The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode 142 · 4 months ago

142. Don't Just Personalize, Get Personal w/ Kristina Jaramillo

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

When marketing speaks to one-to-many, we’re addressing industries. When we speak to one-to-few, we’re addressing personas. But personal relevance in one-to-one messaging means that we speak to how unconsidered gaps will affect that individual specifically.

In this episode, I interview Kristina Jaramillo, Founding Partner at Personal ABM, about the difference between personalized and personal ABM — and why the key is CX.

Kristina talked with me about:

- What putting the customer first really means

- How you should be using LinkedIn

- Personalized vs. personal ABM

- Who to target and how to target them

- The relationship between ABM and CX

Subscribe, listen, and rate/review the Customer Experience Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play, or Google Podcasts, and find more episodes on our blog.

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When companies are doing it best, Ithink is they're putting the customer first, and I know everyone always saystheir customer centric, but you actually have to prove it. The singlemost important thing you can do today is to create and deliver a betterexperience for your customers, learn how sales marketing and customersuccess experts create internal alignment, achieve desired outcomes andexceed customer expectations in a personal and human way. This is thecustomer experience podcast, here's your host ethen, but winning accounts, protecting accountsand expanding accounts, not with a personalized approach, but rather witha truly personal approach. That's what today's guest helps her clients withevery day as president and founding partner of personal ab m a decade ago,she left the corporate world on this entrepreneurial journey and now focuseson account based marketing to produce sales conversations she's, helpingsoftware companies and supply chain firms, add a personal layer to theirapproach in order to win, protect and expand. High value accounts, ChristinaHarami. Welcome to the customer experience podcast. Thank you so muchfor having me and I'm excited to have this conversation, it's something Ireally fashioned about. Yeah me too, I really enjoy the work that you do. Idid not attend the event that you put on last year, but I saw a lot about itread a lot about it. I listened to a couple podcast where you talk where youwere talking about it, and the conversation we're going to have todayis right in zone for what we're trying to do here on the podcast, which iskind of reduce silos and create better conversations and better alignment notto just to get better results, but in order to serve our customers better-and I know you've got a lot to offer on this. So we'll get straight into it.When I say customer Experience Christina. What does that mean to youall right? Customer experience to me is also goes with hand to hand withprospect experience, but it's every interaction that sails marketingaccount management. Anyone who's bier facing has, and that means theinteractions are having on social interactions, either an email or evenlive communications, or now you know virtual communications and how theyfeel after the interaction. There's a quote from Tiffany bowlby that I reallylike she's now at sales force. I think she said this before that she mentionedhow you sell and market matters. Your sales and marketing process is ourmatter, but how prospects and customers feel when they engage with you mattersmore and that last part is really the best part. I think of that sentence.Prospects or quote how prospects and customers feel when they engage withyou matters more than anything else, but I'm seeing a lot of sales andmarketing not focusing enough of their time and interactions with prospectsand with customers, because they're really campaign based- and I think it'sthey forget- that in most cases you have one chance to win protector,expand accounts, one communication, mis fire, one wrong interaction, one badprospect or customer experience is going to have a detrimental effect.It's going to result in UN responsiveness may be in action. Maybethey just let their contract with you expire and that's the end of it. But alot of sales of marketing account and customer teams are traditionallyspeaking at industries and at volumes of account just to get scale with verylittle zero relevant. So when firms engage in accounted base approach, theyoften speak, it accounts with the same messaging and don't consider that valueis different from person to person within the same account and they're,not speaking of the people within the target accounts to try to create thathuman bond and not directly going to hey decision makers, which is reallyimportant and influences with the insides that are specific to their gaps,their impacts and content that speaking to them. Specifically, I reallyappreciate how quickly and specifically you went straight to the individualthere. I think that really sets up a lot of where will be in conversationtogether today, but I also love that quote from Tiffany Bova and I agree-that's been a theme here in these questions and responses right off thetop, which is how we make people feel...

