The Customer Experience Podcast
The Customer Experience Podcast

Episode 118 · 10 months ago

118. The 3 C’s That Make or Break the SDR Experience w/ Ernest Owusu

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Imagine you’re a new SDR, and your manager tells you to ‘Shut up and dial!’ The experience for the person on the other end of the line is going to be less than exceptional, don’t you think?

In order to land promising meetings, we’ve got to stop measuring success by volume.

In this episode, Ernest Owusu — retired NFL athlete turned Sales Development Leader at 6sense — talks to me about…

- Why volume shouldn’t define an SDR’s success

- 4 sales development tactics that aren’t going anywhere

- Best practices for hiring and onboarding SDRs

- The 3 C’s that SDRs need to offer exceptional CX

Follow Ernest on LinkedIn or Twitter @theernestowusu.

Subscribe, listen, and rate/review the Customer Experience Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play or Google Podcasts, and find more episodes on our blog.

So it's no forms no span, no col cost.We only go after companies that are actually interested in our product and,I think fudimentally a lot of us as buyers and sellers can appreciate that,because it only makes sense to have a conversation with someone that actuallywould want to talk to you and Olsol buy atr product. It just fundamentaly makesense. The single most important thing you cando today is to create and deliver a better experience for your customers,learn how sales marketing and customer success experts create internalalignment, achieve desired outcomes and exceed customer expectations in apersonal and human way. This is the customer experience podcast. Here'syour host, eetan Baute, Hey! If you've been listening to the customerexperience podcast, you know that we open each episode, Withan Intro, that Iresearch write and read, but today's guest has an about section on Linkedin.That really says it best. So I'll read that leveraging my experience as an NFLathlete turn sales development leader. I do three things: One teachsellerspotent prospecting, tactics that generate meetings to educate sales andmarketing leaders on the specific areas of focus for leading sales, development,orgs and three advise executives on what they must do to build and scale aworld class sales development team. So we're obviously talking salesdevelopment in this episode. The early stages of the customer experience someof the earliest impressions and relationships that our customers havewith our team members and our guests spent nearly four years at Persado asthe sales development, rep manager and director, as well as an accountexecutive. Today he serves as the senior director of sales development atSixk sente an account engagement platform, perhaps best known for itsability to surface by your intent for your sales and marketing teams and ifyou're still wondering about the NFL athlete part of his linked in aboutsection he played for both the Minnesota Vikings and the Tampa Babuccaneers and played professionally in Canada and Autralia all as adefensiveend ernest to USU. Welcome to the customer experience, podcast YeahVagas Os are having me appreciate it yeah I'll spare you and listeners fromtoo many sports analogies, but is there anything about football in general orthe defensive end position in particular, that's been useful to youin your career in sales and sales development yeah most definitely, Ithink, with with SDRBR teams, especially right now with how crazy theworld is with Covid, I've learned a lot around the importan of a strong culture.It definitely wouldn't say that if I didn't have that eou experience, Iwould have able to do that and that culture building aspect that brought toa team has helped is weather almost any storm. We've had not only just that beat a point where you know survived withmorsool thriving, so that'sprobably the strongest thing I learned from my fokrer cool culture isdefinitely going to come up later. In our conversation and just another quickobservation, I want to make and see if you have anything to share on that,obviously that about section one of the reasons I liked it so much was that it,the structure of it, is clear and simple, and even more so I appreciatehow it promotes alignment from the C suite to the front lines. You spoke tokind of three layers of the organization. There obviously wasintentional, but you want to share anything else about that yeah you'reexactly right. I was intentional, and it's interesting too, because you knowit SR team, you don't you do have to have that cross, departmental alignmentbetween sales marketing. You know INUSA cantuvers as well as executives,because a lot of people you know theydidn'tmake, there's a lot to learnabout how to run INFECTIV, VDRSDR team and there's a lot that people justdon't know, but it's really important for all three layers that have a strongether saying of that, so the team could drive awesome. So I'm looking forward ogetting into that too. But we'll start where we always start earnest willstart with customer experience. When I say that does it mean anything Iparticular to you yeah most. Definitely, I will say especially is someone who will say you know if you don't do wellon the SDRBDR frying, a lot of people...

