The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode 135 · 4 months ago

135. Creating Conversational Relationships With Thousands of Customers w/ Ali Biggs

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The best conversation that you can have with a customer is one in which they don’t walk away without answers. That might sound obvious, but the path to arriving there requires you to know exactly how to balance bot and human — and how to transition seamlessly between them.

In this episode, I interview Ali Biggs, Senior Director of Product Marketing at Intercom, about marketing for a conversational relationship platform (CRP).

Ali also talked with me about:

- The relationship between EX and CX

- The conviction that relationships with customers are paramount

- Utilizing bots to converse at volume

- Where to position product marketing for greatest effect

Check out these resources we mentioned during the podcast:

- Lauren Vaccarello

- Nybll

Subscribe, listen, and rate/review the Customer Experience Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play or Google Podcasts, and find more episodes on our blog. Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for The Customer Experience Podcast in your favorite podcast player.

Ultimately, we just keep kept comingback to this central conviction that building relationships with yourcustomers is the most important thing. The single most important thing you cando today is to create and deliver a better experience for your customers,learn how sales marketing and customer success experts create internalalignment, achieved desired outcomes and exceed customer expectations in apersonal and human way. This is the customer experience podcast. Here'syour host, even bute conversations connect people. Theyengage people there how we build relationships, especially when they're,honest, authentic and reciprocal today. We're talking about conversationalrelationships in a business context will also be talking a little product.Marketing to today's guests been a couple years with a marketing agencythat humanizes brands and connects them to people. She spent a half dozen yearsin marketing leadership roles at Ad Roll now next roll a marketing and datatechnology company. Today she serves a senior director of product marketing atIntercom, a conversational relationship platform, the Business Messenger, yourcustomers will love ally, bigs. Welcome to the customer experience podcast!Thank you, Ethan! I'm really excited to be here, and that was a pretty solidintro. I wrote one myself, but I touched on all the t: The top notes,good anything. I missed there, no, not really, unless you were going to diveinto my personal interest, which would have been strange given. This is thefirst time we're meeting so you what's so funny, I'm actually kind of going togo there so early on in where this is going to be, I think, episode, one andthirty, seven or somewhere in that range and early on it became obvious.The relationship between employee experience and customer experience andthere's something I noticed in preparing for this interview that Ijust think is super awesome and I think it speaks to the employee experienceside in so I love your take on it. It's your inter comic, so yeah prefer peoplewho are listening and not watching you...

...can go see this at bombace drop it intothe blog post. For this episode it's essentially like a trading card with anillustration of you, you know you're titled. It's got some of your personalinterest there. So, like kind of like two layer question here, what is theInter comic like? How long has the team been doing it? What is its purpose orfunction, and then what on that card, whether it's having the neatestrefrigerator being a cat lover or wearing a B B beard? What's maybe oneof your favorite details on your inter comic yeah, so Inter Comics, as far asI understand have been around for as long as Inter com has and essentially what they are, is everyyear on, your introversh, your team and your manager helped to put together abrief that turns into this comic this caricature of yourself and includesthings like a quote: Specific Outfit, etc, etc. In years past, they were abit more free form. Each one was really really unique, and with that you can,you know you lead to the output at like that, took a lot of resources in orderto produce so about a year ago. Actually they transitioned to thisinter card approach, which is slightly more templated, but we've all beendelighted to see that it still leaves a lot of room for creativity and so asthe recipient of the Inter comic every year, you're completely in the darkuntil the day that it shared in the moment it shared with the whole companyas to like what impression he left with the people around you, and so I just Ihad hit my one year introversh in November, and I was pretty delighted tosee you know the elements of my personal brand that had come to life inthe first year and yeah. You touched on some of them, so my dog and my cat bothmade it. My obsessively neat fridge that I was, quite frankly just theresult of not a lot to do during early coid days, and then I actually the bebeard. One is definitely the strangest...

