The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode 143 · 5 months ago

143. Hiring and Onboarding Virtual Professionals w/ Daniel Ramsey

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Virtual professionals not only grant you the time you’ve been craving, but they also improve your customer experience with processes and systems that work.

In this episode, I interview Daniel Ramsey, CEO and Co-Founder at MyOutDesk, about how virtual professionals affect customer experience.

Daniel and I discussed:

- How VAs earned a shout-out in Tim Ferris’s 4-Hour Workweek

- Setting expectations: the honeymoon metaphor

- Why the Philippines provides such exceptional virtual professionals

- When customers know they need VAs but can’t articulate it

- Strategic gates and failsafes

Check out these resources we mentioned during the podcast:

- Daniel Ramsey on LinkedIn

- MyOutDesk

- Airbnb

- Uber

Subscribe, listen, and rate/review the Customer Experience Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play or Google Podcasts, and find more episodes on our blog. Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for The Customer Experience Podcast in your favorite podcast player.

Or a lot of our virtual professionals arehired to serve in the customer, experience, role or customer service orsupport, or whatever it is, and so, when they have a process and a systemthat's fully baked into every fabric of the culture of the business we win. The single most important thing you cando today is to create and deliver a better experience for your customers,learn how sales marketing and customer success experts create internalalignment, achieve desired outcomes and exceed customer expectations in apersonal and human way. This is the customer experience podcast. Here'syour host, Ethan beaute. I wish I had more time. Is that something that youor a team member? As ever said? I wish I had more time. Of course it is time,is our most valuable resource but demands on our time only grow,especially in growing businesses. Today, we're talking through a solution tothis a way to add flexibility to your team and to help you scale. Our guestis a long time entrepreneur who started run and sold several businesses in hiscareer. More than a dozen years ago now he co founded my out desk, where heserves as CEO. Their team strengthens and scales growing companies withvirtual assistance and virtual professionals, their clients range fromthe fortune, five hundred and in five thousand to start ups in Solo Preneurs,Daniel Ramsey. Welcome to the customer experience podcast. Thank you so muchfor having me, I'm excited to be here. Yeah, we've known each other a littlebit for years. It's been a long time since I've seen you because I haven'tbeen out on the road so much so I'm looking forward to to catch it up herein this conversation- and I love this idea of bringing in flexible teammembers and there's so many customer experience implications here andemployee experience for that matter. But before we get into it, you know is,is thinking about the art of virtual assistance as kind of a normalizedpractice in business. I immediately thought of the four hour work week byTim Ferris. It was one of those books that kind of popularized the topic andit was like. Oh, that's how he's doing it, but in prapping for thisconversation, I noticed that you are mentioned it. It's not a book that I'veRead Unfamiliar With the concept. So tell me a little bit about that likehow did you get the mention? How did that work out and what did that meanfor you in the arc of normalizing virtual assistance? Yeah,it's an interesting story, in fact Tim and I got to hang out maybe four fiveyears ago he was in San Francisco speaking, and I actually just went upto him and said Tim. Let me tell you you, you have like changed my wholeworld and, prior to his book, virtual assistance were like a novelty. Youknow you'd walk by it and go that's strange. Who would ever do that andthen he wrote this book and literally, if you look at our kind of growthtrajectory of h w what our head count is, which is what we count. You know wecount how many bodies do we have place with customers and we just broke thefifteen hundred virtual professionals. We call them virtual professionals, butI just had to shake his hand because...