...matters as much or more than anythingelse, and I think it's because from a scientific standpoint, emotions driveboth memory and motivation, and so, if there's going to be any action, it isgoing to be emotionally inspired, and so this ability to make people feelpositively or to feel something specific to your product or service.The outcome, the nature of your relationship together. I think you'resetting yourself up to be remarkable in some way and to actually drive behaviorand at to your point when we're just like blasting things out, because itfeels good on a report to have bigger numbers that we could tend to losetrack of. How we're making people feel in that process is something we atbombum called digital pollution. And you know we are polluters ourselves attimes it's not a perfect process, but I think it's important to keep in mind sowe're trying to raise that conversation. So before we get too much farther, Iwould love for you to share with people what you're doing at personal ab m. Youknow who's yourideal customer there. I already mentioned two of the primarygroups that you serve and what problems are you solving for those people, suresure so personally, B M if anyone's not familiar with Ab Personal Account BaseMarketing? So we work with SASS technology supply chain and other retefirms that sell into the enterprise that are looking to create six or sevenfigure deals and our clients are not looking for Leeds. They want morerevenue, they want faster revenue, growth with tear on it counts, becausewe are only focused on revenue and tear one accounts and how we're gettingthose conversations to revenue. So many abmarsch companies that engage in Abinkind of focus on filling the pipe line with engaged accounts, but we focus onfour different areas that tend to create the best result. So the firstone is accounts that are not in market yet they're stuck in status quo,they're, not responding to general pain, point messaging that maybe sells amarketing setting out. So they need more personal relevance, adifferentiated prospect experience where you work with them to create thatfire vision or buying vision. Typically, that I'll also create a larger dealsize. We also work with a count that are previously showed intent, but forsome reason became engaged. Typically, we see it's because they don't seethemselves in the story that sales and marketing is telling and that emotionalconnection is not being made and or a business case was not proven. A thirdarea that we work with his councilor, stuck in the middle or the by bottom ofthe buying journey. So in many cases sales and marketing were may be unableto create a experience for the internal discussions that they might not beprivy to. So they weren't able to make that credit or drive by and consensus theydid put by our enablement program in place, and then the last are that wework with is existing counselor at risk or existing accounts that are notexpanding because they're having tactical discussions with sales andmarketing around activities completed and general benefits and not driving astrategic conversation, that's may be engaging with the the decision maker,so the VP's and the C sweet awesome. I think we'll get into some specific. Iwill ask of you some specific tips for how to create more emotion,specifically mid the bottom of funnel, and also perhaps on that expansion side.But before we do like how did you what was the process? It doesn't surprise methat you have a very well defined Ip right like mid market companies thatsell to the enterprise six to seven figure deals in these particularindustries and for you, it's primarily Sassan supply chain. What was yourprocess of discovering that like? Is this something that you've been focusedon for eight years or is this something you've been focused on for the past fewyears like what was the process of getting so specific with who you knowyou can serve best yeah? That's a good question. Well, for starters, we'vealways been Betabel, but we had started with small to medium size companies.Even you know, under five people companies, but we realized that theplatform that we used happens to be linked in it's just our platform ofchoice is really where you could get with buyers and engage with fires, andwe kind of realized that you know there...

...were a lot of technology people. Therewere a lot of software people using Lindon to learn to gain valuableinsights to improve their jobs, improve their their roles. So that's how wekind of figure that you know tecon and SASS would work really well and thathas been a focus for at least eight years and supply chain has only beenmaybe the last five years or so, but because we realized it was such anindustry that had a really hard time, differentiating themselves from one toanother supply chain. Logistic, three pl, that kind of space is very everyone,sounds the same, so it's very easy to differentiate, but no one's actuallydoing it. So we kind of were brought into that arena and we figured that itworked really well, we got some awesome results. We kind of expanded from thereawesome we're going to talk about sales and marketing. We're talk aboutAbmelech, just staying on the theme of Customer Experience in particular, andthe way that you defined it when you think about some of the clients thatyou've helped. You know, build these various campaigns for various stages ofrelationship all with the revenue orientation. What are some things thatthe best companies that you work with do well with regard to producingpositive feelings with people and or what are a lot of companies missinghere, all right, so when companies are doing it best, I think is they'reputting the customer first, and I know everyone always says their customercentric, but you actually have to prove it, and one of the best ways to do it Imentioned Lincoln before, is to go to a bunch of sales. People's profiles onLinton and see who it's written for. Is it written for them to get a new salesposition, or is it written for the customer they're actually looking toserve the customers there actually they're serving now clients thatthey've helped recently and sharing stories? And that's like a big big areaof focus when we work with clients is that's the first thing that we try tofix, because no matter how you're trying to get to access a prospector, acustomer if you're engaging with them- and they see the first thing that t youwant to engage with them- is all about you all about your quota. All aboutyour sales achievements, it's kind of off putting and they don't want to beanother number. They don't want to be at another cog in your wheel to get youto your next promotion or next president's Club. They want to knowthat you have the experience to help them the value that you're going togive them. So that's where we start, and I think the companies that aredoing that and actually putting the customer first on Linton, but also inthe content. They're sharing the messaging they're, putting out any kindof interaction and treating every little touch point with a customerprospect as a mini sales conversation those of thecompanies that are doing it well and doing it right, because I talked about earlier one communication:Mis Fire can lead to a deal, that's get stuck or it just goes unresponsive. SoI think that's that's what I say, but the best companies are doing. I lovethat tip so for folks for listening, there's a sixty second back button. Fora reason. That's so you can go sixty second back sixty seconds back rightnow and put this on your to. Do List for today or tomorrow, look at yourlinked in profile if you were using linked in to generate business anddegenerate sales. Conversations look at who it's written, for who isthe about section written for? What are your bullet points under your role? Ilove this idea, Christina of setting yourself up as an expert orientedtoward the problems or opportunities faced by your primary customers, and soit seems so intuitive, but I would guess that if I did this across some ofthe people that I know people I like Friends of mine, I would guess that alot of them really are a lot of the you know you not necessarily a bad personfor wanting to prop yourself up and look really good. That's your the night.It looks a heck of a lot more attractive to a potential employer thanit does to a potential customer, which I think is a really interesting dynamicand it kind of implied in your response there, and I think this is true of you.I would expect that it is so I'd love...