...there's just reference to that. Myhusband's family runs a honey business and so a few years ago, to what I wasstill like, trying to get in with the family, I agreed to wear a babe yard atthe West, Virginia State Honey Festival, because his dad was doing one too andif you believe it, I didn't get stung a single time, although it did requiretwo beers in advance to make sure I was calm enough to actually be able to doit, but so, anyway, those are some of the kind of fun things that came tolife. In my inner comic and yeah they're, a pretty beloved element ofour culture, yeah, that's a nothing says: love like putting on a b beardagain right and do against your natural instincts. I love it. I really like soso. They're shared internally and people talk about them and you probablylearn about your team members through them and all of that exactly back whenwe were in the physical space, they were on rotation on monitors throughoutall of the offices. They were also printed out and on a big wall in eachof the offices as well. So now it's more obviously digital distribution. Weutilize face book workplace, so it's typically shared there and then crossposted in slack and then, of course, we celebrate them like within ourindividual team meetings as well. Within the Marketing Org. We have a bitof a tradition where, what or once a month all hands they'll flash it andyou have to say your three favorite things about it, similar to what youjust did, and so it's just a really cool way to to actually get to know,folks that you probably don't interact with that often day to day you get tosee what's on their inner comic and it can be sort of like a look into theirsoul in a way I love it. I did I just just little glimpse into the IntercomCulture that you've already offered just so attract. I could. I couldactually hijack this whole episode and go down that road, but we'll we'll getinto conversational relationships instead, but we'll start where wealways start alley, which is customer experience when I say that what does itmean to you, yeah t s to me. It encompasses a lot ofthings, but I think about just the...

...specific interactions between a companyand a customer or a consumer, and so all of those touch points along the wayfrom when you're first hearing about them to you know, ideally when you're apaying customer that they want to retain it's all of those moments anddifferent formats, different channels that you're actually interacting andthat experience is sort of an aggregate of all of those touch points. Andideally it's positive often times it is. But we all know that there's there's adark side as well yeah do you have any feelings about whether it should be arole or a function or a team or whether it should just be this kind of holistic,attitudinal. Philosophical thing that is kind of just baked into the companyin the way operates. Yeah. I feel pretty strongly that it should be thelatter. It just needs to be part of your shared goal across the entire orge.It is to create a positive customer experience. If you had one team, Ithink there's just the potential that a lot of those efforts end up living in asilo, and you kind of you know what do I say like you're whispering into thewind in a way, but when it becomes central to the marketing team, the randteam, the sales team, the support team, you know the solutions team. All ofthose teams. Central remit is to create this positive experience and you're,embracing the fact that you're starting a conversation with these customersreally early on, and you want to keep that conversation going over time. Ithink that when everyone embraces that, it's going to result in the bestexperience for your customers and then ultimately has payoffs for yourbusiness as well, really good for people who aren't familiar tell us alittle bit about intercom like who's your ideal customer. What problem doyou solve for them? Yeah great question? So Intercom? Is We call ourselves aconversational relationship platform and we exist to help better connect,customers or companies to their...

...customers? And we are our idealcustomer. Our traditional customer has been sort of software companies.Typically, we skewed into be to be, but one trend that we've actually seen inthe last year, largely due to Covin and shifts due to the pandemic, because weactually have more more B to b companies who are coming to us to youknow, take a messenger first approach to how they support their customers,and so our IP has expanded over the last year as a result. But we have apresence in a number of different regions and tea, a pack and in the USas well, but in Latium as well, and so our IP is is like decently bride. Butwe have also in the last year, really found also due to shift due to thepandemic, that there is a greater need for stronger support tools in this timedue to a number of different reasons. So I think we may or may not touch ontoday, and so ultimately, we've really been leaning into that space to makesure that we're actually answering the call of our support customers and havewhat they need in order to be efficient and provide positive experiences fortheir customers. Awesome happy to go a little bit into tools a little bit atleast conversational relationships like what does that mean? In this context Imean- I think you know the a simple way to think about. It is chat. An this iskind of where the tool piece comes in where you're you know communicatingback and forth directly with customers through a website or an APP, but it'smore than that a little color on conversational relationships yeah. Sowe call ourselves a conversational relationship, platform or C RP, whichis a bit of a mouthful and if we I'm being really honest, it took us like along time to land. On that term, we explored customer Experience PlatformCustomer Messaging Platform. There were probably about twenty more that werifle through and really liked, and then you know had struck down andultimately, we just keep kept coming...

