, a very happy customer. They've had made you promotion videos,so I'm probably on their extreme I'm definitely a promoter. But but yeah, really great experience. I love it and it really is. I meanyou just kind of an underlying theme that I just picked up there, ofcourse, something that I think we all experience when we have a good customerexperience, which is the relationships with all of the people involved, from,you know, in this case, your fellow customers, the service providers andthe people in support of the entire experience. I'm glad you're just reflecting on that. Yeah, so let's go really high level customer experience. When Isay that to you, Lauren, what does it mean? What does itconjure? What comes to mind. Yeah, so I was reflecting on this alittle bit today and to me customer experience has so much to do withbrand and I think that's often very overlooked. We a lot of times see itas operational and when you first ask that question, what comes to mindis like, Oh, it's the sum of all the touchpoints of an activitythat a company has with its customers. But really that's so transactional and whatcustomer experience is to me it's how a customer gets value from your brand andthat starts at the very beginning of the first interaction. They ever see,a social post that they might see how...

...sales is setting expectations in the salesprocess. A lot of times we start thinking about customer experience when someone becomesa customer, but a lot of times forget about why, how their expectationswere even set in the first place, which, of course, satisfaction,like you already mentioned, is you know what extations did you said with themand where they exceeded or did you fall short? And expectations are usually setin beginning in the sales process. So to me it's that whole brand experienceof how your positioning value and then how you're actually delivering on it. Loveit. So obviously an important if we are going to pay attention to it, work on it, improve it, cross functionally, etc. Then we'regoing to be talking about voice of customer, and so obviously that's the VOC andloop VOC. So give us a quick whether you want to take itas a definition or something else for folks that aren't very familiar with the term. Maybe they've heard it, but they're not, you know, in ateam that focuses on it or uses it off. And what is Voice ofcustomer and perhaps what is its relationship to customer experience? I'll tell you whatvoice of customer is not. First, Voice of customer is not surveys.So a lot of times when people think about voice of the customer, theythink the box is checked because they send out a survey, or even abunch of surveys that ask how are we doing, even if it's MPs,understanding what customers need from them? Voice of the customer is a lot moreprogrammatic than that and really a lot more embedded and how you are naturally doingbusiness with your customers. And so it means listening to places where they're alreadygetting feedback. So I think a voice of customer kind of three steps andit's almost more of a hierarchy, because the last one is the hardest toget to. So the first step is just listening or feedback collection, andthat can be from surveys, absolutely are still a good channel, but italso is making sure that you are listening when things come up and sales calls. There's great tools like Gong that can make that even easier. It istaking feedback that you're seeing an online reviews, in social media. It's looking atMPs, it's looking at windlass data and how sales reps are saying they'relosing deals and also how customers are saying why they're churning. So that feedbackcollection is critical. And then it's the an analysis of okay, what arethe themes coming out of that feedback data? So this is really where our strengths, what are we doing really well? Where our weaknesses? What do weneed to maybe improve? Looking at how feedback they're giving could be impactingyour performance. So turne. If your customer saying we left because of this, obviously that could have a higher impact than someone who is giving you moreconstructive criticism. But it might not be actually driving your business in a certaindirection. And then once you understand that, of course the pinnacle is action andthat is the hardest to get to. I someone told me the other daythat there was a call tricks report that showed that only five percent ofcompanies are in the action phase. Is Actually I think one of our ourcompanies we work with is plural site and they have an amazing voice of thecustomer program that's really advanced. To give in their size, but he letme know about that five percent stad and a five percent on the action phase, and that's actually doing something about those weaknesses and opportunities that you say.And that takes us back to where you started with the question and I it'sso helped by just pro tip for anyone doing any work of any kind whenyou are in a definitional situation, defining something in part by what it's notas very, very helpful. And so that that five percent number reminds mewe restarted with it. It's not just the survey. Check the box,congratulations were done. I feel like I pulled some of this forward by askingthat question right after customer experience. But...