...for you to share anything on it. Youknow I feel like what you're setting up here is the idea of making yourselfavailable as a you know, to use a common phrasetrusted adviser to use a less common phrase. You know kind of an industry,expert type of person or perhaps even a teacher for this particular type ofperson or industry, or role talk about that dynamic a little bit I mean.Obviously, I think the best sales are being done in partnership, perhaps withan educational bent with an effort to help and serve rather than again justto make your way to President's Club, which is probably a nice thing, isprobably going somewhere. Nice is probably actually going this year, youprobably at getting on a plane, sometimes soon like last year, but talkabout that dynamic a little bit, because I really heard that in yourresponse of what your linked in profile looks like, I think you know it's nofault of anyone t I think they just assails people and marking people don'tthink about it. This way I mean like there was kind of set up initially tobe kind of like a job networking site, but it's totally evolved, and I thinkthat if you make it sure that it's written for your more of a teacheryou're more of a someone that they can learn from I'm going to be. I knowpersonally- and I know from my experience with clients and things thatpeople are going to be more respective, to an invite to connect to a nurturemessage to maybe even a call later down the line if they know that they havelearned something from you, you've added value to them, you've sharedcontent with them that is relevant to them. It helps themselve a challengethat they're having, even if it gets them a little insight. Littlecommercial insight, which is really important, you know, helps them thinkof differently of how they're actually doing their role on a day to day basis.As opposed to saying you connected with me now, I'm going to try to get you ona Demoin to try to get you on a sales call within fifteen minutes ofsomething accepting my connection. You know here's my calender link, let's geton the call you have to actually you know warm that conversation up and ifyou can say that, just by looking at you a profile or just by the contentthat you're sharing or any post that you're putting out there if it feelslike you're communicating to share real with relevant value and give an actualintention, people are going to be more responsive. I mean last year linkedinto the study, I believe, right after mayor two months into the C nineteen.They show that organizations were seeing about forty four percent reportin significant and a significant decline in a responsiveness. And youknow, a lot of people were blaming it on the pandemic and the change of theeconomy and the change of the environment, and I think it was part ofthe issue, but I think it's just been a downward trend that was exasperated bythis, and you know it's because people are not putting themselves in the buyer orcustomer shoes and saying what would I want from a seller? Do I want toactually have a by and selling relationship, or do I want a partnerteacher kind of relationship, someone I can learn from awesome? I thinkprobably the biggest trouble is people developing their voice. You know they.We say that people find their voice like you have to find your voice, youdon't find it you develop it, and so I would just say to any sales person orMarke or listening at that is in this really any revenue professional. Whenyou think about what Christina just offered, you have a lot more to sharethan you may even recognize, because, especially if you have a really goodfocus, however, you think about a persona Ip, if you're talking to avariety of people who all share a set of criteria together, you have a lot toteach other people who fit two or three of those criteria, and it's just amatter of offering it out for conversation. Sometimes asking you aquestion: You don't it doesn't you don't have to be the first person everto say something for it to be useful and you don't have to say it betterthan anyone else is just really starting. The conversation at all issomething that not enough people are doing kind of to your point there,while we're on linked in something I loved about the about section of yourlinked in profile and I'm just going to read it. It's just one line and thenwe'll talk about a couple different aspects of it. So the line is this: Onedomeny marketing drives awareness, but it's too impersonal to move hearts andminds, and so we can take this one step...