...back to this central conviction thatbuilding relationships with your customers is the most important thing.So timely messaging, a great experience, they're really important as well whenthose, but those are specific ways to build a relationship, they're, not theend goal, and so we believe that the best way to build that relationship isby being constantly in conversation with your customers. So so that's sortof the the basis of like the name or the term conversational relationshipsand, more specifically, a conversational relationship platform,allows businesses to build those relationships through Messenger basedexperiences, at least primarily everything from when a prospect. Firstlands on your website for the first time to when they're, paying customerand a question arises, and they need your teams, your support, Tamsel. Sogetting into the element of your question around the tools. We dobelieve that, in order to deliver on that claim that we filled thesestronger relationships through these messenger based experiences, that theplatform also has to do more than just live chat. That alone is not enough todeliver around that. Ultimately, there needs to be a powerful underlying datalayer. There needs to be tools and automation that ultimately improvedteammate efficiency over time, and we also want to enable teams to manageinteractions from channels outside of the Messenger as well right. So we knowthat we acknowledge that things like email and smas and beyond have a placein a sort of the customer experience, and we think that you shouldn't have tomanage a whole bunch of different desperate tools. Side by side. Youshould be able to do that all in one central platforms, that's awesome, somy understanding now is that it's obviously there's a messenger layerthat is unique to the platform and it's probably installed in different places,but that you can also ingest communication from other channels buton. Let's say the the customer care associates screen. It's all kind of inone dashboard, nice and tidy, probably...

...with the history there. I really likewhat you offered to about the data layer. Let's go into that for just aminute. My impression is that, just as a customer, not even someone who hostconversations like these, but just as a customer, I feel like too manycompanies are releasing kind of chat bots without having done the hard workof the live chat to figure out who's talking to us in this channel. What arethey asking about? What are they asking about? Sixty percent of the time? Whatare they asking about six percent of the time what responses tend to produce?You know the most satisfied people and get people to where they need to go thequickest, etcetera talk about this combination of the data layer beingable to take what I think is the NECESSA add of your own opinions, asyou wish, that takes the necessary live human, hard work, unscalableconversations they all have to happen kind of in real time. You turn thatinto data at some layer and help that be kind of a self served component orthat's where the automation starts yeah. So the data layers can be it'simportant from from visit one on your website right. So there are tools thatyou can utilize really like absent, integrations that you can utilize sothat you know a decent amount about a website visitor the moment that theyshow up right in terms of, and sometimes it's pretty broad in terms oflike company size, but sometimes you can actually kind of reverse engineer,like your target account list, for example, and I bring that up just tosay that, like we no longer have to take this like kind of spray and prayapproach right or one term that we talk about quite a bit is like the floodgates right, and that applies both to kind of what we call conversationalmarketing, which is, when you're trying to convert more traffic on your website,but it this definitely applies on the support side as well. Right. A lot ofteams are pretty scared to just like turn live chat on to all of theircustomers and rightfully so like that would be in some cases. You know if youtens of thousands of customers- and you...

...don't have some of those self servetools that you've touched on set up. It could be disastrous for inbound volumeright. So there's an element of just utilizing all of the data that you haveat your disposal to ensure that targeting of specific messages,specific thought experiences specific, like Messenger modes, for example- areall being utilized as real bastly as possible. So you should never be justopening those flood gates and like expecting your support team or evenyour sales team to to manage that on their own, because, quite frankly, thebots which you touched on for a second there- have advanced in some prettyincredible ways in recent years and I'll touch on the specifics of like twoways that you could utilize bots to kind of address that that volume. Thefirst is in what you sort of alluded to there around like. If you generallyhave an idea of the types of questions that are being asked, and youunderstand what that typical path is, you can understand what pieces ofcontent or most relevant based on where that individual, that company is andtheir sale psychotest, you can create, like kind of pre, set paths that youknow sort of spider out. In terms of you know they answer this to thisquestion and you send them here if they answer this, this question you sendthem here and this old o that custom bought path that you can produce, andthis can be incredibly effective, especially if you're trying to qualifythat individual. If you actually have a bit of a gap in the data that you knowabout them, you can use sort of that to collect more insight to make sure thatyou're then sending them to the right individuals with the right teaminternally. But then there's this concept of more of a dynamic likeautomation, based bots and ours, is called Resolution Bot, and in that case,what you're doing is it it's much more like free form, based on the question?That's being asked for the topic that's being raised, and so things like theperson can start typing and it can have type of head suggestions of you knowyou may be looking for this, for example like that can be reallypowerful. We all love that aspect of Google, except for when it likedefaults to something very strange, and...