...for folks who aren't familiar. Tellus a little bit about loop voc like who's your ideal customer and what areyou solving for them? Yeah, so louc is a voice of the customerand Voice of the market platforms. So we work with BBSASS companies that arein start up to midsize business range. Usually are our customers have between twohundred and five thousand employees, and we really help with really providing technology tomake that voice of the customer process more streamlined. So we integrate into channelswhere a lot of times feedbacks are reading stored, like sales force for notesfrom sales conversations or customer success conversations, survey tools for the feedback that's comingfrom a lot of these customer experienced surveys like net promoter score or even seesad or c es, and then we also crawl the web for places wherecustomers are giving feedback on the Internet, like online reviews or social media,and we use natural language processing, which is a form of machine learning,to scan through all of that text and identify the key themes that are comingout of it so you can understand the action that you should take. So, for example, you know a customer could see that over a certain periodof time there'd been more complaints about how long it took to get an answerfrom support, and then they'd be able to actually shift their support strategy tobetter meet those needs. And that example is actually an example of what areour customers that they had was able to launch chat support just based on understandinghow their customer needs had changed, even though their average response time was stayingthe same. So they were hitting the quantitative goal, but the qualitative datathat comes out of feedback can help you understand when your own goals might beoff based on what customers need. Really good. I think we're going toget probably deeper into several of the things that you drove by there, butbefore we do you've already defined voice of customer, which is the voc partof loop BOC. I feel like is there something about the customer feedback loopand listening and analyzing and acting. This is that part of the loop inthe company's name, and how do you arrive at it? Just kind offor fun? Yeah, loop is the when you were at, when youachieve the pinnacle of closing the loop, shifting your company strategies. That iskind of closing the loop. So Loup is kind of a play on thefact that you know, once you listen to customers, it's important that you'reactually acting on that feedback and then continuing to listen to them again, becauseWest strategy is only going to stay relevant for so long. I think it'sreally interesting, since I've launched Loepre's actually two years ago last week, thatI radulation. I think a lot of times companies will think about the thelittle loop. What I've got the little loop, which is following up withan individual customer to say we resolve this problem or making sure that they're satisfied. But a lot of times we don't close the bigger loop, which isactually changing company strategy. So saying, okay, we are actually going toact on this information by changing our pricing or changing our product roadmap or shiftingto a new support model. And then obviously the loop has to be closedon a group better scale because you're actually impacting a huge signal of your customers. The loop and loop VOC is is all about the action and honestly Ican't even remember it. You're just like I think I just like woke upand was like loop and it just made some muselse. I love it.And in the really cool nuance you've added here is that big loop piece.I because, you know, I'm just thinking about the work that we dohere, a bombomb it. Certainly we're pretty aggressive about closing the little loops, especially extreme positive and extreme negative, but but that big loop is somethingthat is, you know, becomes operational and it transcends any of that andit gets ahead of so many like you...

...have to. I would assume thatif you start to do this very, very well, that there's fewer smallloops opened because you're addressing the bigger loop. That's actually a point. Yes,one hundred percent. Now I know a little bit about your founding story, but I would love to hear it, because you are like so many ofthe guests on the show where you are solving a problem that you hadyourself in a previous role. And so the way you defined voice of customerand introduced who loop, theoc is, I think gets at it. Butlet's get one layer deeper, like where were you, what were you upagainst and how did this opportunity to bring everything together emerge for you enough sothat, while you're in this entrepreneurship program at UNC Chapel Hill. You sayI'm going to go do this just I'll start off just in general. Ithink a lot of entrepreneurs to have that brain where they have constantly have ideas. And so I talked to many entrepreneurs that have like an idea book whereyou know they have companies that can start and I've talked to all so peoplethat are on that fence of wanting to be an entrepreneur but being too afraidto make the jump. which is the hardest part is saying, okay,I'm going to give up my nice corporate salary and just go on in withthis thing that probably won't work like based on statistics. But with Loup,the best thing to describe it is it just was. It haunted me.The problem haunted me. I could not shake it, I could wouldn't leave. It haunted me for seven years. So when I started at Black Bawd, I was in sales, I was a BEDR and I was talking tocustomers every day. See know, making sixty dollars a day. I'd geton the phone with twenty of them. One would become a lead. Eventhen it was really interesting to me there's so much process for that one leadthat I would get what they needed, how we could help them, whatthey were going through. There was no process for those nineteen calls that Italked to but didn't want to do business