...at a time. But I think, what's in hereis this idea of personal versus personalized, which I would love to getyour thoughts and observations and opinions on and the other piece thatI'd like to get to, and it probably connects back to the feel language thatwe were talking about in your definition of customer experience orTiffany, Bova's or sub combination of yours, and hers is the hearts and mindspeace. This idea that we need to speak to whole people and not just to youknow some rational argument, collecting part of someone's brain so talk aboutone Domini marketing and why it's too impersonal yeah. So I think the issue that I findwith it and why it's to impersonal, one to many marketing, speaks to generalassumptions. General Pain points. So when you speak to many, you speak atindustries, which means there's very little: personalization you're, hopingthat you're going to catch someone. That's painpont is a ten on the painscale, so they want to take action now, but you know the chances of findingsomeone that they're paying point is at ten on the paint scales like finding aneedle in a haystack. So it's making it much harder for you as a sales ormarketing or customer leader and in many cases the pain point is you knowlow on the scale for people and you're just competing with the number of otherpriorities and another thing with responding to general assumptions withas one to many and paying points is probably very similar to what yourcompetitors are doing so there. You are also going to sound the same. So that'sthe problem with with one to many not being able to get as personal as youcan. So the one a few you speak to personas within market accounts, youspeak to the industries that you're personalizing it to industry, butyou're, still speaking at accounts, you're still speaking at the buyersrather than to them. So you're missing that personal relevance. You know, andin many cases with that approach you focus on what target acant are searching for, somaybe you're using intent, data or maybe you're. You know using otherother technology to help. You figure that out, but you know we spoke aboutthis before is personal relevance and personal ation is very different. Whenyou are personally relevant, you go beyond tailoring content and messagingfor what accounts are searching for you beyond campaigns based on generalize,persones and assumptions and pain points. You speak at gaps, especiallyunconsidered gaps that the person might have and the personal impacts to themand their role, not just for the organization. How is it going toactually impact them specifically, and you challenge prospects, specificassumptions and you speak to their domain in a way that they haven'tthought of. They haven't appreciated, they have, it may be considered, andyou show that you understand their specific use case and suggest a new wayof solving their problems and you can reframe how they think about theirbusiness and how they operate. So, there's a couple of things that you'regoing to be able to uncover when you do this, what's behind the prospectsintent so that they were searching for something and you found they were usingthe keyboard, that's relevant to you. What's behind it? What's that milliondollar headache, and you know both on the account level so their organization,but also on their personal level? How is that headache affecting them? What'sgoing on within the organization at the different divisions that can impact inoperational excellence? How can impact customers? How could it even impacttheir pl, depending who you're talking to- and another thing I consider, iswhat are the account specific or competitor focus gaps that are notbeing considered? What have they not thought of and how those personalimpacts you know being maybe either not considered or but they, you know, mightbe a bigger problem than they thought. How are they being underestimated? Thatpersonal connection that we've been talking to with the human buyers is howyou're going to shift those hearts shift minds and, more importantly,shift wallets with the biggest part of the market, which is about sixtypercent that are stuck in status quo and also those that have becomedisengaged because they're, not you, know, they're, not seeing their storyor themselves in the story. That's how we were able to help a supply chain andtech company create two million dollar closes protectat risk accounts and growmargins, and even reverse no or we'll...

...talk about this later in six monthskind of position and expand even accounts within territories anddepartments, because we were taking that very personal relevant one to oneapproach. Why do so few, like? It seems kind ofobvious to me? I think the answer to my question is kind of obvious to so I'll,probably ask it with an answer, but then I let you take it somewhere elselike if we know intuitively as buyers and even as sellers like as buyersourselves and as sellers. We know what has worked in the past. We know thatthe more personal we can be truly one to one like bespoke communication,actually thinking about someone in a seat in a company in an industryinstead of everyone in seats that look like this, that or the other. We knowthat that's more effective. We know that it makes people feel betterbecause they feel seen and appreciated and helped and served probably ifyou're doing it well. Why does this feel like a revelationlike why? Why aren't more people doing is? Is it simply because I need scale,I need bigger numbers. I need a fatter pipeline, even though I'm converting itat fifteen percent like. Why are why aren't more people do? Why isn't thisthe default? In your experience? So in my experience, the first thing thatpeople say well, you can't scale that and the idea is not to necessarilyscale abambo scale, the learnings from a bim and when you take a personalabmarsch, so that's the reason. We've also niched ourselves to only dealwhat's here, one to cast, because this is a time consuming approach. Thistakes a lot of work, takes a lot of manpower. It takes a lot of research sothat you're only going to do use it with accounts that are going to be sixseven figure plus because they're going to be larger accounts but say let's sayyou pick. You know two three, dozen top to your won to counts, you're, going torun these kind of AB programs with whatever you learn. Whatever insightsyou gain. Whatever knowledge you get from, you know, what's working, what'snot working, you can scale that out to tear two and ter three, but I thinkbecause we are, I know, marketing as a whole. I'm sure this goes across otherparts. The organization are really focused on building a pipeline top ofthe funnel filling it filling it, but not necessarily focused on the quality and where thoseleads going, are they actually going all the way through to revenue? Arethey getting stuck in the middle? Are they not even going past the top? Sobecause it's such a you know niched or hard to approach people I think, getintimidated, but I think if you implement it that way and look at itthrough that kind of Lens, that it's not for every account that it will beeasier to kind of use it and and adopt it to aspects of it to other parts ofyour marketing and sales. I love it. It's probably the answer to something Iobserved in you know preparing for this. I saw some of your case studies whereyou know win rates are sixtyseven. Seventy five percent. You know where Idon't know what the average is for companies like these, but I would guessit's probably closer to twenty percent, and I would bet that that tension isright where you just were, which is quality versus quantity. I mean we needto figure out both. We can't just you know in theory, you know you could justkeep focusing on quality quality quality quality, so you've got a coupleaccounts and you can converted ninety percent rate, but still miss the number,and so is that the key and the tension is, is more emphasis on quality,probably disqualifying more accounts sooner in order to increase increase,win rates, which then allows US probably to put more of our limitedtime and energy and effort and human time in particular and other resourceswe invest in developing these relationships. In these accounts, wecan put them where they probably matter most yeah, absolutely and it's and I don'twant to just want to go back it doesn't it. This personally, am is not an allor nothing approach it's in conjuction...