...you like no, but we like to think thatdoesn't happen with our bobs. But in that case it also has the ability toreally utilize or to truly deliver like a self serve experience by, for example,tapping into your existing help center documentation that already exists andlike dynamically, serving that up, based on the intent that they displayedor the topics that they've entered into the chat in that or into the you knowthe Messenger Window, and that can be incredibly powerful because a lot oftimes the questions that customers have don't need to be answered by a livehuman. They can absolutely I mean most of my questions can be answered by asimple Google search, and so the same applies often times to kind of yourapproach to support. You don't have to ensure that you're sending every singleperson to a live human being. There is definitely a time in a place for that,but you can do your team a heck of a lot of favors by utilizing some ofthese pating options, the more dynamic automation options to just ensure thatfolks are getting answers to their questions as quickly as possible andthen you're saving your people for only the most complex or maybe it's throughtips and they're you're able to tag who those folks are and as soon as theyshow up in your product and send a message they're automatically in thehands of you know your top ter support raps instead of having to wade throughthe self sort of experience. So it's all to say that it's pretty advanced atthis point yeah the into your point, not every like. I don't have theexpectation or the need to talk to a human, not only gin, a kind o bout getme where I need to go, but in a lot of cases that's would be my preference.Maybe, as a customer talk really quickly, we don't have to stay on itvery long, but talk about that off. Ramp like where are the outs like whenyour customers are setting up like what are the offer ams to say? Okay, we'vegot I'm thinking in my mind and like a picturing like a rage, click orsomething like what is the off ramp to divert a conversation from okay. Thisis obviously not productive for you or...

...your confused, your frustrated. Let'sget you to a human and get you what you need faster like. How do you managethat tension? Yeah? I think that it's going to depend on your business rightand, of course again that that's scale challenge that a lot of companies have.They may not be looking to send anyone to a live human being and if that's adecision that they've made for their business, then so you know that is okay.I can speak a bit to like what, Inter com, what we do for our own, acustomers is, it tends to be a self served first approach right, so we wantfolks to have an opportunity to find the content themselves etc, etcetera,but then we pretty quickly give them an opportunity to speak to a human right.So it's a matter of did that answer your question no and then they're sentinto a completely different cue, and then you can still kind of tear ortriage questions from there right. That's actually they could beinteracting with like resolution, both just saying: Hey, here's an article didthat answer your question. They say! No, you can then say. Okay, let me collecta little bit more information for me before I send you to a person right andyou can still then qualify that question a bit more. So then you cankind of Treag it on the back end in terms of priority based on a number ofdifferent factors. So I would say you know, I think the the best experiencesdon't allow anyone. This is rather obvious, but they don't allow anyone towalk away like without some sort of resolution, and sometimes that's goingto mean that you are kicking them to a human relatively quickly and somethingthat's going to mean that you take a second swing at sending them. You knowserving them up an answer of the automation. It just depends yeah and,on the human hand, off. This is probably stating the obvious too, but Iwould assume that one of the goals for your customers isnever to ask the customer for information that they've already givenonce they get to a human. Yes, that's a great, that's absolutely true like ifand that's where, that day, a layer that we talked about a comes into playright, if you have that we call it the CD customer data platform. If youalready have that information, you...

...should never be asking for it. It's apain in the butt as a customer, it's not efficient for the teammates eitherright, if it's all and it sometimes it's just a matter of making sure thatthe tool that you're utilizing for that central place for the communicationcomes, you know, is being managed by the by the team that it's there's justa dedicated window for like who is this person? What's their conversation,history like? How much are they spending with you? What have theypurchased in the past, like all of that, should be readily available to yourwraps yeah totally. It's especially in those human to human experiences. Wehave so much ability now to make them tech enabled and they're still human tohuman, but we can help our people help other people so much more effectively.Let's spend a minute on products. Marketing M, yes, SNEW, director ofProduct Marketing. You know, one of the goals of this show is to kind of bringsome of the walls down between teams and in this case, even sub teams. I'dlove for you to share any insights you have, for you know, assuming that mostlisteners are not product marketers, but no a product marketer and perhapsneed to have a better functional working relationship with them like. Inyour view, these aren't all like a direct question, but speak to this. Thespirit of this you know: What's the ideal relationship between productmarketing and the rest of the marketing team, or with product and Dev, I thinkyou referred to it as rand. I don't know if that's the same thing like youknow: product owners and product managers. What's the interface with aproduct marketer, how do you work with? And maybe what are your deliverable, orwhat do you expect to get from your customer success team like Weird EstProduct Marketing in your experience and opinion? How do you plug into theorganization overall yeah? I will say this is one area that I was reallydelightfully impressed with when I started at intercom was how valued andhow central product marketing is to the entire organization. So you know it'sspeaking really directly. I spent a lot of my time partnering with those R NDleaders really the product management...