I'm like Tim, you did it for me, man,you were you were my guy, but he came up with a great story to tell around anindustry that I was involved in, and so I think it's great the concept of youknow. I don't know about working four hours a week, I'm I don't do that. Ilike the idea, but but the reality is this idea of a global work force,especially and ethen. This is like the time right. The labor market is tightagain, material costs are soaring, customers are calling because guesswhat e commerce and the phones are just ringing even for us we're busier thanwe've ever been right, and so I think this is a great time to have thisconversation, and I think the audience is really. I hope, we're going to bringa lot of value to them awesome. So we'll start where we always start witheverybody, no matter of their background, no matter their businesscustomer experiences, something we all have in common. I feel like it's ourgreatest differentiator when I say customer experienced you Daniel. Whatdoes it mean? I love your question and I actually was thinking about itbecause I knew this question was going to come up and I want to relate it tothe audience in the easiest terms possible when a husband and a wifedivorce- and you know, I'm a storyteller, so I'm going to tell astory right. The number one reason that they divorce is money, but nobody talksabout the number two and number two is misaligned expectations like o ahusband will go in. I thought it was going to be like this. A wife goes well.Why don't you do that? And people are misaligned about the expectation upfront and so in our business and how we serve our customers. We just get very,very hyper, clear up front in every step of the customer communication, soin our world, it's always about aligning expectations up front and thenjust delivering on the promises that we make over time, and we found that whenyou do that, they're just are a lot less issues. You know so here it is alining expectations, because that's where all the frustration lives in thecustomer experience journey absolutely really well said. I like the fullexplanation as well as the concise one, and I think it's something that weoverlook quite a bit. I think what happens more often than that whencustomers, wind up disappointed, is that expectations haven't been managedat all. Yes, they haven't been guided, they have been set up, they haven'tbeen established and therefore the customers left to make up their ownexpectation, and then it gets into communication as well. In yourexperience, I know you serve a wide variety of companies will get into thatand just a minute. But in your experience, your observation or eventhinking about your own business or other businesses that you created, doyou like customer experience more as a role or a function or a team like anamed customer experience, person or team, or do you prefer it as a mindstor a philosophy or a cultural elementar, an ethos that pervades all of the teams?Yeah Gosh? What a weird thing to ask! I understand what you're asking it in ourbusiness: it's just part of the fabric...

...of our culture is delivering on what wepromise, and so it's one thing I own the company and we have a big. It's abig push, just just just to make sure that the customers expectation is fullybaked into the very first call to the delivery five years down the road. Soin our world we, you know, we write out the expectation. We asked the customerto confirm. We don't move forward when somebody's, not ready, because theythink they have an idea but they're not sure, and they want to try it. And youknow you don't go into a relationship saying: Let's try it, let's see ifit'll work you know, and so you know when customers are like. I just want tothrow money at the problem. That's when I really get scared right, and so ourour world is just it starts in the beginning, but we hold thoseexpectations all the way through with good systems and process, and so thegood systems of processes. We just we record everything from theconversations to the initial consultation to what the jobexpectations are and we show our customers like: Hey here's, what yousaid and here's what we put into our system is that right and we want ourcustomers to do the same thing with our virtual professionals, becausetypically we're a staffing company. If you think of us, were just a globalstaffing company right, so a lot of our virtual professionals are hired toserve in the customer, experience, role or customer service or support orwhatever it is, and so when they have a process and a system that's fully bakedinto every fabric of the culture of the business. We win, we win, and so that'skind of our our perspective, love it yes, so it's definitely tending towardthe latter, and I like what you offered there in terms of you know what I heardor inferred from part of your answer. There was this idea of kind of gate,keeping like no. We are not going to go to the next step, just because you'reready to sign the contract or stroke the checker swipe the credit card. Youwe're not going to move forward until you know we we all come to agreementhere, because we've seen it too many times it's going to go sideways sobefore we go any farther, let people know more about my out desk, like who'syour ideal customer. What do you solve for them? You know what were youlooking to solve a dozen years ago and how is that manifest today? Maybe takethat anywhere that you want, but for context, because I feel like we'realready at the doorstep. I'd love to get really explicit about what is thebusiness and what are you solving sure? A I'm going to just explain my myexperience. Personally, I was a real estate developer broker mortgage personand was building a business around. You know real estate and the practice ofbuying and selling properties and land, and I actually found myself on myhoneymoon right on my honeymoon at the bar at one in the morning. My wife oftwo days was back in our bungalow and this is a Francis for COPLA resort. Soto give you some context were in trees, our room is in trees, right, there's,monkeys swinging around and we're overlooking this gorgeous lake and I'mat the bar and the bar tender starts...