...with campaigns, because you're alwaysgoing to need them, but the reason that how win rates for us are so much higheris because we're actually named a count. So I t our clients will say we have aPNG account that we want to protect or we want to get a new logo. An oracle weknow is a good fit, and this is why so, every stage of the program of the ABNprogram we're looking at it so closely to see if it actually is a fit becauseit just because it was a fit last week, doesn't me to still a fit this week.Should we still be taking this kind of focus with them? So it's almost likewe're looking at po holes in it as to why it might not work. What is theissue that's coming about? Did they do we find out that they're, you knowfreezing spending for the next six months. Did we find out that they'rethey just got a whole new round of funding, there's all different thingsthat can happen so because they're so niched and so targeted. That's why youknow the wind rates are so much higher, and going back to that quote, Imentioned about Tiffany Bova, how you sell a market matter so h, your salesand pro marketing process are going to matter what it comes to this. So howyou're going to go back to making that prospect feel when they engage with you.The key is, is the experience that you deliver, so does your profile? Doesyour content? Does your messaging speak to these target accounts the humanbuyers within the accounts? Is there a real intention behind every interaction,every communication, every message, every article you send, are you helpingprospects, see their gaps and impacts at their company level down to theirdivision, rank personal, financial, all the way down to customer level so thatyou can help them create that buying consists consensus internally and areyou enabling customers with the confidence they need to make thatdecision, because everyone knows no decision is always easier than making adecision is particularly if you, you know it's a large investment yeah. Icould, as should a would have done this, maybe ten or fifteen minutes ago, butthere's so much groundwork to be laid. I'd. Love for you. Just to talk aboutAB M in general is obviously it's obviously a compis marketing, but maybespeak to it at a couple levels. I think for those that don't really knowanything about it, but have seen it that you know it definitely feels buzzwordy. I think for people who aren't necessarily in sales or marketing, youhave some passing familiarity with it, like maybe their team members and salesare marketing, are talking about Abmelech, I think for people who have abasic understanding. They might think that it's just like hey, I'm going tosubscribe to some software and run some targeted advertising where I'm onlyrunning these ads at these accounts. You've obviously gotten to a lot morenuance there, but for the sake of getting clear on it, and particularlyfor my interest in your own philosophy on it, how do you talk about Ab m likehe's, because you said like what you've been talking about is not the only wayto do it. It's not the only aspect of it. It's kind of like a both and likewhat are some of the layers or some of the approaches, or you know where doessoftware and tech fit in with Abama, is share anything to have on account basedmarketing in general? Why is it? Why does it feel like it's new? Why does itfeel like it's a buzz word? Yeah, it totally is a bus work. It's a huge buzzword. I don't think that it's new, I think it just got be given a name socau I've heard it called account. Base marketing a CAPPE sales account basedstrategy. Whatever it is, it's just going after you know targeted actualaccounts, but an a lot of people, a lot of says and marketing teams are lookinginto it because it's been so widely used and their CSENGERY. You know somebusinesses that are taking an interesting approach or taking a morestrategic approach or seeing significant business impact withAbmarsch, and I think the ones that aren't is because the the you knowthey're turned atmo tactical, so it's become a cant based awareness accountbased advertising, like you mentioned, even a count: basely generationprograms, especially when they have the addition of Abemethy like terminus anddemand base, which are awesome tools but they're only a part of the strategy.So you know the technologies are great. You know, and some of our clients evenuses platforms, but again only tools...