...feel like you, don't leave the bestcustomer experience, but you know to me: customer experience is more or less ofthe product of how you make your customers feel before during and afterthey buy your product. So it's definitely something that that rainsvery supperting for me, and you know, Srb Ar teams have a lot to do with theoverall customer experience. Whether or not you know so actually does buy yourproducts. So it's really important for us to take a pesiteration awesome. Welldone, and- and I agree it does- There's a so much that happens at that stage.You know, like we've, maybe done some of our research and now we're finallyengaging with another human being representing this brand, representingthe opportunity and in a lot of ways, managing expectations and son rightthere with you for people who aren't familiar, tell us a little bit aboutsix cents like who's, your ideal customer, and what do you solve forthem? Yeah sure, so sixes is basically an account based orchestration platformthat help sales and mark an team identify which companies want to senticby their product. Once you're able to help you find that Wen ce prior torspriatizeas accounts and ultimately engage Wi in a way, that's most meainfor the for them and again, especially going off a custom experience. Webasically tell people, you know what they want to hear base upon what kindof digit footprint they're sending US yeah go a little bit deeper to thatlike so so so some of the words and phrases I associate it with it are, youknow, intent and intent data being in market right, so so for folks that arelistening and correct me where I'm wrong here. So folks, woare listening,you know so many of us are putting together these these target lists basedon kind of generalized criteria. But what six sense is doing is saying: Well,you may have your list and that's cool and you might use them, but here's alist of people that are actually in market for your product, based on theway that they're behaving online so maybe stitch that together a little bitmore yeah most definitely, and we actually have a really interestingmantra over here where we say no forms. No Spam, no col calls. So the realityis like my team is definitely calling people, but by no means is it cold,because we only want to go after people that are actually in market to by ourproduct. So there are a lot of different reasons as to why that mighthappen, whether the companyis doing research or ther poking on tyourwebsite or doing all this kind of digital activity. That's usually mostclosely aligned to some of your current customers. That's our sweet spot! Wewant to make sure that my team is only going after those first and foremostbecause to make sure that there is a strong customer experience, it onlymakes sense for to talk to o actually want to buy from us. It totally does Imean there's so much activity that annoys us, I'm sure, you're on thereceiving end of a lot of outraks wer. Like I don't represent that part of theorganization, I would never be a decision maker in that process, I'm noteven an influence or over these this product category. I get so muchoutreached that way, and so I would love for you to say that Montra onemore time, because I think it would really make a lot of people who wouldlisten to the show excited yeah. Definitely so it's no forms. No Spam,no col cost. We only go after companies that are actually interested in ourproducts and I think fundamentally, a lot of us as buyers and sellers canappreciate that, because it only makes sense to have a conversation withsomeone that actually would want to talk to you and alsomae by tar product.It just fundamentally make sense totally it's so good that someone'stackling that problem again for both sides of the for both people on bothsides of an opportunity. So let's talk sales development in general and SDRrole in particular, especially for people who aren't familiar with thedaytoday in these seats and in these teams. I guess well, let's start withyour definition or a guiding philosophy of that role like what is how does itfit into what we're doing as organ drations and it's interesting as Imentioned earlier, you know we talked about hi three layers between you,indivisal contributors, mangers and executives, a lot of people,fundamentsale kind of struggle with what the role actually doesn'td, how todo it well at its core. The most important thing I remember is: SRB Rteams are providing value to people if you're doing it right. Your jobs focusis making sure that you have a strong understanding of a company what theycare about, how to line your product and Beng able to provide value to them.So you know when you think about...

...traditional SDRBR TS, people. Think ofjust like hammering the phone and then batchand blast emails and annoyinglinkedon messages, and yes, that that is a way to reach out to someone. Butthe reality is you know when you think of high functioning sdrbr teams, it'sthe teams that use those mediums to Ultimatel, give something that's goingto help someone do their job better. That's that's the Montor that we moreso focused on in we've noticed that when you have a strong ability to notreally focus on that, but find different avenues to pursue that,whether it's through intenddata or having a strong understanding ofcertain personos and why they want to buy your products. I cannot whenly makea team highly functioning, but also kind of set the Stetur for how otherVedar team should be across the industry. Yeah I have a Yau just gaveme a glimpse into like a really promising future, where people are moresatisfied in their work and they're, engaging with people in ways thatsatisfy them more as well. So you came in as a director your senior directortoday on the way in the door. What were a couple things that you kind of lookedat or evaluated to say, oh good, this is on tracker, or this is anopportunity to you know: Do things a little bit better? What were a couplethings you did kind of on the way in that are fruitful for you today, yeahsure. So you know whatever Tok you look at an Srbar, so there are lot ofdifferent abumues to pursue. I probably say the most important to kind of takea look at is on your process, but also you know not not to mention themessaging. So when I first came on to six cents, that was probably thebiggest thing that I focused on again going back to now how you're treaing,AC customers and eventual customer tol say you want to make sure that you'regiving them something. So the first thing t a I focused it on was like whatare we saying to our customers Luke? Why are the what gets them to take like?What's the main reason why they should buy six sense? And how can I lie that,to you know our content? We have in our website to what our team is creating towhat gets people to help and help themself effectively, and that's thebiggest thing that I focused on a e, a lot of resources out there from Touself lofe through outreach of like how to structure these messages throughdifferent Cha different channels. But if you do it right and you're focusedacross the board and is giving your prospects and giving your bench ofcustomers, but iu can see a lot of good chains and some good results out ofthat now. I also heard in your response the obvious call for sales andmarketing alignment, which we won't spend a lot of time on, because it's ayou know it's one of those was one of those topics everyone likes to talkabout because it's necessary, but I think it's better done than talkedabout. An hat sounds like just even that process of that evaluation begsfor it. So again, generally for the ignorant among us. What does success? Look like in therole besides the obvious, like book meetings, a appointments booked, anappointments held like what are what are some, whether it's metrics or whether it'skind of other outcomes related to the process of engaging buyers and bringingthem along and serving them. What a success look like in the role, yeah,sure and again it's not as simple as just meetings you know like you, dohave to make sure that they're going ato, the right accounts, they're goingafter counsin ovation, newterns opportunities, and there are a lot ofdifferent mesuries that we take a look at a e term. That overall volume andone thing weave, really try an pay attention to is. Yes. Volume is goodbecause it's a good edihator of where you're going to go, but it shouldn'tnecessarily to find you and if you create numbers to define whether or notI'm sorry numbers in terms fbout activity in terms of whether or notsomehin is successful, then that's Woyo create a cultural people's. Pushing outcontent, pushing out calls just for Thay Oe, hitting a number and they'renot focusing their buyers. So we try and create n environment where we'retracking see like basically baselines around what it means to be successfulwithin the role, how many meetings can be generated, as well as how manymanies can be turned to qualified opportunities, because it's not enoughto just have a conversation with someone, because you want to you wantto talk about your brand and what you're doing to really make sure thatthese are people that actually want to talk to you and theyre actually wantedto even baforyour product Kay. I appreciate the stab there as somethingI call activity. Worship and you know it's just like it's like flippingthings around a little bit. I mean therre tools. There means to endsrather than ends in in themselves, and so it always appreciates someone whokind of takes a moment to kind of punch...