...making fun of me in Spanish. Like Ispeak enough, Spanish to be dangerous right and you know dumb White Guy,these green goes don't know anything. Why is he working beautiful bride backin the room? And it was at that moment that and Ethan you mentioned it beforewe went live, but you know I just had my third child and I had a businessthat owned me versus me owning the business right, and so I immediately Ihad that epiphany moment on my honeymoon, saying Gosh I this isn'twhat I envision for my life. You know, and this isn't what I want to build,and so I came back and I went back to work and and I built systems andprocesses and we streamline who was doing what and what positions were andwhat happened to a customer once they came in and that honeymoon was apivotal point and virtual assistants were part of my world. I've been doingit since two thousand and seven before Tim Ferris's book before it becamepopular before Anybodyo even had heard of it up work wasn't around elance odesk. They didn't exist right. So literally, I had a problem that I hadto solve for my own business. I wanted to buy some of my time back, and so westarted my out desk really because I had a need and then a friend said Hey.Could you get me some? He ended up with seventeen of our virtual professionalsand you fast forward. You know we serve bio, we they called biotech, biotechyeah the OVID. You know the cove testers right. They called us a coupleo months ago and said: Hey our phones are blowing up. We need somebody toanswer the phone. They were answering them on cell phones like they had twodifferent cell phones and it's an amazing story and we're like well, youneed a phone tree and we need to rout them if they've already taken a test orthey need a test, and you know so. We worked out what they look like and thenwe gave them ten of our people to answer phones because they went fromhaving no calls to having thousands a day, and so what we do typically iswill come in. We do I a complete analysis of your business and we sitdown and say hey what positions really matter kind of like I did on my ownhoneymoon right after that moment I was like okay, something's got to changeand we'll just walk through what your org chart looks like how you're growingyour company who's on the team. Now, what do you actually need to accomplish?And we do all of that through a consultation and typically we'redelivering three to five percent profit to your bottom line by hiring a virtualassistant and basically taking your US team and having him do the highestlevel work. And so that's a long explanation. But that's how you know westarted that's a problem that I solved for my own business and then we foundout more people needed it, one more little context layer. What types ofroles are: Are these virtual professionals working in like marketingsales? You already mentioned customer service? That's definitely one likewhat are some of the roles. I think they've probably grown and expandedbeyond what someone who hasn't engaged with a virtual professional might think,which is probably like ad ten work...

...exclusively. It's like like what kindsof roles are these people being placed in yeah, so you nailed it sales, sosales development, raps ton of tech companies? You know the first point ofcontact, so many registers or download something are people, I'm a big fan ofcalling people like this is a weird thing, because you know a lot of mytech, buddies and customers they're like well. We don't want to call themuntil they're ready to buy and I'm like. No, no, no, you call them when theyraise their hand and so a lot of sales development, a lot of marketingassistance, so think of design coordination. You know all of themoving parts that have to happen. Even this podcast there's going to be aBazilli n things that have to happen after our conversation right. Well,every single thing other than this conversation with you and I ethenshould be done by by somebody. In my experience, that is a just a lower costof hourly rate, and so you got sales marketing operations. So AdministrativeWork, you know book a flight manage my calendar book a you know, like all ofthe operational you know, do a report for the company. It's very interesting.A lot of sea level. People, people who are in charge of hundreds of people donot have assistance and I always find that crazy. I'm like wait a minute,wait, a minute, your. How big is your company and you don't have an assistant?Let's go an so let's you know, so we do a lot of personal assistance andadministry of assistance, and you know customer support and service. That's ahuge place that we serve. You know there's a lot of a lot of the times andit's interesting because I want to talk about how we help the customer serviceand support people, but a lot of the times. Customers just want a phone liketo have a conversation like just pick up the call and let let him know thatyou know, and somebody on the other line is answering and telling you whatthe time frame is and how long it's going to Wai. You know like those aresimple things, so those are kind of letting you vent out loud empathy.Empathy goes a long way in the customer support you know space. So those arethe four areas: Sales, marketing, Adman and customer service and support cool.I'm curious how you think about this because I'm sure different people thinkabout it differently, but for you and your organization, one of your obviouscustomers is people who need this flexibility. They need the extrasupport they may maybe want to reduce Labor coster, a variety of reasons theymight engage in your ovid situation. Hopefully you don't need those peoplefor very long. It's just. We have this acute need, let's solve in a flexibleway and then move on and go back to our nor normal staffing level. So that'sone customer, the other customer or are the employees or are they part of thesupply chain? Are they partners like? How do you think about the virtualprofessionals themselves like? How do you view them in the context of YourBusiness? Well, in our business, we call him part of the MOD family. I meanwe're very family oriented company. We give our virtual professionals healthcare vacation. They have access to loan programs. I mean it's a job for them O,so we on board them. I mean. There's...