...and ab m is so much more than that.It's not just tools, it's not a tactic. It's an actual business strategy is abusiness strategy which is insuring accounts that would have the greatestimpact actually get to revenue and existing counts lead to even morerevenue, so that that's the where I see that there's a big difference. So thismeans that the sales marketing and account management need to worktogether. So this isn't just a marketing thing. This isn't just asales thing. It's the whole organization. You know they need towork together to create the desired experience, especially with the tar onaccounts versus worrying about scaling, because you know I'm sure everyone'sheard this stat, that eighty percent of your revenue comes from twenty percentof your accounts. So if we're really focusing on scaling you'reautomatically impacting the interactions we have and the experienceof prospects and clients have- and it might not be the one that you want, soyou can't scale personal. You know it's really impossible to scale personalinteractions and personal experiences. What you do, as you scale what youlearn from applying those strategies to tear one like I mentioned earlier tothe other aspects of your at reach- love it. I was just kind of envisioningthis idea of sales and marketing being much more involved, post sale withtheir time and energy, not just to learn to do better on the on the frontside of the relationship, but in order to be a value in service to accountmanagement taking what they learned and what worked pre commitment to apply toin the relationships develop to apply that post sale in order to turn yourgood accounts into fantastic accounts, just to continue solving problems forthem or Jusso the same problem from where people in that organization allthe other ways we expand. You said revenue a few times there. I would lovefor you. Obviously, revenue is the goal. If you spend any time on linked in likeyou and I do like probably most listeners, do you hear things likesales and marketing alignment? You hear things like the MTL is dead and weshould just throw it in the garbage and it's all revenue revenue like there's alot here in it. You can offer like legit info or offer opinion or offerprovocation, do whatever you want with this. But obviously revenue is theultimate goal. I personally feel like there are precursors to revenue that weneed to be tracking that do need to be on the board that we do need to betalking about. We might over worship them. It might make us a little bit toosilent in our thinking if we over focus on these things, but for you like whatare some metrics that are obviously vanity metrics to you and or where somereally good important metrics that are precursors to revenue that we shouldpay attention to no matter who, on linked in post, about it being dead, yeah, so vanity metrics- and I knowsome people are going to disagree with me in this clicks on a post like Sun, apost comment, Cenopolis Post that don't add value or actual engagement. Soanything that says great post great idea. Thanks for sharing that to me,doesn't really count for much. I understand my marketing tends to track it. It just not something that Iam I concerned with, so that type of thing traffic to certain particulararticles might not be, or certain particular landing pages might not be.On my top ten, I think things that are more important are. Are we shorteningthe sales cycle time? Are we improving wind rates? Are we growing deal sizesas a whole? Are we reducing customer turn? Are we increasing customerlifetime value- and I know pipeline is a big thing, but are those pipe line?Conversion converting to revenue with key accounts- you know, are your ABNprograms working? That would be a great way to track it. Are you expanding itsNew Territories? Are you expanding accounts and then, obviously, overallrevenue growth is always something that is really important, and I thinksomething that probably gets overlooked is the interactions that lead to it. Soare you getting further down the line? Are you engaging with a champion? Are you engaging with adecision maker? Are they getting more people involved? In the conversation?Are you able to you know as a sale,...

...seller or marketer Customer SuccessPerson? Are you able to open that door get more by in, and you know like, ifyou're looking to expand that account? Are you having engagement with peopleother than the you know, the operations, people or the people that are usingyour service or or tool, are you getting by and for their decisionmakers there, people that are actually going to say whether they expand withyou or you know, continue their contract with you love it. I love thisfocus on relationships and somehow, obviously keeping really good notes onit, but perhaps even making a bigger deal out of it. You know in terms ofsome of the boards that we use for reporting and understanding andstorytelling internally. This idea of how many relationships, like directconnections, have we made and did we establish them ourselves or weintroduced to these additional people like did we earn the trust of thisperson, so they opened the door to these other people kind of a scenario.I really like the way that you're you're thinking about that and talkingabout it. Let's get really tactical for a minute. What are what are a couple?Key Things: you think that could help people accelerate to revenue in middlebottom of funnel acquisition side middle to bottle a funnel okay. I thinkwhat happens is that a lot of sales and marketing leaders are not that working hand in hand. So recentlyI was on a a do on my podcast that you're going to be anything withCassandra, Jala she's, a path factories, senior director of marketing. Shementioned that she compares the buyers journey to the game. It's a kid's gamecall the floor is lava, I'm not sure people familiar with it. It's a netFlix TV show anyway you're supposed to get from one part of the room toanother, and you have to drop on it front. Obstacles Take Difor, jumpingpoints and not fall into the lava. So it's the same kind of thing with buyersyou want to get into that safe harbor. You want to make sure they don't fallinto the label halfway through their journey they're dropping from one rockto another and so on. So you kind of lay that path, that's very clear or tryto, but in many cases it's not clear. It's really, you know they take the fortwist and turns, and campaigns and messaging reinforce it. The needs wantsand ideas of the champion, but maybe they don't speak to the team. Theydon't speak to to the decision maker content is missing to, and you know, tosupport the internal conversation experience. Something that you know,sands and marketing might not be included on by our enablement is a keything of why these cats are getting stuck in the middle and bottom of thefunnel. I think the ABIN program, for example, mightlack buyer enablement. I was doing some research and I saw a study from Gartnerback in two thousand and nineteen that overwhelmed their be to be buyers, arereally overwhelmed and their face facing a crisis of confidence andthey're struggling to make large scale purchasing decisions and the actualroute cause of the research found was it's not that they are having issueswith the supplier offerings or the solutions. It's how they perceivethemselves they're, having a really hard time in having confidence to makethe right decision, and I think it's because there's so much information outthere that they are bombarded with it. Maybe sales and marketing is justpushing out they kind of can't decipher it, so they either are left withconfusion, no decision they fall into the lava because they just don't knowwhat to do, and this this study was, interestingly enough done before virushave had the world turn turned upside down in two thousand and twenty. So Ithink it's just going to get amplified now that we are, you know in today's digital environment,Bush pushing out more messaging and content and not pushing out messagingthe consent. That actually has intention. I think that's the mostimportant part is that, if you're using content and messaging an intentionalway, it's going to give people and buyers, especially more clarity intheir decisions versus you know, taking the easy way out, which is no decision,yeah, there's so much. I appreciate about what you offered there, but twothings in particular on this idea of more content isn't better. I mean thatthe every time you reach out to me...