...that down a little bit. One aspect ofyour about that I didn't read. You listed some of the channels that youhelp sellers connect and communicate through just give a rundown on those.What are what are some of the preferred channels? how Ar maybe they trending toyour observation? You've been obviously in you know, in the space for severalyears and I'm sure some things are trending up and trending down.Specifically, of course, I'm interested in video so share whatever you O,whatever you like about the different kind of modes of connecting andcommunicating yeah sure it. You know, sales ofvelment is really interestingbecause, like the way it is right now is going to be completely different.Six months, rnown n six months for then so you do have to be very much in theknow of how things are developing now. There's some cores that tend to workreally well and, like, I think, they're kind of trying tro not reallygoangwhere iten soon, one. Obviously everyone doesn't eknail. I think you,but it is important more than anything not to just do one channel have a truemulti channel Trivyou, so email is still really affective. One thing thatpeopleil kind of shy away from, but I think it's not because it's ineffectivewith more so people, because they just don't Wanto, actually Doo it. It'scalling calling is still super powerful. Even if you don't actually get aconversation with someone, it is a way to at least like leave a voicemeil andthen kind of have some kind of grand familiarity. Social is the one thatI'll say is definitely on the rise, as of lately I' say. Social has gave evenmore probless because of covid. You know the fact that everyone's at hometrying to find different ways to to connect ti H, eah other overall Lininactivity as increased just because of how this Rimenis are now and to yourpoint. Video is still very powerful and we have very specific ways that wetrack video and to make sure whether or not's, effective and kind of how we'reable to convert them. Anto opportunities, and it's somethingthat's only going to Continu O get better because people r starting torealize more and more every day that like it, is an awesome way to add yourstragin yogeter, an more opportunities awesome. I one of the things I likedthat you raised about the phone there is, I feel, like it's kind of likedirect mal, was for a different reason. Like you know, everyone was doing itand then people pulled back from it because Teroi was not as obvious, andso now it's like. Oh there's, just more capacity for it for receiving this, andI think to your point, a lot of humans, don't like picking up the phone Iwasjust talking with a Gal who Jo joined our marketing team from the BDRposition inside our company, and one thing she shared with me- is that andis Si'm curious to know if you've experimented with this yourself or yourteam members have is often times on voicemails. She wouldn't even leave hernumber. She would just use it as this opportunity to communicate something inparticular and then reference an other touchpoint, whether it was a personalvideo that she had sent by email or by linke din or some other touchpoint, andso it's like you know she was. It was interesting to me again as someone youknow fully a step outside this kind of role in the details of it to hear theidea of using the phone not to generate a call back, but instead to kind ofconnect it to the other pieces. Exactly and that's that's more less a person wetake because Yo know the reality is: If you call a hundred people, you mightcatch three to four, maybe five maximum with a live conversation, but you havethe opportunity of all those voice bells and, if you eve an effectivevoicemell, those people go in your Linton page e. go and look at youremails overlook your videos. So we take the voice motes away to kind of makesure that in the realities, because you know different prospects, respond, Touhdifferent abumues. So if you leave a voice mal, that person might just bethe person who doesn't respond, the thougt that's jus kind of who they are,but if they get that voice mold and whatever avnue they care more about ortheyr most mos recently going towards. They will see your message. It's a goodway for them to kind of be reminded to reach back out to you love. It areagain for the ignorant here me and Saatles, some of our listeners. Youknow it's really obviously really important to identify the channel thatpeople you're connecting communicating with prefer. Is there anything going onin the back end in any of the systems that you're using that help? Your teammembers know you know this guy or this Gal has not engaged in these in thesechannels. They happen to respond in...