with us, and they were tellingme things like competitors are pricing you out of market. This company over hereis developing a feature that better serves my market needs. You know, here'swhere I'm I've heard bad things about you and it was really, you know, kind of perplexing to me. So I became very interested in how decisionswere made out of company. How did a company decide when they should shiptheir strategy? I found that marketing was a big place where those kind ofdecisions were being made, and so I wanted to go to marketing because thiswas interesting me. And when I went into marketing, I found that theway the decisions were being made, which is very common for a lot ofcompanies, especially one that was black blood size, was doing one or twosurveys a year, spending a lot of money, waiting six months for thoseresults to be analyzed and then saying, okay, here's what we're going todo for the year, here's what we need to build the product for thissegment, because I we need to change positioning. We might want to dosome repricing. Let's kick off our annual plan. Hey, maybe you'll leaveme tied to a three year plan. It just was not leveraging any ofthose insights that we were getting on the front line every day, and Ithink that's another important part of VOC is like your frontline people, you haveto empower and trust that they are good source of spent out. But Igot the opportunity to actually change some of that when the company was moving frombeing an on Prim legacy software company to be assass company, because suddenly waslike, okay, well, now there's something called subscription revenue and something calledretention. Yeah, we're going to need to be a little more agile andhow we're delivering value. And it's very common to think about that part ofproduct perspective because you have agile road maps and no longer is it a waterfallonce a year approached rolling out features. It's, you know, every dayeven. But people weren't thinking about that...

...from a positioning and a go tomarket perspective or even a some experience perspective, and so I got to kind ofcreate a process where once a week we would meet with executive leadership andI would present the key themes that were coming out of feedback from customers prospectsin the market. What that looked like on the back end was every TuesdayI would meet with representation from sales, customers, success, legal, finance, marketing, product, any function you know, of the customer experience,and we would talk about what are the key things we're hearing from customers andprospects in terms of what's going well, what's not going well, how isthat tied to revenue and what do we want to bring up as in termsof actions that need to be taken to hit our numbers? We present thatto the sea sweet every Thursday. Every Thursday decisions were made. Every Thursdaywe would say, okay, you know, head of our Ideo, what arewe doing to solve this in Canada? Okay, we're going to pivot.And this was a company that was known like we're thirty years old.We were known for being a dinosaur like, not in Concident, but because theseas week actually was connected to quantifiable trends of here's what we need todo to hit our numbers based on what customers need. We could move somuch faster and it was really also inspiring to the frontline employees to because theywere being listened to and then they were to close more deals or retain morecustomers and it was really powerful. And I think what really it stood outto me was just how changed the culture of the company just to be sopositive. And obviously our customers during that time like and if you look atblack bloodstock parties during that time, I was like two thousand and fourteen whenwe moved to the cloud and we're having these meetings like it is very inline with we were. You could tell we're meeting their needs. You know, obviously that process I described as a lot of work, reading through thousandsof pieces of text sales force notes, cerum, that it was hard tomaintain and expensive to maintain, and the only options that were out there arethese big companies like qual tricks, which are great for enterprise companies, buta lot of times, you know, smaller farmanies camp for that. Andso again I come back to like there's this problem, and I just keptthinking about if there was some sort of way for there to be this repositorywhere technology could automate that, and I even like started talking about I waslike, oh, we need like a loot, we need loop, andthere was like, Oh yeah, we need loop. And then when Iwas at UNC I was taking a trip to Denmark and I was visiting anaccelerator and this engineer came up, penny, couldn't speak barely any English actually,because he was from Germany. He was presenting natural language processing and itwas bucketing together these like words that weren't the same word, but it wasbasically contextualizing themes coming out of text and I thought this is the future,this is Luke, this is Luke, and so I was immediately googling everythingI could about naturally as processing, deep learning. Ai. Very quickly knewI would never know enough, so I came back hired of you data scientistson the side to run models on textual data to see if it could evenbe close. After about a year I was like, okay, this coldwork and then went all in. Right, that was a really long but soundsfascinating to me. It's so wonderful and it reaffirms to me something thatI believe is very, very true, and I think we you just goto like just generically speaking, ai write like ai is not useful unless youhave very large data set and humans that truly understand the problem. And I'vehad like their hands in it and they've worked through it and it's a struggleand all the stuff like you went. You did so much of the thein in the other folks you're working with so much of the heavy human liftto truly understand it so that you're not...