...leaders, but I also spend a decentamount of my time lazing with sales leaders and with finance leaders as itrelates to the pricing packaging for example, and then support plays. It plays a role here ina lot of ways we're actually kind of partnered up with our support team,especially since we sell to so other support leaders right there in in valueto more kind of like yeah yeah. Exactly so, not only are we as a marketing team,specifically as a product marketing team, trying to take the insights thatthey are fielding from their interactions with customers and andfiguring out. Should we be C, you know? Should we beworking with our help center content writers to be addressing some of theseconsistent questions? Should we be working with product to actuallyaddress some of these product gaps that seem to be surfacing and we get some ofthose insides in terms of product gaps? Road Mat needs also from our solutionteam, because we have sort of a scaled support model across our business.rerelative managers that are working with or managed customers, and then oursupport team. That's working more with kind of the wealth of a very long taleof folks, and so ultimately, product marketing sits at the middle of it all,and the same goes for within marketing product marketing when leverage to itsfull potential and when fully staffed, and all those caveats really should belike setting the tone for what you're saying in the market, we should be infront of you know getting in front of customers and understand directlyhearing what they're asking for how they're you know what they're findingwith in your products to be great we're just about to tee up our first customeradvisory board. Probe Marking team is, you know, leading the charge on that toreally start to create more of this, like two way, dialogue with some of ourtop customers were working directly with the brand team on like hey here's,what we think we should be saying. How...

...do you think that translates into youknow your big figure branding initiatives for the year? Where isthere a calms play? What are the AR needs, etc, etc? We obviously partnerwith our studio team to actually create assets for specific releases or withour content team, to make sure that these topics that we want to own andthat we're building towards between and as agreed between, product marketingand products. You know that we are actually talking about them and theassets that we create we're supplying the demand Gen team, with some of this,like the INS and outs like what again like what are the topics we want to own.How would we talk about certain things and it just kind of keeps going fromthere on the sale side? You know we are making sure that we understand what thecustomer journey looks like the sales cycles look like and are kind offielding, often times at least our current position is, were fielding,requests for specific slides assets, etc that they need in order to sellmore larger deals, and so anyway, that's a that's a little bit of aramble just to say that, like product marketing is incredibly central to theorgan, it's and that's reflected within marketing an intercom as well. I canreflect on a previous experience that wasn't always the case right. I thinkthere can be a tendency to keep product marking a little bit of a box wherethey end up just being the messaging arm sort of it's a lot. You know thelast push to to mark it, but but when it's really done well, productmarketing is ideally a group of individuals who know exactly what your customer currentcustomers are looking for, understand the prospect landscape, if that'sdifferent from your current customers, and you can really help to shapeproduct decisions much earlier on in the process, who are involved in likecrafting potential stories that you want to be able to tell based on whatyou develop over time and that ultimately, are kind of more of thisend and approach versus just sort of that last leg of like okay, we builtthis. I've been in this position literally, where it's like you, webuilt it over yeah. We want to launch...

...it in a month. What do you need rightand there's just so many better ways to partner and to run things really good?How much of even in that unhealthy situation? How much of yourcommunication is to inform internally about? What's going on with productversus externally yeah? It's a bit of a mix, I would say I personally spendmost of my time internally, but we also have our product. Marketers are centralto our external pushes as well. So like here's an example. Actually our producteducation team last year spent up what we call built for you, which is sort ofthe externalization of our product, road mass as it's shift, and so ourproduct marketers partner, with that team, every quarter to come up with awhole bunch of assets that basically articulate some of the kind of theaggregate benefits of some of those smaller releases that maybe didn't getlike the full. You Know Shiny, tear one launch in quarter, but are still reallyvaluable, especially to our current customers and so they're, leading onthose Weben ars. Alongside the folks from product education. They arehelping to craft. You know the blog post that supports it, Ecce, etc, andso it's a bit of both like I spend a lot of my time. Just sort of internallyeducating on what it is like, we feel we need to do. What are the narrativesthat we've selected? How are we going to be consistent in those over time?How is what we're going to ship going to support those stories, but my teamdoes spend a decent amount of their time, also just actually evangelizingthat message onto the world awesome product, marketing, obviously centralto the customer experience in part because of its effect on the employeeexperience and every like. I love this integrated, I'm glad that that we tookthat pass through product marketing, because I think it brings peopletogether in a way that will allow multiple different teams to deliver aconsistent experience which is yeah what we should all try to do now. I didmention that not everyone, listening is...