...this other one focus with this personfocus on this channel, or is it something that you're really leavingfrom a strategy position and identit identification position to eachindividual to figure out for her himself yeah? So I do think it's reallyimportant to kind of leave it to the individual figure out, but the biggestthing that we're focused on is the engageent behind it. So if you'rereaching out a so on o bea linked in and you can see they red your messageor Theyr vising your profile, an there's, a pretty good chance thatperson Livs an linked in you soul, keep going down that channel if you're,seeing that you're leaving so on a voice, melt and they're. You know goingback and open your emails Afttoug at the voice mill then just keep hangingon the phone, because if you chance, you might be able to get them throughthe same thing with someone who fo thethe, email or through video they're,always viewing your videos, they will respond, just keep pushing forward,making sure you're abviously providing values to them. So it's not just somekind of reredunnant stile message, but who tend to look at the at theengagement as a way of whether or not like. I keep pushing this channelbecause they're at least engaging with some of the content. There's a prettyhigh likelihood that they' responded in a given period of time sure. So a lotof people see this is kind of an entry level role and it is in a lot of cases.What are a couple qualities you look for in someone and maybe what tipsmight you offer for people? This would apply, certainly beyond the BDRSDR rule,as so many people are hiring new team members at positions of all levels andthey're doing it virtually you don't get that kind of benefit of being. Youknow, side by side and kind of like the Camaraderie and some of like theculture build up and stuff and we'll get into culture in a minute, but anytips for hiring new team members, in particular hiring an onboarding andtraining and ramping. You know when you can't spend time physically together,yeah sure, so I will say probably the most, the two most important things. Arunning effective SRBDR team is effectively recruiting, as well as onboarding like if you, if you can hit a home, run with those two things andyour job is so easy. That being said, in terms of he, the person that youwant to bring on board so- and this is actually pulled from one of the saleslaters that sells off- which we kind of baked into our process. You want tofind people that are naturally curious, curious people are always asking whythey're WAC trying to figure out like different ways to hack the system andaxcodize learning we're always looking for. Go that just natural grit. Youknow sales can be a challenging job when the person thit's going to keeppushing forward is really important. You do want to make sure that we haveit's called general mental ability and the way I basically kind of coin thatis. Can I hire someone who can connect the dots between this piece ofpersonalized information, the company's value proper, make it relevant to ourproduct and from what I've seen in the past from you know, bediar teams, ethatIAVE run. That is probably the most challenging thing to tryind to sessthroughout enervy process. But if you can do it really? Well then, you'regoing to hire people, it's relative, easy to figure out IW's, going to workreally hard, who's, naturally curious, who as a growth mindset as in theircoachable, but that that general mental ability is a tricky one. But if you cankind of pull up those other three or four strong qualities and really do agood job. Assessing for the gentlementsal ability, you're cang tohire some really strong people and en terms of the onboarding, the mostimportant thing that I think with that is the industry specific information. Alot of people tend to lead with like overall prochnology, which is great asan SDRBDR wbut. The reality is like I'm not going to give full fledch two hourdemos. I just know more or less of what my customers painpoints are by PORSONAand why I should buy our product and I conommunicate to them via phone V,email video. Whatever may be so we tend to focus a lot on like understaynin theindustry, the basic fundamentals around each Channe on how how to do our bestpractices and they kind of let he the rest for the rest. Peak Er itself, butalso one thing to and you'd mention this is we also Bakin culture into ouron board, because this is something I learne specifically from my time as apersonal athlete you have to like not only bake it in, but constantlyreenforce it to make sure that when things are not going well or wher,things are going well. People know why it's going that way and your culture isalways a definition behind that really good, so wwe'll get deeper into thathere. So we get into your three ces and...