...just building or throwing software solutions andhardware solutions at a problem, but instead you're truly solving it from from adeep understanding. It's a fantastic story. Really really enjoyed it and and it'sobviously a lot more detail that I had before from a let's now let's justbring it back to the listener here. So maybe there is someone doing asimilar role as you were, a black bought, where someone's running around andcollecting things and sharing things and telling things and organizing information. Run that downfor folks like what are some of the the primary like when you let's say, let's say loop on boards a new customer, what are the what arethe five to ten most court? I'm making that number up how many usefuldata sources does your average new customer have and what are some of those channelsor sources? You've already mentioned a couple, but let's let's kind of boil thosedown really in one spot. This is important because a lot of timescompanies will get really focused on having a perfect data set that is weighted andremoves all bias and are thinking about it from a very market research standpoint.And absolutely you need to make sure that you can trust the data. Thatis critical, but at the same time, this kind of movement towards agility,and especially in the ASS world, agility over action over perfection, isreally the Manstra that we take with our customers, and that what I've seeneven those companies that aren't our customers and are the most forward thinking in theirBARC are doing. And so when you think about the data sets you wantto start with, I usually like to start with mbs, because most babesasscompanies are doing that already. It's a great way to also add some quantificationbeyond just frequency, because you have a score and you can tie that withsentiment analysis to say, okay, what is the impact on our MPs scoreif we were to make a change. The second is online reviews, whichis often controversial when I'm talking to customers at first because I think online reviewsare oftentimes spot of outside of marketing. Is Marketing Fluff. But if Iforce someone to actually read a review, they're like, Oh wow, thisperson's like giving US criticism. Like yeah, they're giving like they have to.It's part of the question, and so it's not just a yelp review, like a review that comes from I'd say gtwo crowd cap, Tera,trust radius and trust pilot are the most use that I've seen in the BBSa space. There's really really valuable data that's coming out of that and itgives you a data point from a different stage of your customer lifestycle. Theother I'd say, like this is would be like a well rounded three andps online reviews and then sales force notes, either coming from deals that are oneand lost, that are coming from customer successing why a customer left.And I think this is important because it forces the the program from the beginningto incorporate not just direct from the customer feedback, but also it says,I'm trusting this speedback coming from my front line teams because they are the connectionto the customer and we can get more feedback from their interactions and we canbombarding every single customer to give us feedback all the time. So so thoseare the that's the three he ones that start our with really good how doyou intersect or do you intersect that data with things like product usage data?However, the the companies segmenting their customer base, perhaps lifetime value, etcetera. You know you already reference like, let's take this information and not justsolve problems but also project impacts of things. So I assume that you're intersecting thiswith different customer types, lifetime value, etc. What's the bridge there?One hundred percent. Segmentation is huge...