...a product marketing person, but we havehad two product marketers, probably more, but two that came to mind. Onewas on episode. Seventy two SHANEEN ZUR FROM CRUNCH BASE head of MarketingMedia and Growth. There is a product marketer by background. We called thatbetter marketing through product sales and customer conversations. You'vealready said that you do a bunch of those conversations yourself, so that'skey. That was episode. Seventy two and then on episode, one a D: Sixteen withLauren Culbertson. She has found her in CEO at loop VOC but prior to found cofounding that company. She was an eight year product marketer at black, bad andfounded that company and part to solve. One of her problems is a productmarketers, so that was episode, Ned d, sixteen closing both loops with Voiceof the customer. Before I let you go Ali, I would love for you to do twothings actually three, but to right now think or mention someone who's had apositive impact on your life or your career and to give a nod or a shout outto a brand or a company. You appreciate for the experience that they deliverfor you as a customer yeah. So the individual who had a really big impacton my career, is Lauren Vaccaro she's, the Mo at talent, and she actuallyhired me at a roll. Seven years ago, now, six and a half years now, sevenand a half and and the reason why I cite Lauren- is we actually didn't worktogether for that long? We were working together for I believe about eightmonths, but she's really proved to be a pretty invaluable mentor and justanswer of questions and both reactively and also just she's, practically sharedinformation with me over the years as it relates to not just great marketingand the things that she's thinking about in the prod trap. You knowproblem she's trying to solve, but like how much should I be getting paid atany given time right and and just helping to sort of peel the likemystique back around career progression, because he actually, I mentioned shehired me an out roll, because that was my first foray into tech and I didn'thave the historical reference of career ladders, s and salary expectations, etcand she's always been pretty...

...transparent with me, and I've justreally appreciated that and she's like very funny and just a generally kickass, impressive, marketer, and so I've just been sort of like soaking ininformation from her just by being in her general proximity over the lastseven and a half years, and then a company that I really enjoy a littlebit obscure. So when the pandemic sad set in last spring, my husband and Ifound that we were trying to cook for ourselves all the time- and you know myfree meals at work were no longer available to me and we were just likeover cooking and we were spending way too much money on lunches out, and sowe actually started using this company called Nibble, it's N Y B ll and theydo weekly mail deliveries and one of the reasons I so. Some of the reasonswhere I like them is the really proactively communication and they'rereally flexible on like the plants, so they've got their baseline plans, butwe've sent a few like kind of obscure, recommend our request. Over the lastyear, like hey, I don't really like Jack Fruit and your giving it to meonce a week and they're always willing to accommodate we reach out about theirpackaging at one point and they actually were willing to change it forus I like so there was less plastic waste and then there you know we knowexactly when their drivers going to be there to deliver to us by hand. Everyweek, so just a really positive customer experience. Overall, I love it.It sounds like they're listening and adapting to customers needs. That's, sowhat all of us should be doing every day you gave us some really goodinsights in how to do that. I appreciate your time so much alley. Ifpeople want to follow up with you or learn more about Intercom, where wouldyou send them? I would say I'm pretty easy to find on link in its just AliAli Biggs. You can find me send me a note on there. That's probably theeasiest way awesome and it's intercom inter come at io or COM, dad io yeahthere. It is, and, of course, we link...

...all this stuff up at Bombombay Ali.Thank you so much for your time today really enjoyed it. Thank you. I did aswell thanks you if tin, clear communication, human connection, higherconversion. These are just some of the benefits of adding video to themessages your sending every day. It's easy to do with just a little guidanceto pick up the official book. Rehumanize your business, how personalvideos, accelerate sales and improve customer experience learn more in ordertoday, at Bomboma's book, that's B, O M B Bomb Com book thanks for listening tothe customer experience. podcast remember the single most importantthing you can do today is to create and deliver a better experience for yourcustomers, continue learning the latest strategies and tactics by subscribingright now in your favorite podcast player, or visit Bom Bomo podcast t.

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