...you're training me to engage with or toignore what you're sending me and if it's, if it's good I'll, keep engagingif it. If you have three goods and then a bad, I might still engage with thenext one, hoping that it's going to be another good. But if it's irrelevant distant irrelevant bad, anI'm done right, and so we only have like more is not better. So I reallyappreciate that point, and then this idea of buyer enablement, and at leastat least I'm sure you could tell me there are more, and so, when I'm donesaying this tell me if you've observed a lot more or the sounds about right,but in my opinion, is you're, developing kind of content, messagingand value ads for a particular account like the ones we've been talking aboutthe whole conversation. There are at least three audiences here. One is thefront line person who needs to implement, use or whatever, like theyare going to be affected day to day by this decision. Another one would beprobably like the mid level manager or the front line manager who needs notonly to implement this and train it and coach it into those frontline people,but that you know related but different concerns in a different valueproposition, essentially for whatever the product or service offering is, andthen at least one more which is whoever has to you know, sign the contract,write the check pay for it, justified it internally and probably has the mostat risk in terms of personal reputation and developing things that can help allof these people say. Yes, I see a better future with this company andtheir product or their service and their people. But you need to speak tothose different people to get that complete picture, obviously atdifferent stages of the relationship, but I'm sure it gets more nuance thanthat, but is that a approximately loosely right yeah? No, it totally ismost of the content that we have developed or even maybe tweak,depending on what a client has is written for actual named accounts, andwe even had a client come to us and say you know. We shared this particulararticle that you created for this organization. We had a sales devout orsales conversation with them and they said to us this article felt like itwas written for us and it totally was we just you know we didn't. We alludedto them. We didn't call them out by name, but the article was so relevantwith them that they could recognize it, and you know that's like the biggestcompliment. We know we're doing something right. We know we'reconnecting with them and then that's a great area, an opportunity to use thatparticular content with accounts that are similar to that them that are maybenot tear one like this count was so it totally it's written for the actualaccount and then you can use it another way. So it's not like a one size, a onetime deal and it's you know not Roldan any more. I love it. This great exampleof the scale you were talking about earlier s, taking those learnings andusing the mouse where really quickly same thing, tactical, but let's go postsale like what are a couple keys to improving experience at and after thepoint of commitment to reduce churn or to increase the likelihood of expansionin these key accounts. So the best thing that I like to talkabout- or something I think is most important- is to change the actualconversation. So don't talk about you know the tactical things you're doingthe you know what you're doing and the end of results. recieve yeah talk aboutit, but don't make the conversation more than that talk about the gas thatyou saw prior to working with them that they had the gaps that you uniquelyfilled, how you're currently filling them? Why you saw those gaps and youknow what you've learned and lessons along the way, and then you can kind ofopen the conversation up into areas we see for growth, so areas or we be theycan either expand with you or areas they can improve upon. So maybe you'reonly in one department of a large organization when they have six orseven that you could be helping so have changing. The conversation is supposedto benefits and results to more of total impacts. How is that challengethat you're fixing for them? How is it helping them, but how is it helpingother areas of the organization? How is it o helping the r organization as awhole? How is it helping their...

...customers? How is it helping theirbottom line? If you change the conversation, that's going to be a strategic partner conversation versus a vendorbuyer conversation yeah, really good. I think we also, probably in this zone,assume that they might know these things and that you know we don't needto tell them that it was like now. It's actually go ahead and tell it if theydo know, then that's good. That's going to be a good conversation. They can addsome nuance or detail to it that you might be missing or some context, but Ithink we probably take for granted again. You know how much we can be ofservice or value to other people. I like this call to change theconversation as you are listening to this conversation with Christina, andyou really like this idea of being more personal. More often, I've got two morethat I know you would also enjoy episode hundred an eleven with GregSegal. He is the founder and C E O of Alice, which is a gift platform thatsome people fold into these more personal approaches to accounts. Again,I was episode one eleven with Greg Cigal. We called that building apersonal experience into your customer experience, and he really he and histeam are really leaned into this language and are talking about PX orpersonal experience a lot more often and then episodes seventy one with Edbrial. He is the C Mo at a Primo. He is a c Mo who does have DRS DR reportingto him, and we called that conversation differentiating your brand byhumanizing the experience, and so he feels like the brand that he's buildingis going to be created almost exclusively through thepersonal connections that his team members are making with their customersand their perspective. Customers in this really important emphasis onhumanizing the experience in order to differentiate yourself from otherpeople. I mean you and your team might be saying something almost identical toa competitor. You reference that earlier Christine a lot of language cansound the same, but if it comes with a face in a voice literally orfiguratively, that I can have a sense of personality or that it's assigned,as you offer like a custom written article, that I can feel that it wasmade just for me, that's significantly differentiating in a lot of businessesso episode, one eleven with Greg. Segal episode, seventy one with that brial.But this is a conversation with Christina and so Christina before I letyou go, I would love for you to do two things for me. The first is to thank ormention someone who's had a positive impact on your life or your career, andthe second is to give a nod or a shout out to a brand or a company that youappreciate for the experience that they deliver for you as a customer all right. So, thank you so much forhaving me on your podcast. I really appreciate it ethen and I like that wewere able to help our hopefully help. Sales and marketing teams rethink theinteractions are having and then its experiences their giving prospects andcustomers, and I really honor to be listed among guess that, like you'vehad these people that I have interacted with myself and that I have learned agreat deal from msala notice, Hi Darrow, Pril, Jos feed to Caponi. Those are allreally cool guys that have a lot of insights, especially about making thatpersonal connection with their customers, and I wanted to they've hadbusiness impact positive in back on me and my business, but also want to thinkmy partner. Of course, Eric Gruber he's been riding the wild roller coasterride with me, and we've overcome a lot of challenges created by you, know, C,Nineteen. So that's really awesome and to discuss a company. That's doingcustomer experience right or what you mentioned P X or, like maybe prospect experience or personalexperience. I want to share a quick customer story that I think is reallyrelevant. We had worked with Schnader, which is a three P L with orange trucks.They had an account that was really unresponsive for fieles years becausethey were using that generic messaging in their in their particular industry.That's really common, so it was around better people, better process, bettertechnology. I've heard this in a lot of...