...and that's actually been our primary focusfor this year has been continuing to evolve that functionality so that I just actuallyposted about needs based segmentation, going in to two thousand and twenty one andreally looking at all of that kind of firmographic or demographic of your BBC Dataabout your company and the segments you're building out, but also segmenting on customersthat might not look alike but they have the same needs and so you couldposition in them in the same way. But a lot of that is alreadypulled into loop because we integrate with things like Sans Force, which will oftenhold a lot of that data. Also like places like segment that are storinga lot of the segmentation data. The thing that we were thinking more andmore about out and as we don't have a great, perfect answer for yet, but I imagine it's probably an integration of some type is really bridging theuse of product us the data, especially for product like growth companies, andthe qualitative data. And you see a lot of companies like Pendo, forexample, they have an MPs in their APP and so you can see theiranalysis of the text with all the other metrics. But getting beyond is thatMPs survey and then also looking at the quantitative that's coming from, you know, product usage. A lot of times companies are kind of matching that upor putting it together in like a tableau. But there's not a perfect answer forthat one yet. I think that's that's the future. Yeah, good. What's it's comforting for me to hear is we try to like make allof our stuff connect and tell better stories to help people more effective. Thatthat's still not fully in a lot of the loops that a lot of customersare challenge with and working on. Where does this live? A lot oforganizations? I can see this being an initiative out of CS. I candefinitely see it coming out of marketing and your story, of course, ismarketing, and product marketing in particular, with a little bit of marketing APPsflavor to it. But who's having most of the conversations as potential customers withloop and or in an onboarding process? Like who's at the table? Itfeels like this transcends every team. That's the ballenge that you're solving. Isthis is bigger than anyone team. So it has never been solved effectively before. Like, who are people at the table? Like who's the primary driver? What does this look like inside an organization? Yeah, it's a greatquestion. This has been the key, like the the key challenge and opportunity, I will say, of our journey to finding product market fit as astartup. Obviously, so I think I mentioned yeah, I have a productmarketing background and I wore that hat at black blood because there isn't the hatof Voice of the customer manager, whatever you want to call it because,being a company that was just moving to Sass like we've didn't have a customerexperience team at the time, and so we're just kind of pulling people off. I think product marketing is a great role to kind of take charge onan effort like this, because they do already sit between so many functions.But that said, when you talk about yourself being a voice of the customerplatform, everyone is immediately going to think customer success. And when we arefirst talking a customer like launching in the market, customer success or were whocame to us, and I've learned a lot about, you know, customersuccess leadership over the past two years. The challenges that customer success is notcustomer experience and a lot of times it's thought of that way. But wetalked about big loops and little loops. Customer six says has a little loopthat they are humble to solve, and so that is their party number one. There will lose their job if they don't solve that and so a lotof times they closing that bigger loop comes second, and so a tool likeloop is almost a nice to have for them, because we're not help,we're not gainsite we're not helping them,...

...you know, create a customer healthscore and help them solve that. Home with that customer at that time.We're homing them. Say Hey, take this to the CEO and show himthat you are going to lose twenty percent of this segment of customers if youdon't shift your pricing strategy to be more in lined with what they're needing.And I found that there's really not a standard for who owns that in acompany. But the best approach is having, to your point, the key playerscome together, which is marketing, product and customer success. Those tome, if you don't have a customer experience team, those are the usersthat are in loop. They're like all, almost every single one of our customers. Those three functions are represented and I think that's what is represented bya strong DAC program love it and I'm sure it winds up, you know, you get everyone at the table. I'm sure when she raises her handor he raises his hand in different companies that you wind up probably with differentrules leading an implementation like this. Are you seeing? Have you? Youmean, I guess, even in the two years or in your career ingeneral, are we're where do you think we are in terms of having operationalizedCX, with CX teams and CX titles, especially, you know it where you'respending a lot of your time now, which is be tob SASS. Isit ten percent of the conversations? This is the representative, is ats at twenty two, is at seventy five. You have any thoughts onthat or observations? I was very surprised with how how far we have togo as an industry with CX, because I think if you were just anoutsider looking at like your linkedin feed, you'd be like wow, all thesecutting edge CX teams, like this is amazing. Everyone so far along,but like when you actually get in and talk to most companies like they're figuringit out. They're figuring out things like where should this live? They arethey've launched a CX team, but they've found mistakes with maybe putting it inthe wrong place or making it too broad or not giving the role the empowermentthat they need to actually drive decisions. You know, I've read some articlesthat make a lot of sense to me, which is like the CEO should bethe head of CX, but then if the CEO is a products drivenperson, they're not going to be giving that x the importance that it needs. And so, you know, that was another key challenge with starting loopwas I went into it thinking I was working at at a very legacy company, like surely everyone else in the industry was already doing this. We werejust going to make it faster and more horriable. But really it's a newit's a new attory and it's it's to your point earlier. It involves somuch collaboration, like it involves really we're going together or on a common goal, and that is why CEO involvement really there's no way around that in thebeginning. Like, if you don't want to see you that's making this apriority. I just don't think it can work. I'm curious your thoughts onit. Yeah, it's interesting. I see a lot of CX coming outof CS if it's being like acted on or operationalized. Anyway. I'm certainlyseeing more CX titles, but those titles mean the same variation. I meansome of them are legit, like you go solve this, tell us whatyou need. We need to do this better. Get everybody in a roomand do it regularly enough so that we can make some kind of an operationalizedsense of progress here. But then also I see just cx being slapped onwhat is a CS roll just straight up is definitely post sale. It's veryclearly traditionally cs by definition and honestly, one of the one of the waysthat I got buy in and their variety of reasons that that my team supportsme having conversations like these and publishing them and spending time doing it, whichis an absolute joy and privilege, is that these are, you know,a lot of the questions I ask here in our conversation Lauren, but alsothe you know hundred and whatever that came...