...some crazy stuff: our people areprimarily in the Philippines and there's some crazy things that theyhave to go through. We get an FI gray background check. We have a SASSplatform that tracks like where they go, what they do and like we just know whatthey're up to and that's part of, our accountability to our customers and ourvirtual professionals. We want to set them up for success, which again wegoes back to a lining expectations at the beginning of the conversation, andso we also are in a process where we match our customers. So when somebodycomes like ethen says: Hey, I need X. Well, we don't go out and get a band c.We drill down on your expectations and then we find somebody that actually hasexperience in that and has done it before so we're a long term staffingcompany. We don't do project based stuff, that's a a great model for fiveror up work, there's a lot of people who do project based stuff, but weliterally are a full time: talent, staffing, solution for growing andscaling businesses. That's where I mean, and it's instant talent, that's theother thing that I love about it you come in tomorrow and we will set you upif you're ready will help, you make sure you are ready, but we'll set youup and then next week, you're interviewing in the week after they'rein your office versus the normal staffing world, where my in today'smarket, I'm hearing three and six months to hire locally. So it's crazyright now, yeah so go a little bit deeper into something that you went bythere. So I, like the already address this kind of much more long term thanproject based. What does that mean is this? Is someone going in for twelvemonths or they going in for thirty six months or they going in for eightmonths like, and I know it varies, yeah like speak to that a little bit andthen, where I really want to go with this question, is to follow up to thatso I'll preview, it here or you just take it all straight away. You alreadymentioned a little bit about on boarding. This is one of my personalcuriosities. It's important for you to on board so feel free to speak to that,because you're on boarding them into this, my out desk ecosystem, where theymight over the next five years, beyond two projects or four projects orwhatever, but then also, how do you work with your customers to make surethat they're properly on boarding them into that unique experience right, so the moving pieces? There are wellyou're going to invest less than that on boarding if it's a six month,engagement than a thirty six month, engagement so anyway, there speak tothat. However, you wish yeah. I love it. It's a good question because that in ahuman world which that's the world that we live in, like we're not sellingsoftware we're not selling a widget. So I like to say our people, people aremessy right. We've had some amazing stories, one of our virtualprofessionals o you like this story, she's pregnant she's, finishing hershift, she's delivering for a customer and wildly enough she starts going intoLabor right and being a new father. Like you know, last month, I still findthis story crazy. So she goes in the...

...labor she finishes her day gets in acab, goes to the hospital and doesn't make it like. She has her fourth babyin the cab because she was finishing for a client it right, and so what wedo is we talk to our customers. We verify that they have a system in aprocess that they have a framework, and I want to talk a little bit aboutframeworks because I think a lot of people in the customer service worldthey haven't fully baked what their framework is. There's a lot of tribalknowledge. There one thing about virtual assistance: once you havesomebody not in your office, like we've all just experienced with Ovid, youhave to then create more systems and process. You have to document what youdo and when you do that that raises the bar and everybody kind of in the on theteam realizes who this is the new standard. This is a new minimumstandard which is great. So what we we do with our clients is just make surethey have the right processing systems in place. They have technologysupporting the roles. We literally are like okay, so they're going to makecalls for you or they're going to accept calls for you. What are theysupposed to say and well people don't know we work with them to figure thatout and if they do know, that's the basic step. Then there's the next level,which is you know they have call review where they're actually scoringindividual and providing feedback. Then they're doing some sort of core valuefor that group. Quarterly assessment, where the employee is like gettingfeedback, so they know what the work is that they need to do, and so we serve avariety of people, people brand new startups who are growing and they justgot. You know seed money and there they're growing to you know one of ourcustomers is a multi billion dollar company and so everybody's in adifferent path and are our job is to support them and give them the toolsthat they need or say no you're, not ready, and that goes back to theexpectation thing. It's really interesting. It's a nice value. Add tothese organizations as well. I feel, like you, obviously have plenty of anyou've said it several times: structure, processs yea. So in the framework talkabout frameworks, what is what do you mean by that word and how does itbenefit? Everybody involved another story because I'm a crazy guy, I'm I'mback in two thousand and four I'm I launched this Development Real EstateCompany and I've got sales people and I'm and I'm like hey. What do you saywhen you're talking to a customer and guy gets off? He said he says something,and I asked another guy like what are you saying and I realized I had a wayof saying it and everybody else in the room said it differently and I was likeholy moly. We need a framework like they need to learn from me who I ownthe company. At the time I had the most successful completed. You knowtransactions and these you know, and their experience ranged like there wassomebody who had more than me and somebody who was brand new and Irealized no one was on the same page right, it's all. Okay, we need aframework. We need a framework, and you know in real estate there's there's anexample. L P Mama is a great one...