...organizations and a sure you have to so.They were trying to get some traction with sigma, which is a subsidiary ofanother organization, and they had heard that particular snider story fromthe competition because it sounded the same so they weren't seeing gaps inpersonal impacts or driving the change. They didn't see themselves in thatstory. That was being told, so they ignored any kind of outreach. They hadtried social. They had tried email phone. I think they'd even got inperson when you know a couple of years ago, and that was a thing, so this wasall from sales and marketing. It was multiple people trying to you know,gain some headway into this. So because this contented messaging didn't haveany commercial impact on the buyer, they were really getting ignored. Sowhat we did is we looked at their linton profile. We looked at you knowwho the connections they had and who they knew and that organization andthey had really great connections to the key decision makers. So the SPP ofsales at Schneider was connected to Sigma this company. They were goingafter their vp of logistics on Linton, but sales wasn't having the rightmessaging and content and right conversation for that human humanbuying connection we're talking about so we redesign their profiles and thecontent to show how they were mid, market organizations or being underserved, which is what sigma was and how their t, MS, which is transportationmanagement system, was not really useful for them. So we showed sigma howthey were being treated almost like a middle child because they weren't bigenough to be help helped by the big guys, but not small enough for thesmaller solutions. So we talked about their gaps, their impacts across theirentire organization from supply chain, the Pan Employees Service for formance,and you customers, that's a big thing for logistics. So, ultimately, wecreated these bicetre profiles and content to make this human team inconnection and they increase their relevance with sigma and they startedto pull business through and created a six month sale cycle when usuallytwelve to eighteen months, and they became an account that was worth abouttwo to six million, depending how long they were able to retain them as aclient. But this was all because of changing the conversation to speak tothe buyer as human love it it brings together. So many of the ideas thatyou've already shared with us here from the you know updating your linked inprofile to really speaking specifically to that ki can even see an articlewritten to you know. Are you too big for this, but too small for that kindof a scenario? I don't know exactly how that was executed, but so many thingsyou shared there came to life in that story. It's a great outcome. ChristinaI've really enjoyed the conversation, and if someone is listening right nowthey obviously did too. So where would you send them to connect with you? Iassume Linin's probably a great place: where can they learn more aboutpersonal ab M et ce? Where would you send people to follow up on? Thisdefinitely send me a personal message on Linkin. You know why we shouldconnect, why we should add value to each other or how we could have valueto each other, Cristina had a MEO or Jermiah and definitely check outpersonally mom, and we also have a podcast stop the sales drop and that'sa community full of articles, videos, podcast Ethan's, going to be on it aswell, and I suggest people check that out as well awesome really quickly.What is the sales drop? What is the sales trop? Basically, why are peoplenot? Why are they following it falling out of the funnel or kind of gettingstuck in the fuel? So that's when you kind of like drop the ball awesome verygood. I look forward to spending more time with you and conversation. I lookforward to sharing this with listeners and I appreciate your time so much.Thank you, clear, communication, human connection, higher conversion. Theseare just some of the benefits of adding video to the messages your sendingevery day. It's easy to do with just a little guidance to pick up the officialbook. Rehumanize your business, how personal videos, accelerate sales andimprove customer experience learn more in order today, at bombance book,that's B, O M B Bomb Com fuck thanks for listening to the customerexperience. podcast remember the single most important thing you can do todayis to create and deliver a better experience for your customers, continuelearning the latest strategies and...

...tactics by subscribing right now inyour favorite podcast player, or visit Bom Bambo podcast t t.

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