...before it. I'm asking questions onbehalf of our own organization because, you know, we have a lot ofthe same challenges as we've already talked around, which is we have a lot ofdifferent sources of data. The product team is looking at Tableau reports thatthey've put together with product usage data, but it doesn't totally intersect with whatthe finance team is saying in terms of trends and segmentation, in terms ofconversion rates, lifetime value, etc. Various conversion rates mind you. Andthen you know we do a pretty good jobs and executive leadership team, ofbringing in cus team members into our weekly meetings, bringing sales people into ourweekly meetings, deals one, deals lost, themes that are happening out there,and so we're good at doing a lot of it. But you know, to the challenge you set out to solve with loop, it doesn't alllive in one place and the stories are a bit disparate and sometimes they canflict with each other. I'm thinking of one segment in particular. One ofthe things I look at and I'll give it back to you for whatever observationsyou have about what I shared. You know, a particular customer segment ofours. I like to look at our customers in terms of how many videosthey're sending. If you send a thousand videos or three thousand videos or fivethousand videos, you've clearly identified a lot of use cases and you're using theproduct and in the spirit in which it was intended, which is to replacesome of what would otherwise be typed out emails or typed out linkedin messages orwhatever. Right, it's cool if you if you're for your customer and yousend one video a month to all of your customers. But frankly, youcould do that with mail chimp and Youtube or, you know, Whistia andconstant contact or whatever like we that's you could do that with us, butthat's not what we're trying to do. So I'm looking for customers using theproduct in really interesting ways and then getting to know them and why did yousend your two thousand seven hundred and eighty four video and understanding them and whattheir business looks like, etcetera, and so doing that over years I've prettyclear picture. So I'm looking at this particular segment and they're dramatically overrepresented interms of accounts that have sent five thousand videos or more. It's like forx their representation in the customer population overall. But our CFO is looking at thatsame segment from his seat and goes like this segment is not very goodfor us, and I'm looking at this segment, gooring this segments amazing,and so it's like there's a truth in between their somewhere. Men really thatyou can start to pursue that as a question. But we all see thecustomer a little bit differently. A salesperson definitely sees a prospect differently than anonboarding manager sees a new customer. They just see that person differently period,and so I think we all see the customer differently. So this organizing itand allowing everyone to operate a little bit more from the same story lines andthemes and trends and things that are changing is just so useful, so useful, and that is such a great example that you just gave of silos.Unfortunately, but even if you were working together, which it seems like youwere, because you even Gott the data, to to know that, you knowhe was looking a different way is like reframing it as all of thisdata can tell us a story. And I don't know, I've been thinkinga lot about data, not just because you know, loops a data company, but also just our current world is. It's it's very easy to get pulledinto what data says from certain reports, but data can be read anyway thatyou want it to right. It's biased without analyzed and even with machinelearning, machines learn from humans. So the collaboration here comes in again iscan we get all the right people in the room to have a discussion?I'm sure the CFO you know, I was just doing a segmentation exercise myselfwhere we found a similar problem. Our highest customers with the highest adoption thatwe're hitting, like the key value metrics that we set up, which wouldbe similar to them out of video set. We're also had our highest a positioncosts. They just did. And so what we ended up doing waswhat is the break even point where we actually are costs of acquisition, becomesworth getting those customers that are adopting us...