...location price motivation, appointmentmortgage and you know, are you working with another agent, so if you're a realestate broker and your prospecting, you know exactly like the five questions toask. You know location, why are you buying in that neighborhood right andso that's an example of a framework. That's super super easy, and so one ofour our frameworks actually starts with hey. Who Do we need to think for thefact that we're on this call today we're building report with ourcustomers like hey? How did you hear about us who do we need to think right,so we're planting into their brain and, if you're, listening in your customer,you know you got ask this question, because every single person asks thisexact same question. Who Do we need to think and what would make our timetogether, amazing for you? So our focus is on the customer right, and so wewant to help our when they on board for the customer, support and experiencekind of positions. We want to make sure there is a framework there's propertraining on it, there's a mechanism for measurement right. So there you know,if you need to score the car calls and then you have to provide feedback andlet him grow. Let them grow into the world as they're learning the business.So that's a great example of a framework that we use, but ourcustomers very. We have e commerce, technology companies, insurancecompanies real estate. So it's really cool to see all these differentversions of frameworks, but it's for sure a big deal, especially in thecustomer experience world awesome. So this is obviously come a long way,you're placing a wider variety of talent I would get. Then you were fiveor ten years ago, you're placing it at a wider variety of organizations.Although the theme of course, is growth and scale. What are people still likeconfused about or misled about in terms of hiring virtual professionals likewhat are some of the common objections or concerns and I'm sure you're goingto voice some things that someone listening is thinking right now, yeahyeah, but you know so it's come a long way, but it's still not fully normaland in a lot of corners, and so I love you free to like throw some light intothat corner yeah for sure I mean, first of all, if you're listening right nowthey are smart, just as smart as you and I right, and they have experiencetypically, especially for the customer service world. The Philippines is thenumber one voice country in the world. Now more fortune, five hundred and moreinternational. You know the top one thousand, that's the country that allof their customer services kind of going out, one company wells, Fargoheld out like funny enough. Whilst far go, the bank had no customer experience,people in the Philippines and then they purchased another bank that had anentire center there ten years ago. So it's becoming the norm. Not only dothey, you know, are they smart, but they have great experience. English isa first language there, so, when you're driving on the streets you're like Ohthere's, the directions to the place you're trying to go to and it's inEnglish, I can read it their values. That's the other thing that we love thevalues are similar to ours. Ninety four...

...percent of the people in thePhilippines are Catholic or identify Catholic, and so their value system forSouth East Asia alines with ours perfectly where other countries thatare also low cost they have different sets of their culture, is different, sothey're, right and wrong is different, not wrong, but just different right,and so those are just some of the things. What I can tell you, manypeople are like they know they have a need, but they're not quite sure whator how and they can't articulate it. Those folks, I just invite them. Youknow to come, do a consultation with us and we'll tell you what's possible andnot possible. I have a good friend WHO's. A doctor, brilliant guy calls meup and says Daniel. I need help, but I have no idea what I need help with I'mlike okay, how many offices do you own again he's like fifteen? I'm like? Oh,my goodness, you know so it's normal not to know what next stepsare. We all hit our LID right, and in that moment I ve just encouraged youguys to reach out, and we could help you through. What mightbe next cool talk about this I feel like when people feel like they needmore time back where they need more system or process. I think what a lotof people are doing is looking to automation and assuming that at somepoint, if they have good enough data, they can lay or some machine learningor artificial intelligence on it. Do you find you know, and I hatepitting it this way I mean my feeling is as a customer. In most cases, Iwould most often prefer to deal with the human being someone that is goingto get the nuance. Get the subtlety understand my language not make meexplain it. Two or three times like my default is to human and perhaps to avirtual professional. You have any thoughts about the relationship betweenhumans and automation, kind of, in the context of where our conversation hasbeen yeah. It's interesting one of my one of our customers, who happens torun a really large mortgage company, one of the top. It's a one of the topfive in the country. He woke up at four a M to hundreds of text messagesbecause they're CR M and there was a booboo. I love saying Bobo. You knowbecause I got a little little kids right, but there was a booboo and theautomation sent an automated text at four in the morning to his entiredatabase across his entire country and tracs the entire country. So he woke upto hundreds of you know: Hey Fu for Texina me in the morning. Well, I gotfour in the morning right yeah, and so that's not a good experience right, butback to your question, I'm not a Mecca Guy Right. I don't think ai is going totake A. I don't think we're there yet they're not going to take over theworld we're not going to have flying cars in the next five years. No matterwhat Elan must says, you know when I'm not and my kids aren't going to live onMars, like that. Just none of that's going to happen. You know, but what Ido believe in is good old fashioned.