I guess just to keep people superengaged, as I do an overly long set up here, probably career culture andcompensation, so creating alignment between those and so and how we'll gethere is you were mentioning a really great built in article that was titled.Sales leaders are setting SDRs up for failure, data dat they shouldn't. Idon't know that we needed the dobt that dat part totally Drue, I would't Dou,and it started with a great quote from Nicki Ivy, which was you know, Thee.There are times when n SDR is made to feel like they're being told to shut upand dial, which is an intre, an interesting reference to think a LebronJames Scenario, where they're trying to just you know, get people to hey, stopstop talking about your whole life. Sto, stop talking about being a real wholeperson. Stop talking about things you care about just do the activity. Italso refers to SDR as one of textmost misunderstood in grueling entry levelroles and, of course it highlights your threcs career culture and compensation,which is why I reached out in the first place, thankso good for joining me. So,let's start with misunderstood and gruing. I don't know if you rememberthat line, but would you agree with that? Most definitely. You know it'sfunny that you know the Scrba role is an EDTR level role. It is like it's thefirst step into whatever your carrer path. Bate might be in a lot ofdifferent tech companies, but the reality is with how it's developed overperiod time and how it's evolved like it is not an entury leval role like theLevelo sophistication that you need to get meetings with fortune. One hundredcompanies with the CE, like the people in your company needs to have aconversation with is getting even more difficult because the market is sosaturate F with different strbr teams than only the strong who have a keenability to really understand persoonus understanding, panpoints, even at timesdigging into tenks and Google News and all these different resources in waysalmost set like working as many consultants. Yes, it is an entry levelrole, but the work that you're doing is not an TU level and the reality is yes,part of being an Scrbdr is growing at times. You know, because you arecalling people and sometimes people, just they love just take out theiraggression on srsbdrs. You see it all. The time of linked in soone gets a bademail from someone and they just take us an opportunity to shout out andSDRBDR who was just trying to do his herd job. They maybe didn't, have agood effort with it, but that's kind of the the mindset and kind of how SRS andbdars ar treat and then it is tough. It's really unfortunate, but I will saywith with how the industrys, involving especially around the sophisticationneeded to be effective, I'm optimistic that that will change that bdrs nstrswill start getig a little more respect because they definitely deserve ittotally agree in that many consultant language. You used really connectedwith me because it ties together some of hat w you're talking about in yourprevious response, which is like generically speaking kind of business,acumen, blended with Persona and industry knowledge, and there is aconsultancy rule to play here, which is I'm talking with. You know people inyour role and in your industry every day all day, and I would like to sharesome of what I've learned by surveying the scene and getting into conversationwith you, and so I completely see that and agree so walk us through your threeses. What did you dobviously? I Love Fra Works. I love things that are easyto remember, but how did you arrive at this and just walk us through them,yeah sure so the three ces as ventione our career, culture and competation? Ithink one of the cool things about my place, an owdiership role, as that wasa br before and I've seen and spoken to a lot of different bdrs. I know kind ofwhat gets people to Tacke, also knowing what gets people be motivated and thereality is every BDR needs someone to work for that has a true, and this isnot jisrivideors for a lot of different people, but srsbrs needed to havesomeone who's truly invested in their career. So you know as an SR begareleader, O or o you AF, the video supportin AD marketing. You don'tnecessarily know kind of the int theintogi sees of the othe role. Therehas to be a system set up in place,...

...whether it's you know he course of ayear two years, whatever may be, where there's some kind of path for for thebdrs ansdrs like it is too hard of a job and there's too much of rejectionon a constant basis to not have a northstar guide union that direction.So every sdrbdort needs to have thatcareer aspect. Compensation is a no bringer. You know you're working reallyhard. You want to make sure that the efforts of what you're doing what you'rdoing are seen and so having a clear cut. compersition plan that's alivewith obviously the the business goals, but make sure that your team is takingcare of. It is really important. Aso Talk About Career Tokol conversationnow as talk about culture, and this is definitely pulled from my time as a professional athlete, but theculture is kind of what makes it breaks the team, because if you have a team,that's gruwing working really hard and there's an a there's, an mechanismplace to make sure that people are taking care of each other or takingcare of as a whole, conbetreally challenging and our way sick sense ofmaking sure that we are addressing the culture. Is We have this company Acronmof family and family stands for fun, accountability, mindfulness, integrity,love and yes, and every single week during every forecasting call with myBDR team. We highlight two people per region and have them spit off like whatdo they see from other people n an overshadow session? What people fromthe team did they see who are embodying that family culture did that personhave a yes mentality, meaning that you know there're just one catence or onesequence that had to be done and though it wasn't something that was going tobe within their job scope. They did it because it meat the for th, the betterGod of the overall team, were they encountable in the fact that we had tohave this account structure put in place, and everyone had to do it forthe team to be overall effect that theyhad are Numver, so every singleastect. That of that acronym, is something that we all try to live forand also not to mention. The reality is like, though we do promote it. Ifsomeone isn't embodying that, then we do address it as well, because you knowhaving that strong culture is important and it kind of gets you througheverything you go through so so good. I love the acronym that it spells family.I mean there's, certainly some debate about ar we family members or teammembers or both can't we be both. I so appreciate that love is in thereit's one of those things that that I don't think you know it's something weall need and want, and- and I think it's something that is often left onthe sideline, because it's not sufficiently professional or it's notreally quantifiable. It's like to you know. It's really really good. I reallylike that. The other thing I want to highlight here is how smart theapproach is, because you reference dirlyher in the conversation, this ideaof not just saying the culture or trying to capture it in words, butactually sustaining it over time, not just onboarding to it, but making sureit's a living, breathing aspect of the organization every day, and so thisidea of giving it to team members in order to prop each other up ondifferent aspects of it is really really smart. We do is aversion of thatourselves around our five core values, but I really appreciate that you'redoing it within your team, something you said in that in that passage there,that would made me careous how big is the team and how is it? You know, Ithink you mentioned regions h w, like just describe briefly your teamstructure, yeah sure so right now, roughly but twenty of us on the EastCoast and West Coast, so team in New York tee in San Francisco, though Iwill say through Covid, wer kind of all is right now, but it again reallyimportant for the culture, because we intentionally have it where, if you'reon the East Coast, you're shouting someone on the West Coast, if you're inthe West Coast, who'r Shting US Ol on the East Coast and that's just our wayof basically making sure their team is taying connected through everything,really good. Give me one layer deeper on compensation really quickly. Maybewhat are some common errors that you've seen your peers and other organizationsdoing with regard to commensation or maybe an insight whether it's somethingyou developed or or implemented yourself or again, whether it's Sayyouknow you're engaged with the SDR community? Maybe it's something youlearn from someone else: what's maybe a...