...today? Is it increasing how muchthey're paying us because they're seeing a lot of value and so then they actuallybecome a really valuable customern our CFOs happy, or is it trying to take outsome of the cost from how much it takes to require them by providingvalue in a new channel and not relying on calling all of them? Ithink it's hard to get every decision and maker at a company in a room, but that's where like embedding it in part of like your weekly or monthlyleadership meetings. The Voice of the customer and cushional experience is so critical.Just even just knowing other points of view and like what other functions are lookingat. So your cofounder, how many other cofounders. I've two other cofounders. We have faery, is our technical cofounder and our CCEO, and thenrob is our CFO operations finance. A lot of people were a lot ofhats, of course, and so I guess what I was teaming up thereis this. Did you have a shared philosophy about the experience you wanted tocreate and deliver for your customers on the way into this we did. Allof us have experienced good and bad culture for this type of work, andI think it's almost equally as important to experience the bad because you can seehow much of an impact that has on the potential of a company. Soall of us have shared values, one of them being democratization of data.So unlimited is very important for us for users to not be our value pricingmetric, ie what we charge on, because we want cross functional collaboration tobe part of our you know, on boarding from day one, like asmany people in, you're looking at the same thing as possible. Just sothat's an example that we all kind of share that value. So good.That's just a like a double back on this place where we were, Idon't know, twenty five minutes ago for fifteen. Experiencing bad culture is likehelping define something by what it isn't. I'm not sure exactly we want todo, but we don't want to do that. Yes, really, reallygood. Hey, if you are listening to this and you're enjoying this conversation, I've got a couple more that I think you'll enjoy. Episode Eighty onewith Aaron Wike, the CEO of gather up, which is they help teamscollect customer feedback. So we called that one for truths, to make customerexperience the backbone of Your Business. And episode seventy two with Shinney Benz or, who is head of marketing, media and growth at crunch base. Shealso has a product marketing background, as you do, Lauren, and wecalled that one better marketing through product sales and customer conversations. We talked alot about how to get these conversations going internally so that everyone can get onthe same page, something that you're tackling in a really unique and powerful way. I'm really excited about it and I appreciate you spending time with us onthe customer experience podcast. Before I let you go, Lauren, I wouldlove to give you two opportunities. The first is to think or mention someonewho's had a positive impact on your life or your career, and the otheris a shoutout or not, or a mention of a brand or a companythat you really appreciate for the experience they did deliver for you as a customer. Shout out would go to Mary pats analogy. She is the chief revenueofficer at Call Rail, which is a startup in Atlanta that focuses on calltranscription and intelligence. She has been a mentor to me my entire career.I starting from a Bedr kind of inspired me to go to marketing and hasbeen with me as I started this company. Also put the responsibility on me tobe the voice of the customer manager in addition to my product marketing job, and I was very upset with her at the time because it seemed likea lot of work, but now I'm extremely grateful, but just a greatexample woman really empowering and lifting up other women around her. So shout outto Mary Pat and yeah, my recent...

...customer experience and I want to givea bet to be one because I think that's really important interesting just for myworld and yours is autopilot. So autopilot. I'm always delighted by them. Andwhat's most interesting is I have no customer success manager there. I'm payingtheir lowest tier, their very product, like group company, but they haveset the expectations and their sales and marketing from the very beginning to be selfservice, lightweight, and when I need support it always is above and beyondmy expectations. So autopilot. Love that tool for its product, but alsogreats pustomer experience. Averre all really good. I mean it just begs I couldhave gone down laurened, and it was all I could do not toask these follow cush I could have gone down at least six or eight otherconversations with you, is including going deeper on expectation management. But we willcall this a conversation. And if folks want to follow up on it,where would you send people to connect with you or with loop voc or anywhereelse you might want to send? People who enjoyed this, feel free tojust email me directly lauren at loupoccom. LOUPYS ACOM is our website and it'sreally easy to contact us there as well, but feel free to reach out directlysuper that's awesome. Thanks so much. I enjoyed it and I appreciate you. Appreciate you. Thanks for having me then. Clear Communication, humanconnection, higher conversion. These are just some of the benefits of adding videoto the messages you're sending every day. It's easy to do with just alittle guidance, so pick up the official book rehumanize Your Business. How personalvideos accelerate sales and improve customer experience. Learn more in order today at BombombcomBook. That's bomb bombcom book. Thanks for listening to the customer experience podcast. Remember, the single most important thing you can do today is to createand deliver a better experience for your customers. Continue Learning the latest strategies and tacticsby subscribing right now in your favorite podcast player, or visit Bombombcom podcast.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (180)