Pick up the phone. Give you an example.Last year, R H BAC had a little curfuffle. You know like there was inCalifornia, it's hot. So when that happens, you're like okay call rightaway, so we called four different companies. One Company got back and ittook forty eight hours, and so you know that's a small business. You know mindset, but I can tell you we have a bunch of you know: Air Ban, B and hotels andrental customers, and we call the low company and said Hey we're thinkingabout buying all these blocks across all of these doors. Nobody got back tous and it's a big company. I mean it's a big company, you know so whetheryou're, small or big. My preferences go to the conversation, that's where allthe money is. That's where all the relationship is that's where you canset expectations and really aline outcomes for not only customer but alsothe company, and so I hate it man, I hate email. I don't like text, peopletext me, I'm like hey. What's up you know, and so I've in our company we'vebuilt that in like we call you back wildly enough in the real estate worldlike back in the day, and I ramble so watch out. One of our valuepropositions was. We would just call you back try to mask a differentiatoryeah like normal business. We will respondto your emails and call you back. We promise like and all of a sudden wewere. We were very busy so yeah, I'm a big Fan of just picking up the phoneand having conversations- and I think that's where all the gold is. I thinkthat's where you learn, I think, as a CEO, I still talk to the customers. Istill when there's a problem. I still get on the and I don't have to. We havea huge team. Like I want to so, I understand, what's going on in thereand there for them for their experience, I want to know what should I change,because I get to change anything right so if they, if they're having a badexperience, I want to know why I want to know why and how I can improve itand wildly enough. That's where all the gold is yeah, it's fantastic. Itreminds me of conversation I just had with another guest John Belize who,like you, is a multiple time company founder and he said in the company isin now that actually was describing a company built ran for ten years beforeselling it. He dedicated twenty percent of his time just to getting on thephone with customer. For All the reasons you already identified, youknow my quick take on the answer on my answer to that question that I askedyou is that the answer is obviously somewhere both end. We need both it's amatter of finding the rig balance and the thing that we miss when we overautomate is- and you use this word earlier s, empathy, people feeling seenand hurt and appreciated people being able to vent, which was a something Itossed out, but this just so much good stuff, and I like the way that youbuttoned it up to I mean the conversation is the foundation for therelationship and it can happen in multiple channels, but you know thatlive back and forth with tone and clarity is very helpful and oftenoverlook, hey if you are listening to this episode and you've enjoyed it andyou're listening now. So I obviously you have I've got to more than I knowyou would enjoy and they're both much...