...misunderstanding or a misstep withregard to compensation, maybe a trend or something cool or interesting oruseful- that that has been really helpful. Yeah sure so copet like bdrsrconversation, is something that people really struggle with, and I've done amillion different interations of this and the one that I feel t mostconfident. I've been using pretty consistently for the past two years ishaving a blended approach of compassting. The team for sal or soecepted leads, or basically a qualified opportunity, O stageoln opportunity, aswell as an asco of more of a sales qualified opportunity, and I've noticedif you cop your team, primarily on meetings, then the quality ofopportunities aren't very strong. If you com up your team only on qualifiedopportunities, sometimes there's not very much that the SR r bdrs can doafter that initial meeting to push it to qualified opportunity so having anapproach where you're mainly compissing the team for generating strong meaingsthat go well, but also horly accountable for those opportunities ata certain degree and make sure they progress. FORWIRD is really important,and you know for the time that I've been doing this one, if I guess thepast two years or so, I've had a lot of successwith thit and I think a lot ofpeople should think if you're you're kind of thinking about how to properlydo your teams conversation plan take a look at whether or not Yourecompersating only for one or the other and try and find a way to blend. Itwill not only make sure that your team is going the right direction, but theoverall quality of your part going to be strong, really smart. I reallyappreciate that blend of quality and quantity, ind figuring how a way toblend them together so that it works it kind of teas up. You know sometimesI'll ask questions in a variety of ways, but they all have this. What do youwish more of this person knew about this role or function S. I've got acouple of those for you and one of them kind of goes to to where you just were,which is what do you wish? More Account Executives, knew or understood aboutsales development or the SDR role yeah. It's really interesting that you askthat, because a lot of acounting that cun, just weras or videos totally- andthere was kind of goes to whish- goes to your career, see a little bit. Ithat I think a lot of people see that as a natural progression. Maybe but butI've also talked to the number of SDRs thayre like yeah. I don't really wantto do that. I'm just not quite sure what I want to do, and so they want tobe you earnest. They want hat exactly at a team of feel Sood. Sorry Yeah,you're right and you know the biggest thing that I kind of cautionkinofsecutives to do is to is to know that maybe the Straegy that you didisis yrb or what works for you is necessarily the and ill be all I liketo hire and work with. SRS Vedos are really dynamic and the do't want tolike. I want them to take the handcuffs off and basically kind of run, free andtest and try and to find new ways to learn and when you kind of pigeon wholeyour Sdrbdr, because you have a certain way of doing things and don't allowthem him or her to kind of exercise or creativity and kind of grow in theirown capacity. I think it's a big mistake that a lot of as do reallyreally good observation, even that ties back to something you said before,which is the way it's being done now is different than the way it was beingdone six months ago and should be different six months from now as well,and so you think about an a that's, maybe been doing it for a year or twoand they're really removed from that process. At somelayer in the market ismoving very quickly for a variety of reasons, some of which you've alreadyhit on. What do you wish more marketers knew or understood about SDR or thesales development role? Yeah. That's a great question. I think that alot of marketers look at the SR Mida role as a lot more like, like just purenumbers of like pushout x, amount of sequences make x amount of dials andthe reality is like in marketing. There are a lot of different systems in placethat rely an a metric, so it makes sense to kind of think of that way attimes, but I wish that marketers knew how dynamic, strs and bdrs had to be anorder generated meeting, because it's not quite as black and black as whiteas just using a temt letter using a sequon circatinse that you think workswell right, which brings hem back to video a little bit. I'd love to knowwhen how much is your team using video...

...and because it like the reason that justcame back to mind, was one I like to go a little bit deeper on it, but then toit, isn't just sequencees. It is about some of these kind of subtleties andnuances, and even some immeasurables that make someone really really good inthe role. And so when did you kind of get turned on to video? How did youview it? It were you one of these people that are like this seems like agimmick or where you're like. Oh this lets my people be people or you know,what's your view of it, and maybe how is your team embraced it or not,embraced it yeah it's groot question, so I think I first I mean I think Ifirst started like getting interest in video right when I was leaving the SBGrole becoming a and I think it was kind of from fairly early on where a lot ofcompanies weren't really using it. It wasn't baked into my process, but itwas somebody that at least explored on my first thome I built out. We actuallydid use video and I think there are right ways to do it and when you do itthe right way, and you understand the goals associate with what you're tryingto get out he video, then you can do really well with it and also for us,but we have a METROC OT it like. I want to make sure that y team as any xvideos per week for month, because we know it's a really strong touchpointthat can drive conversations, and you know you always hear and say it whereyou know if an organization gets a really strong video, really creativevideo from srbdr kind of just goes viral the organizon totally andespecially, if you think about taking an account based approach. That's howyou do account base selling like if I can have an SRBDR, do a really creativevideo 's. The point where, like someone laughs, O so gets some kind of Ejoyment,I don't an to see a true value in it and he get shared problim solvedeveryone. The company knows about six cents, and I think people forget thatwhen they use video, because at times when you, when you use video likepeople wight say well, I want to know I want to get the email responsible rightaway. I woantt send one video get get a meeting right off of the Bat, but thereality is like Gess. It does happen. That's happen to free com in, but it'snot just about that. First Meeting, it's about taking the video and seeinghow many clicks. How many clicks came from that, because if it's gettingclicked Alo n Shite a lot thee, ther really are in corporating a trueaccount based model Wereverin. The R organization is seeing and that's kindof what we measure a team off. So we have the metric of making sure you'redoing videos on a weekly basis, both in those videos. Yes, we you want to seesome meanings coming through ut that, but you also want to see like Ar. Areyou getting a lot of opens and clicks, because we know that I tink sales loftit? Some kind of study on this is kind of Loik. What I preach to my team, butwe do know that if you do incorporate video, that Thi Increases Yourresponsorate by like twenty six percent, and the reason why we say that is in isnot just off that first touch email, but it allows you to take a trueaccountbase approach where, like you, have a lot, a strong familiarry withyour face in your brand, where yee a lot more receptive to responding backto you right, I have that vision to I'm looking. My Vision for rd is someonewho's, helping people do this every single day and encouraging people to doit all this is that it stops being a thing like no one. No one makes a big deal out of an email Orlito gove actual request or a voice. Maile, I mean a lot of people, don'tlike to do them and thereas certainly ways to do them better and differentways to time them and place them, but my hope is thet. Video just becomespart of the mix and in it is the one that is the most of the whole person. So I canassociate your voice mail and your email with something a bit more humanand hopefully fun and interesting, and so, when you say creative by the way Iwant to, I want to really emphasize this because people that are on thesidelines with video right now. I think they hear a word like really creativevideo and they think whell. I don't have time for creativityor I don't have the budget for creativity around, have the equipmentfor creativity, but I have heard a number of creative ideas that costreally nothing and frankly so many of them I've seen get sales raps and otherpeople really excited because it just makes ther job a little bit more funlike they have this ike this slightly creative idea. They didn't ask for youknow eighteen hundred bucks to executed or eighteen grand o executed they justlike. Oh, I know it would be fun to do or interesting to do or what might work.So g ve give a quick pass on creative...

...to knock down. Anythe myth surround it,yeah sure thing and I think with creattimity that you can go a lot ofdifferent directons. You can be short and sweet, we're going to take the moreinvolved abroad involved, but more F, the the approach where you doing a lotmore research and Tryn tofigre out different ways. Gatin there I've seensome awesome, creative videos where this one SDR basically did a free styleto a Hamilton Song on a piano to a company and whent viroot theorganization, but on the flipside Creativi Coul be as simple as you seepeople using tit to bord the whiteboards. It can be as simple as youknow. I think it's photo. I forget the website is so basically showing a newsarticle with the person's name on and in a fun headline. So there are a lotof ways to scale creativity and I think people kind of forget that, but as longas you have like your own voice and your own brand and kind of your own wayof doing things, it can be pretty easy to do so ind. But I do think it isreally important to have creativity in your video because it does allow tostick out yeah. I like it- and I just want to reinforce to something you saidearlier, which is the. Why and the how behind video is. Is a lot is a lot of it. If you understand whyyou're doing it- and you have some basic guidance on how to do it, it'llin a lot of ways take care of itself, and it's just another- nice richer,more complete touchpoint than some of the other ones that were offering. So Iguess kind of last question here before I toyu up for two of my favoritequestions. I guess it's kind of three I par a couple of them together, but what is unique about the defensive endposition, yeah sure, so the defensive end in myeyes, probably e, most athaletic positions on devensis on thes side ofball, because you're going against people that are like kids, do not like six. Eight threeehundred an fifty pounds like like an actual te definition of a giant rgtey quike, an actual giant yeah. But the same time, you also have to docertain athlete performance that you're running with or competing with some ofthe most athletic people in the game. So it's a pure combination of strengthand speed, but the thing that I love the most about the position is highlytechnical, like if you're a great devensive en and to get to the NFL kindof simmer to what I did is you really only have to hone in on one skill set?That's your strength and just rerentang repeat it make it stronger and strongerthroughout time. So it's a weird position where it's probably one of themost athletic on the field, but also one of the most technical. So it's youdon't really see that very often in terms that combination, but I will saythat understanding of the position help me a ton as I transition salesexcellent and that's why I did that qualifier off the top of sportsanalogies and metaphors in terns of phrase, because they're just everywhere-and I didn't want to do that. But I knew there was something there for youjust just doing h way that you talked about it. So if you have enjoyed thisconversation so far with earnest and there is more to come, I've got twomore that I know. You'll also enjoy episode. Seventy one of the customerexperience podcast and that was with edbrialt the CMO at a Primo. He is aCMO that has bdrsdr reporting to him and we talked a lot of video and thetheme of that one was differentiating your brand by humanizing the experience,so that was episode. Seventy one with Ebrialto a premo and then or a littlebit earlier on episode, Fifty One with Joe Caprio at the time, Yo use VP salesat chorus and he's currently a cofounder at Rapres, and we call thatone how to enable your sales team, practical tips for sales leaders.Ernest got a few things for you here and first up is the opportunity for you to think ormention someone. Who's had a positive impact on your life for your careeryeah sure. So, if I think about this, this whole tech game that startdplaying aftr our finish playing football, the one person who reallymade a big impact on Mea, actually never een, really worked with him. Isthis Guy Name Chris Castaldini? So when I was eventually moving onto going fromthe countisecutive to an a BDR manager,...