...earlier by the way. This is going to besomething like episode, a hundred and forty three, and thank you again forjoining me for Daniel Way. Back on episode, Fourteen with Samantha Stone,founder and C Mo of the Marketing Advisory Network, we talked aboutbalancing automation, AI and human relationships. So a lot of this, wherewe ended up here, is what we spent a lot of time on back on episode,fourteen with Samantha Stone and then a little bit later episode, forty onewith Nelson Bruton, who is the president at interchanges. We calledthat setting up your life chat to dramatically accelerate sales and thetheme there is where you ended. There was. Is this conversation right, and sowe can turn our chats into chat bots, but I feel like a there are spots whereit needs to be turned over to a human and, be you don't know how to set upthe BOT until you do all the hard learning of being in real conversationswith real people. That's how you decide. What are the frequently asked questions?What answers do tend to satisfy people the first time et Cetera, so that was aepisode s fourteen and forty one with Samantha Stone and Nelson Brute anrespectively Daniel before I let you go I'd love for you to do two things forme and everyone listening. The first is to thank or mention someone who's had apositive impact on your life or your career, and the second is to give a nodor a shout out to accompany your brand that you appreciate for the experiencethat they deliver for you as a customer yeah, that's Great. My favorite mentorstory is as a business owner. I was new and I was a young hustler right so started a business from scratch. Grewit got the opportunity to sell multiple businesses and the reality is. I alwayshad an opportunity to learn from somebody and my first teacher. My firstmentor was a coach who I actually paid and wildly enough I've found everysingle time. I hit a ceiling, I'm one mentor away from breaking through that,and typically it's somebody who's done it before been there before and reallyhas a hard good skill set about solving thatissue, and so every time with in our company- and that was just the firsttime- I've just seeked out people who can add value and we can reciprocate.That would be my mentor always find coaches mentors in your world. Yoursecond question: What was it again, a company or a brand that that gives youa great experience, yeah, it's good, it's interesting, I'm a big fan ofArbab Arban, B and Uber, and these brands that deliver stuff to you andmake it seamless and to a point, although I said the conversations aregold, I also really appreciate smart tech fat and we use it ourselves right,so the smart tech that just gives me what I want when I want it, that's theworld. That's where we're going right. I don't know that we're there yet, butthese companies are really innovated that through and I love ordering Saladsand having them delivered to. I mean like yes, I'll pay four dollars to havethat delivered to my office and not...

...have to go anywhere absolutely so.Those are my fantastic yeah yeah my family and I have been using Arbab alot and even during the pandemic, just because it's a bit, it feels moreintimate and controlled awesome, great recommendations. There totally agreewith you and for folks who are with us here, have the conclusion of theconversation: they've obviously enjoyed it. They might want to take a next step.They might want to connect with you or learn more about my out desk were someplaces. You would send people to follow up on this yeah if you're listeningright now, I'd just invite you to the website my outdo and grab aconsultation. One of the things we add a tremendous amount of value up front,so our consultations are free. We will go through your org chart. Your Systemsand process understand your frame, works and figure out. If you actuallycould use our service and if not we'll, actually tell you we're like hey, Idon't think I don't think we're a fit. You know there's some biotech companiesout there that are very technical and there's some customers that they reallyneed high level technical expertise and we just aren't a fit for that. We willtell you: If we're not a fit, we will tell you if you are a fit, we will hope,develop your frameworks and your guides and everything you need to do to hirevirtual professionals and if you come in, we actually, I actually wrote abook last year about scaling a company with virtual professionals. So not onlywill we do the consultation for free, but we'll give you a copy of our bookwhere it'll give you a written guide to how to do this, the right way becausebelieve it or not, you can. You can screw up virtual assistance, reallyeasy awesome, a two things that, just from from a customer experiencestandpoint two things I absolutely loved about this conversation. One isthis idea of all of the up front investment, true discovery andpartnership to figure out of a you told a story earlier of I need help. I haveno idea what I need. I just need help I mean, and the way you close this downkind of button that up for me and the thing that'll stick with me for a longtime. Is this idea of setting up gates along the waste that you do not allowyour a customers or your virtual professionals to fail like you cannotproceed to the next step? Until we come to some agreement, understanding youcheck the box, you truly get it or you're, fully prepared or we'veanswered that question or whatever, really really good stuff. I appreciateyour time and your insights. I wish you continued success, Daniel andappreciate everyone for listening to yeah. Thanks for having me then- andthis has been fantastic, clear, communication, human connection, higherconversion- these are just some of the benefits of adding video to themessages your sending every day. It's easy to. Do it just a little guidanceto pick up the official book, Rehumanize Your Business, how personalvideos, accelerate sales and improve customer experience learn more in ordertoday, at bombance book, that's B, O M B Bomb Com fuck thanks for listening tothe customer experience. podcast remember the single most importantthing you can do today is to create and...

...deliver a better experience for yourcustomers, continue learning the latest strategies and tactics by subscribingright now in your favorite podcast player, or visit Bom Bombo podcast t t.

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