I a lot of times beyour managers whenyou first do it you're, honestly, not really reportidg to the bdrmangyougotta come build the go the planes or flying. So I had to reach out a a lotof people trying to like figure out what to do and I've reached out to him,and he gave me so much information that I've kind of you know went to whats thebank with, but also even in that I remember he did linkedin cost where hejust talked about our conversation and like really made me feel good becausehe was saying like this is a guy who did this this and this like. Heapproached me and he tried to learn and watch out for earnest, he's going to beone of the great scrbtour leaders in the future, and it was really cool toget that, especially because I honestly had no idea what I was doing. Toth timeand just seeing someone who didn't really know me, who really believed inme was something that you know. I always cherish. That's so good, and Ius just assume you approached him from an honest and curious and sincereposition ask for a little bit of help and it's so funny. I would assume thatthe work ethic required to play professional football as well as kindof the grit you were talking about earlier in the BDR role is, you know, lends itself to to asking-and I think so so many people that don't have those kind of qualities,missopportunities to learn and grow and connect, because they're a little bitafraid to ask. Maybe so that was awesome and what was he doing at thetime like what was his role? Why did you choose or reach out to him sure sohe was leading the SRBO team. An optimize he's now transition on to forewhat companies art right now, but he's now actually selling them enerpriceside and the reason I reached out to him, because I knew that he knew hisstuff like he in the industry. He was Stolin that people always talked about.He had a very large team and I knew I had a lot to learn from him and to yourpoint: Yeah I', never hesitant to reach out to ask someone for help like moretime, Tan, not all of us whether we want to believe it or not. We don'thave to reinvent the wheel. We don't have to do it and a lot of thechallenges, an offsoels that were going to face have been done by others. Soit's always in our best interest to try and reach out o the people. Tha've doneit really well, and he was one of them. So that's just why we shot to reallygood how about Ernest, a company or a brand that you appreciate a respect forthe experience they deliver for you as a customer yeah sure, so one that I'vebeen accustomer with them. For three going on four years now is a companycalled SP, ACODEMY and Scounty is essentially an organization that helpsfind individuals from R underupsen and backgrounds and helps theme, land rolesand str roles. So I first started working them. I'd say it was the springof two thousand and seventeen, where I did a lot of mentoring, kind of helpingpeople pprepare for interviews, teaching of e Tex round how to beingeffective Srbdr, and I love everything they stand for so working with anorganization that you know really hits home to me with a lot of my values andthat's some of the people sthink about with you know, customer experience asomething that I' always Suishi, because I know they are fighting afight that I you know truly care about. Ni said someone wants to check hem out.Where should they go? Yep S ACODEMYCOM, orgust reachopt? To me, I be Morethanhaving Ma connection awesome earnest if that leasts wo buy final question,which is if someone wants to connect with you they. Obviously, if they'relistening at this point, they found it interesting, helpful and engaging, andso if someone wants to connect with you or they want to learn more about sixcents like or SB Academy, where wo send people jure. So I'll talk about mefirst, if you want to reach out to me, my two mediums are one Linkdin, that'sprobably R, most active, so Lincoln, Acom, Bernest, Ausu and then I'm ontwitter as another one. And surprisingly, there are a lot ofearnest Amusus, you think that's a not coman a, but it actually is prettycommon. So my twitter handle is the earnest Towusu in terms of trying tofigure out whether or not you want to have a conversation with six cense oron more what we do definitely going throug website. We actually have thisthing where we call an in market man report. So if you're interested inlearning more about the companies that are researching your brand name or evenyour competitors, that's a really quick form to fill out to get a sense of whatthe information looks like hate. You filled in well do the analsis for youand then basically pass ther Wer tes you can. You can learn more about that,so going a website and filld th in market a mariport. It's really customreport that should help you and also...

...last en all Lese with SC Acaoy, justGong sccom and fillt a form and they'll be re, they'll, be sure to reach out toyou awesome. I love that opportunity on your website. It so just classicwonderful, complete blend of leading with value. That also demonstrates yourexpertise, so well done. I earnest. I appreciate this so much appreciate yourtime be really fun. Thank you. Alsome got having clear communication, humanconnection, higher conversion. These are just some of the benefits of addingvideo to the messages your sending every day. It's easy to do with just alittle guidance, so pick up the official book, Rehumonize Your Business,how personal videos, accelerate sales and improve customer experience learnmore in order today at Bombam Com book, that's bomb, vombcom fuck, thanks forlistening to the customer experience. podcast remember the single mostimportant thing you can do today is to create and deliver a better experiencefor your customers, continue learning the latest strategies and tactics bysubscribing right now in your favorite podcast player, or visit Bombomcompodcast.

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